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Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

InnerCity Weightlifting’s (ICW) mission is to reduce youth violence by connecting proven-risk young people with new networks and opportunities, including meaningful career tracks in and beyond personal training. We use the gym to replace segregation and isolation with economic mobility and social inclusion, disrupting the system that leads to urban street violence.

Mission Statement

InnerCity Weightlifting’s (ICW) mission is to reduce youth violence by connecting proven-risk young people with new networks and opportunities, including meaningful career tracks in and beyond personal training. We use the gym to replace segregation and isolation with economic mobility and social inclusion, disrupting the system that leads to urban street violence.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $1,853,582.00
Projected Expense $1,834,326.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Corporate Training Service
  • Personal Training Career Track
  • Summer Workout Series

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

InnerCity Weightlifting’s (ICW) mission is to reduce youth violence by connecting proven-risk young people with new networks and opportunities, including meaningful career tracks in and beyond personal training. We use the gym to replace segregation and isolation with economic mobility and social inclusion, disrupting the system that leads to urban street violence.


Background Statement

The inspiration for ICW came to Executive Director and Founder, Jon Feinman, during a year of Athletes in Service. Stationed at a middle school in East Boston he was tasked with designing recess and after school programs. He gravitated towards a group of young people that he was warned were "impossible to work with". These young people were affiliated with or being recruited to join the gang MS 13. Despite the warning, Jon felt compelled to learn about these young people, and the circumstances that had led them to their current situation. By kicking around a soccer ball and working out in the weight room with them, he was able to get to know them for who they really were, beyond stereotypes and misconceptions. His relationship with one of these young people in particular, had a profound impact upon Jon. After the structure of his year in service was over, he couldn't help but think there had to be a way to work with this population, with the firm belief that these young people were not bad decision makers, but that society had not given them good choices to begin with.
Jon founded ICW in 2010 after leaving a successful career as a personal trainer to get his MBA at Babson College. A bootstrapped organization, working out of borrowed space in a Back Bay gym, ICW started with 4 students. We quickly grew to over 50, with 139 in 2017. What distinguishes ICW is our commitment to working with a population that other organizations screen out, young people at the highest risk for violence.
 
Today ICW has 2 dedicated facilities: our headquarters in Dorchester and our revenue generating site in Kendall Square. In response to our 4 stage model of trust, hope, bridging social capital, and economic mobility we have seen recidivism rates for our students drop from over 80% in our first stage, to less than 15% in our 4th stage. Our personal training career track has allowed our students, who come from household incomes of $10K per year or less to earn $35K or more through a meaningful career. For students training in our Kendall Square facility, their average monthly incomes have grown from $600 per month to $3,796 per month within 2 years.
In 2016 - 2017 ICW gave a TEDx talk, was featured on Channel 5 (local ABC), and received the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Sports Award. We were named a Citizens Bank Champion in Action, and a Bostinno 50 on Fire winner.

Impact Statement

1) More than 90% of ICW students report an increased sense of hope for the future. 

2) For our most committed students there is a 78% reduction in violent crime.

3) More than 70% of our most committed students spend a record amount of time out of jail.
 
4) 95% of students who reached stage 3 or 4 of our model avoided incarceration in 2016.
 
5) In 2016 373 unique personal training clients trained with our student trainers, representing new network connections and access to social capital.

Needs Statement

In Boston, less than 1% of young people are responsible for 50% of gun violence. As overwhelming as this seems, according to the police and public health commission, it is only 450 young people driving a disproportionate percentage of it. In Philadelphia, it is 1,100 young people, and in Chicago as tragic as the numbers are, it is only 1,400. By reaching a few hundred in each city, we can have a profound ripple effect and impact tens of thousands of lives, making our communities safer and more inclusive.
This is the population that we work with. Most of our students come from Dorchester, Mattapan, and Roxbury. Most have been shot, nearly all have done significant jail time and come from household incomes of less than $10K per year. They are written off, segregated and isolated to the streets, trapped in a system of chronic violence and inequality.
According to Crime and Justice Institute there are 4 big risk factors for criminal behavior: 1) hopelessness, 2) impulsiveness, 3) peers who are breaking the law, 4) a history of breaking the law.

