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Beyond Conflict

 30 Winter Street, 7th Floor
 Boston, MA 02108
[P] (617) 9457573
[F] (617) 9459231
www.beyondconflictint.org
[email protected]
Barbara Hayes
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INCORPORATED: 2010
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 27-2008529

LAST UPDATED: 12/22/2016
Organization DBA Beyond Conflict
Former Names Project on Justice in Times of Transition (2013)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

Our mission is to promote peace and reconciliation by connecting, inspiring, and empowering diverse communities and leaders.

We create powerful new frameworks to address the persistent societal challenges of conflict, repression, and difference engaging the shared experience of global leaders and effectively applying innovations in science, culture, and media.

Mission Statement

Our mission is to promote peace and reconciliation by connecting, inspiring, and empowering diverse communities and leaders.

We create powerful new frameworks to address the persistent societal challenges of conflict, repression, and difference engaging the shared experience of global leaders and effectively applying innovations in science, culture, and media.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $4,250,000.00
Projected Expense $4,111,712.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Beyond Conflict Innovation Lab
  • Building an Inclusive Boston
  • Global Initiatives

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Our mission is to promote peace and reconciliation by connecting, inspiring, and empowering diverse communities and leaders.

We create powerful new frameworks to address the persistent societal challenges of conflict, repression, and difference engaging the shared experience of global leaders and effectively applying innovations in science, culture, and media.


Background Statement

 

Who We Are

For 25 years, Beyond Conflict has created innovative approaches to peace and reconciliation in deeply divided societies around the world. Through over 100 initiatives with more than 75 countries, we continue to partner with global leaders and communities to forge new pathways for progress in peace talks, transitions to democracy, and national reconciliations.

Putting Experience And Innovation To Work For Peace

Beyond Conflict is widely acknowledged as the leader in catalyzing research in behavioral science to more effectively address social conflict. First to recognize the power of insights from neuroscience and the behavioral science, we have launched groundbreaking research on discrimination against the Roma in Europe, developed partnerships and inspired related initiatives with an extensive network of scientists at leading universities and NGOs, and are developing The Mindset Indicators, key metrics measuring trust and inclusion. The urgent need for new approaches, programs and tools has led to key briefings with the World Bank, the UN Envoy for Syrian Peace Talks, U.S. State Department, White House, and elsewhere. 

Our Impact 

  • First to convene leaders from all political parties in Northern Ireland, the eventual signers of the Good Friday Peace Accord, launching a decade of collaborative engagement 

  • Catalyzed the field of Transitional Justice, a framework to redress legacies of massive human rights abuse now standard in conflict resolution and human rights practice
  • Pioneered the ‘Shared Experience’ methodology, applying the power of the experience and lessons learned from global leaders and activists
  • Introduced the concept of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to leaders in post-Apartheid South Africa
  • Established the Beyond Conflict Innovation Lab -- building a cross-sectoral research and practice community to applying insights from brain science to social conflict

 Our break-through convenings for scientists, policymakers, practitioners and funders have inspired new research directions and collaborations:

  •  Neuroscience And Social Conflict: Identifying New Approaches For The 21st Century (2012)
  • Dehumanization in Conflict (2013)
  • Norms, Narratives, And Neurons (2014)
  • Neuroscience and Peacebuilding: Reframing How We Think About Conflict and Prejudice (2015)
  • New Perspectives On Social Conflict (2015)
  • Building An Inclusive Boston | A New Conversation On Race, Bias & Divided Communities (2016)

