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3-21 Foundation

 770 Massachusetts Avenue #390191
 Cambridge, MA 02139
[P] (617) 953-8607
[F] --
www.321foundation.org
[email protected]
Julie Messina
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 2010
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 27-2134490

LAST UPDATED: 11/07/2017
Organization DBA Learning Program Boston
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The 3-21 Foundation’s mission is to advance innovations in education and cognition for people with Down syndrome so they can be empowered to pursue their dreams.

We envision a world in which people with Down syndrome are valued, included and given the opportunity to lead independent and fulfilling lives.

Mission Statement

The 3-21 Foundation’s mission is to advance innovations in education and cognition for people with Down syndrome so they can be empowered to pursue their dreams.

We envision a world in which people with Down syndrome are valued, included and given the opportunity to lead independent and fulfilling lives.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $128,500.00
Projected Expense $128,500.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Learning Program Boston

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The 3-21 Foundation’s mission is to advance innovations in education and cognition for people with Down syndrome so they can be empowered to pursue their dreams.

We envision a world in which people with Down syndrome are valued, included and given the opportunity to lead independent and fulfilling lives.


Background Statement

Recognizing the need to improve educational programs and services for children with Down syndrome in the greater Boston area, the Learning Program Boston was launched in 2009 to bring the fruits of Down syndrome education research into practice. The Learning Program Boston is based on a program originally developed by the Down Syndrome Foundation (Orange County, CA), which has since become a nationally-recognized model for parent-focused educational intervention. This in turn is based on peer-reviewed, evidence-based research conducted and published by world-recognized leaders in the field of cognitive research for children with Down syndrome.

A pilot educational program was initiated in 2009 with just 10 families. Structured to include educational and social components, the program provided an opportunity for local families to connect and a forum for parent training and information exchange. An umbrella charity, the 3-21 Foundation was incorporated in 2009 and was granted 501(c)3 tax-exempt status in 2010.

The name “3-21 Foundation” was chosen because Down syndrome is caused by Trisomy 21, the presence of three copies of the 21st human chromosome. Trisomy 21 is therefore “the foundation of our Foundation” and the source of many of the gifts possessed and challenges faced, by those endowed with the extra chromosome.

Over the next five years, the Learning Program Boston quickly grew to include families not only from Massachusetts, but from the other New England states as well. Currently through all its educational programs, we serve approximately 100+ families from all over New England.

In 2013, the 3-21 Foundation formally launched its educational consulting practice to provide professional development workshops to educators on topics related to Down syndrome education. In conjunction, we began offering consultations to school teams on best practices for teaching and including students with Down syndrome. Our work with schools has included observing, evaluating and developing recommendations for programming. We also provide on-going support and coaching to guide the implementation of our recommendations.

Concurrent with the growth of its activities in the educational arena, the 3-21 Foundation began its work in the area of cognitive research. To support our interests, we initiated leadership positions advocating for legislative priorities in education and cognitive research for people with Down syndrome. In all that we do, we seek not to duplicate the efforts of other Down syndrome organizations but to augment or amplify them. Our work and positions are guided by our mission of empowering people with Down syndrome and their families.

We continue to work very closely with our affiliate partner, Down Syndrome Foundation (Orange County, CA) and our local Down syndrome advocacy group, the Massachusetts Down Syndrome Congress (MDSC), collaborating on programming, research projects and the provision of educational support services.


Impact Statement

Our Purposes
  • Empower families to be effective advocates for their loved ones with Down syndrome
  • To serve as a source of information regarding educational best practices, current research and effective teaching strategies that promote the independence and inclusion of people with Down syndrome
  • To further the understanding of cognition, cognitive enhancement and cognitive therapies, and to advance viable therapies for cognitive enhancement in people with Down syndrome
  • To advocate for improved education, community inclusion and independence for people with Down syndrome to enable them to be fully contributing members in their community
  • To protect and promote the rights of people with Down syndrome
  • To collaborate with other Down syndrome groups and community partners at the local, state, national and international level
  • To better educate the public about Down syndrome
Spring 2013 culminated in the designation of awards for two individuals that have played key roles in the development of the Learning Program Boston. Our President was awarded the Community Partnership Award from the Federation for Children with Special Needs for having “significant impact” in the community. Also, our lead special educator received the Outstanding Educator Award from the Massachusetts Down Syndrome Congress for her work in developing our student programs. Three years later in 2016, our President was awarded this same Award for her leadership of the Foundation’s educational activities. In April 2016, the City of Cambridge passed a resolutioncommending our President and the Foundation for improving educational outcomes for children and youth with Down syndrome.

Needs Statement

As a non-profit, we are heavily reliant on grant funding and individual charitable gifts. Donations cover a significant percentage of our educational programming expenses, allowing us to offer tuition and consulting services at a greatly reduced cost to families in need.  Your financial support is vital to our ability to provide high-quality educational programming.