CEO Statement

I was born into a family and community with connections and opportunity. Everyone I knew went to school, and that was my focus growing up. I leveraged an education to find a meaningful career, and all along the way I was labeled a good decision maker, when in reality, I only had good options to choose from.
 
Our students, however, are born into families and communities that are segregated and isolated. Unlike myself, they need to worry about rent, food, clothes. There is no way that school can be their only focus. They take to the streets to solve for the very real challenges they face each day. Rather than leveraging an education to find a meaningful career, they find themselves in jail. They come out more segregated, more isolated. They are labeled bad decision makers, when, in reality, they only have bad options to choose from.
This system is perpetuated every time we as a society resolve to avoid certain areas, certain streets, certain people, as this is what happens in most major cities affected by violence. Perhaps, for a problem rooted in segregation and isolation, our solution should not be to segregate and isolate people, first by circumstance, then by prison. A solution that costs society $64B - $80B a year to lock people up. While consequences are needed, those consequences cannot simply be more of the same.
ICW disrupts this system by bridging social capital. Through our model and through personal training our students get to walk with purpose into the offices of The Boston Consulting Group, General Electric, and Athenahealth, they get to meet people they might not otherwise have the opportunity to meet, and they get to see the world – and be seen by the world – in a very different way.
Through the gym, we are able to address the biggest risk factors, starting with trust, hope, and building a network of peers that can create various paths to opportunity. Whereas our students’ 6-month outlook on life starts with death or jail; as they gain trust, hope, social capital, and economic mobility, their 6-month outlook shifts to pursuing an education, finding a meaningful career, and enjoying a future that was not always guaranteed.

Board Chair Statement

ICW faces the challenge of working with a highly underserved and misunderstood population. Many organizations are simply not set up to deal with our students, and in many cases screen them out due to reporting standards. We recognize that given the incredible barriers our students face it is unrealistic to place them into a one size fits all program model, and that success metrics need to be carefully defined. Therefore, instead of building an organization with preconceived notions about what is best for our students, we have involved them at every level of planning and programming, learning from them how we can best address their unique needs. This ideology has led to a meaningful career track in personal training and a positive community, creating economic mobility and social inclusion, allowing ICW to bridge the gap between a highly marginalized population and society-at-large, creating hope where previously there was none.
 
Our success can be seen not only in our students’ new positive outlook on life, and their improved life circumstances, but the overall systemic change that is taking place as ICW brings together 2 very disparate parts of society: our students, coming from neighborhoods plagued with violence and poverty, and our personal training clients often coming from 6 or 7 figure backgrounds with high-powered social networks. It is seen when an ICW student trainer from the South End runs into one of his clients on Tremont St., and they shake hands and greet each other instead of crossing the street to avoid one another. It is seen when an ICW student trainer who was on the verge of homelessness turns to the ICW community for help instead of the streets. He is now able to pay rent, is training clients in our new Kendall Square facility, and is enrolled in college courses. These examples show how powerful the combination of economic mobility and social inclusion is in addressing the needs of the most disenfranchised youth in Boston.
 
The reason I volunteer with ICW is quite simply that ICW has made me a better person – both in my physical health and in my connections to others. ICW has made me more open-minded, more civically engaged, and more connected to the Boston community. Recent events in Ferguson, Baltimore, and elsewhere have demonstrated how important it is that society not “write off” anyone, or stereotype them as dangerous. I feel that I have a much better understand of one of the most important contemporary issues in our society, and that I am helping to address it. Recent events show that ICW’s work is very important, and I am grateful to be involved.

Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
ICW primarily serves young people coming from the neighborhoods of Dorchester, Mattapan, Roxbury and the South End.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development NEC
  2. Public & Societal Benefit - Public & Societal Benefit NEC
  3. Recreation & Sports - Physical Fitness/Community Recreational Facilities

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Corporate Training Service

Through ICW’s corporate training service 1 coach and 2 student trainers travel offsite to conduct group workouts at the offices of various company clients. This allows us to leverage our skillset to create paid job opportunities for our students and a revenue source for our organization as we build relationships with likeminded corporate leaders.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success  Since launching our Corporate Training Service in 2012 we have worked with over 15 company clients. Our current client roster includes: John Hancock, The Boston Consulting Group, InsightSquared, Athenahealth, General Electric, Celtra, Babson College, VMware, Dell EMC, and Wayfair.
Program Long-Term Success  In addition to paid job opportunities for our coaches and students we seek to build our corporate training service into a revenue source that will lead to the long term sustainability of ICW.
Program Success Monitored By  The success of our Corporate Training Service is monitored by our ability to retain clients, the number of paid job opportunities created for our students and coaches, and the amount of revenue created for our organization.
Examples of Program Success  As of Spring 2017 we are currently averaging 8 - 12 corporate training sessions weekly.