Impact Statement

Accomplishments

  • Completed a comprehensive strategic planning process. Building New Frameworks For Peace | Our 2025 Roadmap charts our 10-year vision for expanding our work and impact at the nexus of neuroscience and social conflict
  • Convened a sixth Beyond Conflict Innovation Lab break-through conference - Building An Inclusive Boston | A New Conversation On Race, Bias & Divided Communities. Over 180 participants learned from global leaders who have addressed deep divisions in their own communities - South Africa, Northern Ireland, Guatemala - and heard insights from behavioral scientists to create a new framework for addressing these challenges 
  • Completed Phase I of groundbreaking research/practice initiative on anti-Roma bias in Europe. Developed blatant dehumanization scale, first cross-culturally validated, predictive set of measures of anti-Roma prejudice, and applied it to the design/measurement of educational approaches
  • Convened Cuban-Americans in Washington DC, Boston, and Miami to explore pathways forward for reconciliation
  • Launched the Beyond Conflict Innovation Partners leadership donor program, connecting donors with global leaders, activists, scientists, and other social change innovators.

2017 Goals

  • Build A More Inclusive Boston. Engage a wide spectrum of Boston on the challenges of race, bias and divided communities to design new innovative approaches to inclusion
  • Help Global Leaders And Communities Develop Peaceful Strategies For Managing Social Change. Ongoing engagement in Cuba, the U.S., and the Middle East, addressing the challenges of changing social realities
  • Award 3 New Beyond Conflict Innovation Fellowships for work at the nexus of neuroscience and social conflict to: develop behavioral mindset metrics to measure trust, fear, & exclusion, reduce and understand the impact of hate-speech, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, and other forms of bias and discrimination


Needs Statement

  • Unrestricted support and investment in our growing mission and potential for innovative, transformative impact on social conflict and division by building our administrative and programmatic capacity
  • Building communications infrastructure, including staffing, technology, message delivery and online and other content development 
  • Beyond Conflict Innovation Fellowship support ($150,000 per Fellowship), funding the science & practice focused work of our Innovation Fellows on identifying, addressing bias & dehumanization, the effect of hate speech on growing global Islamophobia & anti-Semitism, and the impact of displacement on Syrian refugees and science informed approaches to preventing radicalization, and evaluating and measuring program impact, 
  • A growing global community engaged with our work 

CEO Statement

Since our founding in 1992, Beyond Conflict has engaged in groundbreaking global partnerships for peace and reconciliation in over 100 initiatives involving leaders from more than 75 countries including Northern Ireland, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Cuba and elsewhere. Now well into our third decade, we continue to draw upon our many years of global engagement, trailblazing, and field building to reimagine our vision and mission in exciting ways­. We are now applying cutting-edge science to our decades of work with global leaders and communities to address the problems of conflict, repression, and difference to develop new, innovative, and transformative frameworks for peace.

We are catalyzing revolutionary research in neuroscience and the behavioral sciences, and linking them powerfully to our far-reaching network of global leaders -- in civil society and government, activist communities, science, education, innovation, culture, and media. We continue to build out-of-the-box partnerships to deepen our understanding, improve practice, and measure effectiveness. Most important, we are imagining new ways to reduce violence, division, and promote more peaceful and resilient communities.

Our goals are ambitious. But honestly, there is not a moment to lose, the stakes are just too high.

Innovation | Science offers key tools that can be applied across disciplines to better understand the human dynamics of conflict, improve how we approach conflict, repression, and difference -- and measure our impact and effectiveness.

Reach | We are amplifying our reach by engaging and educating new audiences and generations of leaders. By convening diverse groups and using online platforms to educate, inspire, and engage, we help leaders and divided communities open minds and imagine the impossible.

Build For The Future | We are laying down the foundation to sustain and scale our work for the future -- and establish a center for innovation for leaders and communities to come together, creating an environment in which perspectives can be heard, alliances forged, new ideas generated, and peace building can take place.

Since our very beginning, our international partners have shown us the true meaning of courage by engaging and being willing to consider the impossible -- at transformative moments in world history. Help us honor their courage and trust by working with us over the coming decade to be nimble, creative, focused. Let’s innovate together for peace.