We are also looking for scientifically-proficient volunteers to help further build our program in cognition.  For more information about volunteering, please contact us.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
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Organization Categories

  1. Diseases Disorders & Medical Disciplines - Down's Syndrome
  2. Education - Special Education
  3. Human Services - Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Learning Program Boston

The Learning Program Boston (LPB) is an educational program committed to helping students with Down syndrome succeed. An affiliate-partner of the Learning Program™, a nationally-recognized model for parent-focused intervention developed by the Down Syndrome Foundation (Orange County, CA) this program is grounded on evidence-based approaches to teaching students with Down syndrome established by world-recognized leaders in cognitive research. Our program serves as a platform for sharing instructional strategies, resources and activities to improve academic outcomes for students with Down syndrome, equipping families with the knowledge and tools to work effectively at home and at school.
Budget  --
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Down Syndrome
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

Our program utilizes a three-pronged approach to teach, mentor and coach.

  • Teaching: academic workshops for parents and caregivers feature developmentally appropriate instructional topics that build upon each other sequentially.
  • Mentoring: wraparound workshops help parents and caregivers create a positive educational environment at home and develop a collaborative working relationship with their school team.
  • Coaching: coaching sessions provide hands-on instructional modeling to help parents & caregivers work directly with their student.

We offer an Elementary Program (Grades K-5) and a Middle School Program (Grades 6-8).

Elementary Program Academic Workshops are comprised of Levels 1 to 4 and are focused on developing foundational learning skills in reading, writing and math. Parents and caregivers attend monthly adult-only classes on a Saturday morning from September to June. Coupled on the same morning are our (optional) Wraparound workshops. Elementary families also attend Curriculum Days for hands-on coaching with their student 
 
Middle School Program The WrapAround workshops form the core of this program and parents and caregivers attend adult-only classes on a Saturday morning from September to June. Parents and caregivers are encouraged to drop-in on any Level 1-4 Academic Workshop for a “refresher” as needed. Middle School families also attend Adventure Days with their student. These are supported events, held at different locations within the community and are structured to help parents support their young adult develop skills for independent living, self-regulation and self-advocacy.
Program Long-Term Success  Spring 2013 culminated in the designation of awards for two individuals that have played key roles in the development of the Learning Program Boston. Our President was awarded the Community Partnership Award from the Federation for Children with Special Needs for having “significant impact” in the community. Also, our lead special educator received the Outstanding Educator Award from the Massachusetts Down Syndrome Congress for her work in developing our student programs. Three years later in 2016, our President was awarded this same award for her leadership of the Foundation’s educational activities. In April 2016, the City of Cambridge passed a resolution commending our President and the Foundation for improving educational outcomes for children and youth with Down syndrome.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  Spring 2013 culminated in the designation of awards for two individuals that have played key roles in the development of the Learning Program Boston. Our President was awarded the Community Partnership Award from the Federation for Children with Special Needs for having “significant impact” in the community. Also, our lead special educator received the Outstanding Educator Award from the Massachusetts Down Syndrome Congress for her work in developing our student programs. Three years later in 2016, our President was awarded this same award for her leadership of the Foundation’s educational activities. In April 2016, the City of Cambridge passed a resolution commending our President and the Foundation for improving educational outcomes for children and youth with Down syndrome.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Julie Messina
CEO Term Start Sept 2009
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 8
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 1
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Julie Lim Messina
Board Chair Company Affiliation The 3-21 Foundation
Board Chair Term July 2016 - June 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Pamela Booth The 3-21 Foundation Voting
Mr. Christopher Messina Body1 Voting
Ms Julie Messina The 3-21 Foundation Voting
Mr. Charles Thompson Travelers Insurance Company Voting
Mr. Nicos Vekiarides EMC-Dell Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 1 (Latin)
Gender Female: 2
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 80%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $128,500.00
Projected Expense $128,500.00
Form 990s

2017 Form 990

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $176,480 $197,498 $156,629
Total Expenses $181,881 $158,738 $145,824

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $52,250 $73,469 $59,804
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $124,228 $124,027 $96,823
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2 $2 $2
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $150,124 $132,327 $128,016
Administration Expense $31,757 $26,411 $17,808
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.97 1.24 1.07
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 83% 88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $103,169 $110,353 $72,593
Current Assets $67,696 $70,247 $51,843
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $33,217 $40,000 $41,000
Total Net Assets $69,952 $70,353 $31,593

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.04 1.76 1.26

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990-EZs. Contributions from foundation and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. Please note, the net asset amount for FY17 in the charts above is per the total asset and total liability data found in the FY17 990-EZ file.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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