Personal Training Career Track

At the core of ICW programming is our personal training career track. Students first work towards the ICW Certification: a practical approach to learning technical skills as well as core competencies such as professionalism and accountability. Once students are certified they are able to assess clients, design appropriate exercise programs based on the information they collect during assessment, and then coach clients through those programs demonstrating safe and proper exercise form. They then have the option to move on to the NASM CPT or ISSA certifications, 2 of the most recognized credentials in the fitness industry. Students immediately receive paid, hands-on job experience as clients (people from the opposite end of the socioeconomic spectrum) come into our facilities to train with them. 
Budget  $877,106.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success 

We have seen tremendous short-term success in our personal training career track. We have more than 20 student trainers enrolled in the program, and have worked with more than 400 personal training clients. 

Program Long-Term Success  Students involved in our personal training career track see a huge increase in their economic mobility, and for several students training in our Kendall Square facility incomes have jumped to over $35K annually. Coming from household incomes of $10K or less annually, this is truly a life-changing opportunity. Perhaps even more important is the social inclusion that’s created as clients invite students into their homes to meet their families, give them access to resources that were previously unavailable to them, and breakdown stereotypes and misconceptions through mutual understanding. A diverse inclusive community that is formed within the gym extends beyond. 
Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is monitored by an increase in economic mobility for our students, and through a change in perspective of our personal training clients as they get to know our students for who they really are, and start to understand the system that is leading young people who face segregation and isolation to turn to the streets to meet their basic needs. By reaching our clients we can create systemic change and disrupt this system, ensuring equal access to opportunity for all young people regardless of their socioeconomic status.

Examples of Program Success 
100% of the students enrolled in the program are now training clients.
 
We have seen the perspective of our personal training clients change regarding our students. They are no longer “gang members” in the eyes of their clients, but good young people who have faced extreme segregation and isolation. Clients in turn become advocates for our students and organization, showing up in court, visiting our students in jail, providing academic and professional opportunities, and becoming a positive support system in their lives.
 
In Kendall Square we've seen the monthly income of our student trainers jump from $600 to $3,796. 

Summer Workout Series

The Summer Workout Series is ICW’s signature annual event. In collaboration with the Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy, ICW holds outdoor workouts over the course of each summer. The workouts are open to the public and led
 by ICW staff and student trainers. Workouts are tailored to individual fitness levels to encourage maximum participation.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success  In the summers of 2014, 2015 and 2016 we had incredible success with our Summer Workout Series thanks to the amazing efforts of our staff and student trainers and the generous support of our sponsors.
Program Long-Term Success  We seek to continue to grow the Summer Workout Series as our signature annual event. It is an incredible platform to spread ICW messaging and build our community by engaging people and networks we have not yet reached.
Program Success Monitored By 
Our ability to grow the Summer Workout Series, build participation and attract sponsorship. 
Examples of Program Success  In 2014, 2015 and 2016 over 600 people participated in ICW's Summer Workout Series!

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Our model of impact starts with trust and hope. Our students’ 1-year outlook on life, before joining ICW is death or jail. The statistics prove it. Most have been shot, and all except for a couple have done significant jail time. Students join the program completely by choice. There are no court orders or mandates, just the simple but powerful effect of word of mouth and the community formed in the gym. Through building trust and positive relationships with ICW staff, students are empowered with a new sense of hope and a belief in an alternative future.
 
We leverage the gym to earn our students trust through positive mentorship, and to be there for them during their most difficult decision points. We aren’t there to tell them what to do, but instead to try to guide them to any number of positive solutions, knowing that at the end of the day the decision is theirs. Over time, belief turns into action. Our students begin to engage in less risky behaviors.
 
Through personal training the world of our students and the world of our clients (people coming from opposite socioeconomic backgrounds) come together. Some students become certified trainers, earning $20 - $60 per hour, and all of our students, for the first time in their lives, gain access to an inclusive network and community that puts them in touch with all the opportunities that may have existed, but previously were not attainable.
The outcomes are reduced violence, reduced segregation and isolation, increased economic mobility, social inclusion and connectivity. A diverse inclusive community that forms within the gym extends beyond.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Jonathan Feinman
CEO Term Start Jan 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
After 5 years experience as a personal trainer and competitive Olympic lifter, Jon gave up his career to begin ICW. Building on his past experience as an AmeriCorps member working with court-involved youth, he enrolled in Babson to get his MBA and create a sustainable nonprofit.

He did not grow up in the streets and recognized that to make this program work, our target students would have to build the program. He gained their trust and listened to what they wanted.

Weightlifting was a common interest. We provided gym space and time. They needed jobs, but past crimes stood in the way. We created an in-house career track in personal training and entrepreneurship. They wanted to finish their high school education, at a minimum. We partnered with tutors and GED programs. They wanted to help each other and prevent the youngest students from making the same mistakes. We created an environment that empowered them to do so.

Their “want” to participate in ICW gave us an incredible opportunity. We weren’t court appointed caseworkers, or hired professionals telling them what to do. We were coaches, role models, friends. We were able to develop meaningful relationships that extended beyond the gym.

For his work, Jon has received awards from the Boston Celtics, Babson College, Cabot Creamery, Anytime Fitness, Social Innovation Forum and Ernst & Young.  
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Mikelina Belaineh Student Engagement Manager
Mickey Belaineh grew up in Arlington,Texas before attending Texas A&M University where she competed on the A&M Powerlifting Team. While at A&M, she graduated Magna Cum Laude honors in Political Science, was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society, and went on to be the 2012 USAPL Collegiate Powerlifting National Champion of her weight class. Driven by her experiences with on-campus advocacy efforts, she proceeded to pursue and complete her J.D at Harvard Law School.
 
While in Law School, Mickey dedicated herself to social justice work addressing issues on and off campus and continued to compete in Powerlifting at the National and International Level as a sponsored athlete. She has since been a USAPL Raw National Champion, an IPF Raw World Champion , and holds various USAPL American Records. In her role as Student Engagement Manager, she is responsible for developing and overseeing the implementation of ICW's various outreach and advocacy initiatives, while continuing to further develop internal intervention models to support and serve our students.
Mr. Shamsul Emrich Head Coach Shamsul received his BA from Boston University in International Relations with a minor in Economics. He is a Certified Personal Trainer through the National Strength and Conditioning Association, and is a ZHealth Master Practioner. Shamsul has over 13 years of experience as a personal trainer with over 11,000 hours of client sessions under his belt.
Mr Josh Feinman Director of Development and Communications Josh has a Bachelor’s degree from Berklee College of Music, is a Certified Personal Trainer (National Academy of Sports Medicine), and is fluent in Spanish. He has 10 years of personal training experience. InnerCity Weightlifting has given him the opportunity to combine his passions for fitness and social justice. In his role of Program Director, Josh is responsible for managing and growing the SAP program and EIS model as well as working with program staff (i.e. coaches) and students.
Mr Zachary Sloan Director of Finance and Operations Zach has experience working with at risk youth as a Teach For America corps member. He has also worked with the Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA), advising several business clients on a wide variety of financial and operational initiatives. Zach recently earned his MBA from Babson College Graduate School, where he earned Magna Cum Laude honors.
Mr. Reginald Talbert General Manager and Dorchester Site Director Reginald Talbert is the General Manager. He was born in South Carolina and moved to Boston at the age of five. In high school, he developed an interest in football. His dream was stopped when he was shot and paralyzed from the neck down at the age of eighteen. After about 2 years of self physical therapy and support from his mother he began to heal inside and out, only to spend the next 29 years in a revolving door in the penitentiary. While serving time, he believed it allowed him to find his purpose in life. Supporting young adults in helping them discover their success. Reggie as well as being a general manager is the cultural ambassador of the gym.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
50 on Fire BostInno 2016
Champion in Action Citizens Bank 2016
Sports Award Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 2016
Boston's Best Feel Good Workout Improper Bostonian 2015
Entrepreneur Of The Year Award in New England EY 2015
Rosoff Award for Nonprofit Diversity Initiative The AD Club 2015
10 Outstanding Young Leaders Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce 2014
Heroes Among Us Boston Celtics 2012
Social Innovator Social Innovation Forum 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

While ICW is committed to supporting our students on a daily basis by providing them with a safe-haven from the streets, and to increasing economic mobility and bridging social capital through our career track in personal training, we recognize that we cannot solve the problem of youth violence alone, and that when working with young people who have experienced such a great deal of trauma issues will arise that fall beyond our scope of expertise. Because of this our student engagement team works to works to maintain and cultivate our network of partnering organizations.
 
A highlight of this network is ICW's relationship with YouthConnect Boston. YouthConnect provides free licensed clinical social workers that are available to meet with students in our facilities. This creates a multi-faceted approach to addressing the unique needs of our students: as ICW helps with economic mobility and social inclusion, YouthConnect is able to address mental and emotional health.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 13
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 90%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Mr Todd Millay
Board Chair Company Affiliation Choate Investor Advisors
Board Chair Term Jan 2016 - Jan 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Michael Boyle Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning Voting
Mr Chris Byner Boston Center for Youth and Families Voting
Mr. Jorge Calzada National Grid Voting
Mr Grant Freeland Boston Consulting Group Voting
Mrs Carolyn Grimes Simmons College Voting
Mr John Larivee Community Resources for Justice Voting
Mr. Matt Lesniak Bain Capital Voting
Mr Juan-Pablo Mas Morganthaler Ventures Voting
Mr Todd Millay Choate Investment Advisors Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 1
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • By-laws
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We have made it a priority from the start of InnerCity Weightlifting to empower our youth to help each other and help build InnerCity Weightlifting together. They are stewards of our program and mission, not passive recipients of our services.
 
Nearly every decision that is made, whether it be at the board level or another level of the organization, is done with their input. This gives us a powerful platform to create social change, as we create an organization built by the young people we engage. 

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $1,853,582.00
Projected Expense $1,834,326.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990-EZ

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2014 P&L per InnerCity Weightlifting

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $1,556,619 $1,033,934 $779,581
Total Expenses $1,112,700 $651,326 $487,583

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,073,850 $796,491 $619,105
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $279,086 $215,002 $131,623
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $186,610 $21,441 $15,061
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $17,073 $1,000 $13,792
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $890,915 $502,456 $363,359
Administration Expense $92,124 $101,059 $101,249
Fundraising Expense $129,661 $47,811 $22,975
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.40 1.59 1.60
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 77% 75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 10% 5% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,544,847 $1,018,880 $632,995
Current Assets $1,430,012 $921,367 $579,313
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $99,516 $17,468 $14,191
Total Net Assets $1,445,331 $1,001,412 $618,804

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 14.37 52.75 40.82

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Since launching as a bootstrapped pilot model in 2010, we have been fortunate that our fundraising efforts have allowed us to grow at a steady rate. In 2010, we raised $75K, $250K in 2011, over $500K is 2012, over $700K in 2013, just over $1M in 2014 and over $1.5M in 2015. 2016 marked our first year with a small annual deficit. Our pre-audit financials report roughly a ($185,000) loss on an accrual basis.
We primarily attribute this to the process of ramping up of revenue-generating operations at our Kendall Square facility and a grant cycle that saw several multi year grants awarded and recognized in their entirety in 2015, with scheduled cash disbursements in 2016 and 2017. Despite the relatively small annual loss, our cash position remained strong at the end of 2016.
In 2016 our operating revenue was $1,206,916 (pre-audit) and total expenses were
$1,401,723.92 (pre-audit). Our total net assets at the end of 2016 were $1,372,472.42 (pre-audit). We currently have no debt and no endowment.
Over the last few years we've demonstrated responsible cash management practice, investing in the growth of our program, while ensuring we retain a safe cushion and adequate liquidity- given the unpredictability of grant cycles and our plans for continued growth.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organizations audited financials.
 
Please note, the FY14 P&L document, per the organization, is posted above for your reference.
 

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

In Boston, less than 1% of young people are responsible for 50% of gun violence. As overwhelming as the problem of street violence can be, in Boston, according to the police and public health commission, it’s only 450 young people driving a disproportionate percentage of it. In Philadelphia, it’s 1,100 young people, and in Chicago as tragic as the numbers are, it’s only 1,400. By reaching a few hundred in each city, we can have a profound ripple effect and impact tens of thousands of lives, and entire communities.
 
This is the population of young people we work with. Currently based in Boston, and looking to expand to Philadelphia, most of our students come from Dorchester, Mattapan, Roxbury, and the South End. Most have been shot, nearly all have done significant jail time, and come from family incomes of less than $10K per year. They are written off, segregated and isolated to the streets, trapped in a system of chronic violence and inequality.
 
According to Crime and Justice Institute there are 4 big risk factors for criminal behavior: 1) hopelessness, 2) impulsiveness, 3) peers who are breaking the law, 4) a history of breaking the law. There is a system that leads to prosperity and another that leads to these risk factors.
 
This system is perpetuated every time we as a society resolve to avoid certain areas, certain streets, certain people, as this is what happens in most major cities affected by violence. Perhaps, for a problem rooted in segregation and isolation, our solution shouldn’t be to segregate and isolate people, first by circumstance, then by prison: a solution that costs society $64B - $80B a year to lock people up. While consequences are needed, those consequences cannot simply be more of the same.
 
ICW disrupts this system by bridging social capital. Through our model and through personal training our students get to walk with purpose into the offices of The Boston Consulting Group, General Electric, Athenahealth, and several other companies, they get to meet people they might not otherwise have the opportunity to meet, and they get to see the world – and be seen by the world – in a very different way.
 
Through the gym, we are able to address the biggest risk factors, starting with trust, hope, and building a network of peers that can create various paths to opportunity. Whereas our students’ 6-month outlook on life starts with death or jail; as they gain trust, hope, social capital, and economic mobility, their 6-month outlook shifts to pursuing an education, finding a meaningful career, and enjoying a future that wasn’t always guaranteed.
 
While our model has helped to lower recidivism rates and increase economic mobility, as great as the impact is on our students, perhaps the greater impact is on our clients. Most of our clients have never known anyone that’s gone to jail, nevermind someone who has been shot and is labeled one of the most “dangerous” people in a city. They take our students out for coffee, they invite our students into their homes for dinner with their families. As our clients’ perceptions shift, as they tell their peers, new narratives start to form and these narratives have the power to fundamentally change the way we as a society interact with each other as we resolve to connect, rather than to avoid.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

We are looking to hire 2 more coaches and 2 more advocates as soon as funding is available. While we are proud to run a lean organization, we are at a growth point now where we are feeling the pressures of capacity as the ability to manage competing priorities is becoming more of a challenge. Having staff able to increasingly focus on specific areas will help us reach our 2017 goals related to the number of students we serve, the number of training sessions we complete, amount of income our students earn, and overall sustainability of our organization.
 
The coaches will teach our career track in personal training, focus on quality control of each training session, and ensure student and client satisfaction as it relates to our training services. This career track in personal training is at the core of our program as it builds upon the stages of trust and hope, and bridges social capital, creates social inclusion and economic mobility.
 
The advocates leverage the gym and career opportunity we offer as a reason to reach out to our students, to earn their trust and create hope. They go with our students to court, visit them in jail, and help with their most fundamental obstacles – getting an ID, setting up a bank account, assisting with safe transportation. They are the foundation of our program and allow for all the work to happen that people see at the surface.
 
In the back half of the year, we hope to add positions in customer service/sales (with a hope of hiring students for some of these positions) to will help with client satisfaction and retention.
 
These positions will help us keep up with demand for our services and provide us with the infrastructure and resources we need to open two more sites in Boston in the coming years, and support our first out of state expansion.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Since opening of our second facility in 2015, our earned income has grown by 1,373%, from $21K to $315K. In the last year, we picked up 163 new personal training clients, and 7 new corporate clients – where our students and coaches train employees at their corporate offices - including The Boston Consulting Group, John Hancock, Athenahealth, InsightSquared, VMWare, General Electric, and Wayfair. Altogether, we had 485 new participants in our training services last year. This growth creates both sustainability and impact as it directly creates socio-economic mobility for our students.
 
Of our first students who started training at our Kendall Square location mid-2015, their average incomes grew by another 49% last year, with an average monthly income now of $3,796. We’re seeing inclusion take form and social capital built. Our clients have offered job opportunities at their work, and advocated for students in court. As perceptions change, as new narratives form, our organization goes from directly impacting a few hundred, to reaching tens of thousands and more.
 
While we are hitting on new levels of impact, however, we are missing opportunities as well. We have over 90 students on our waitlist, who we can’t work with for safety and capacity reasons, and demand for our corporate training service that we are struggling to keep up with.
We know what to do, how to do it, and that the model works. Now we need staff and facilities to execute the model at scale. Specifically, in 2017 we are looking to sign a lease on a new site in Boston’s Seaport area, to double the volume of our training services, to increase corporate training sessions to 20 per week, and to increase student enrollment by 30.
 
To accomplish these goals, we aim to hire 2 additional advocates – a position dedicated to the first two stages of our model: earning trust, and creating hope. They help to build a network around each student that provides them with meaningful opportunity.
 
We are also looking to hire 2 more coaches - a position dedicated to the last two stages of our model: bridging social capital/inclusion, and economic mobility. Coaches also ensure the quality of our training services, help students get and retain clients, and lead our corporate training service alongside our students.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

With our students, we recognize that change does not happen overnight. And, that the short-term setbacks are often the best opportunity for long-term success. Therefore, we evaluate progress and success through our 4-stage model. This model helps us evaluate impact and better allocate resources, while measuring short-term success.
 
Stage 1 and 2 is “earning trust and creating hope.” In these stages our goals are to earn our students’ trust and create hope. We look at communication ratio (how often do they return our calls or texts), proactive communication (how often do they proactively reach out to us for help), frequency of gym visits, and qualitatively we measure their sense of hope for the future.
 
Stage 3 is “bridging social capital, creating inclusion.” In this stage, our goal is to bridge social capital. We leverage our relationships to provide positive alternatives for each student, by offering our career track in personal training, and by referring them to partnering organizations that can help with trauma, school, and future careers. Our leading indicator in this stage is the number of meaningful connections a student has, and qualitatively we look at the changing beliefs/perceptions among our students and clients for how they view each other.
 
Finally, in stage 4, our primary goal is economic mobility. A successful outcome, related to economic mobility, is a student income of greater than $30K per year.
 
Additionally, within each stage we measure recidivism rates, look at long-term employment, and completion of basic education. In the first stage of our model recidivism rates are over 80%. We stick with our students, however, and by the 4th stage of our model, recidivism rates for the same young people drop to less than 15%!
 
Through initial research on our program’s ROI, we found that in response to trust, hope, inclusion and economic mobility, we’re able to yield a 12-month ROI of over 231%. This metric is derived from the extensive cost savings we provide by keeping a student from returning to jail- a scenario that costs tax-payers well over $53,000 a year.
 
The lifetime savings are even more compelling. According to the Justice Policy Institute (JPI), the present value of saving a single juvenile from a life of crime and incarceration can range from $2.6 to $5.3 million dollars.
Through investing in social capital, inclusion, and economic mobility, we can provide an alternative path to death or jail and in doing so, we can save billions of dollars.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

In 2017, we are excited to begin our most ambitious year yet. In addition to our programmatic and operational goals, we will start a 3 year comprehensive campaign aimed at giving us the ability to open 2 more sites in Boston over the next 3 years, as well as the infrastructure needed to support our first out of state expansion to Philadelphia.
 
2017 will be the start of an opportunity for ICW to build a national brand that can reach beyond the walls of our gyms, a brand that changes narratives about individuals, about communities, and in turn fundamentally changes the way we, as a society, interact with each other. In 2017, we aim to take a giant step forward in our growth allowing us to better facilitate inclusion and bridge social capital to disrupt a system of segregation and isolation that plagues our cities leading to poverty, lack of access to opportunity, the need for the streets, and ultimately to violence.