With anticipation,
Tim Phillips
CEO & Co-Founder 

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

INTERNATIONAL
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- Harbor Islands
City of Boston- West Roxbury
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
NATIONAL
--

Organization Categories

  1. International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security - International Peace and Security
  2. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community Coalitions
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Leadership Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Beyond Conflict Innovation Lab

The Beyond Conflict Innovation Lab, a collaborative community of top-tier scientists and practitioners, is bridging the gap between science and practice. We are catalyzing research in behavioral science to better understand the unconscious processes that shape our thoughts and attitudes and building the tools to effectively and measurably address the urgent challenges to peace and stability in the 21st Century.  Current conflict resolution efforts are rooted in the deeply flawed assumption that human behaviors and decisions are purely rational. A growing body of scientific research demonstrates just the opposite, revealing the primary role unconscious processes play in shaping our behaviors and decision-making both as individuals and communities. It is time to update our framework and strategies to better reflect a more accurate understanding of what drives humans into conflict -- and toward peace.

Budget  $15,000,000.00
Category  International, Foreign Affairs & National Security, General/Other International Peace & Security
Population Served General/Unspecified US& International
Program Short-Term Success 
1. The Mindset Indicators | Developing Measurement Metrics
  • For short-term goals, see Phase I & II from previous question. 
Program Long-Term Success 

YEARS 1–2 | CATALYZING A STRATEGIC ECOSYSTEM

Build research/practice community | Launch The Mindset Indicators | Deploy Innovation Fellow teams on key challenges (i.e. Dehumanization, Islamophobia, Racism) | Pilot training programs & curricula | Convene annual Research Innovation Conversation | MEL benchmarks 

YEARS 3–4 | GROWTH & MEASURING/IMPACT IN THE WORLD  Build and grow research/practice collaborations - 20 Innovation Fellows/Year 4 | Secure institutional commitments for programming and training | Develop and expand content across platforms | Launch evaluation, metrics on field building and improved inclusion/trust outcomes

YEARS 5–6 | SCALING /MOBILIZING RESOURCES FOR CHANGE 500,000+ engaged globally | 50+ scientists at top universities applying research to social challenges | 1 million+ people reached via traditional and social media, blogs, etc. | Measure impact of framework and toolkit | Long-term plan for ongoing scaling and implementation

Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
  • Launched the Mindset Indicators planning process and constructed a pathway forward. 
  • Established a partnership with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology SaxeLab. 
  • Hosted four major convenings on the nexus of neuroscience and social conflict. 
 

Building an Inclusive Boston

Beyond Conflict is engaging an extraordinary coalition of a full spectrum of the Boston community ⎯ educators, activists, artists, law enforcement, scientists, leaders from the private sector and government. We are beginning the honest, open, and sometimes difficult, conversations needed to address the challenges of race, bias, and divided communities, and listening deeply to one another, and trying to quietly hear what it is that we may have been missing.  Beyond Conflict is applying insights from behavioral sciences and drawing upon the real world experiences of our extraordinary network of global leaders, practitioners, and policymakers, to curate transformative conversations to work together to shape innovative approaches and programs. We will work together to build a more inclusive and equitable community, collaboratively building the evidence for better understanding, measuring, and addressing the underlying drivers of racial discrimination, prejudice, social inclusion.

Budget  $5,000,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Community Development, General/Other
Population Served US
Program Short-Term Success 

 

  • Establish the Civic Forum, an overarching structure for parallel and overlapping dialogues, convenings, and programs designed to build alliances and partnerships among peers within and across sectors to engage the full Greater Boston community in understanding and engaging on issues of inclusion. 
  • Convene and engage current leaders across the leading cultural, education, religious, private sector, philanthropic, non-profit and governmental institutions to build coalitions horizontally across sectors and support efforts to engage vertically within institutions and think creatively about the role of institutions in social change.
  • Mentor and support a diverse, cross-community cohort of leading voices from key constituencies including the private and non-profit sectors, law enforcement community, activists, artists, journalists, and political leaders. 

 

Program Long-Term Success 

 

  • The full spectrum of the Boston community will be engaged to catalyze conversations and ideas for action. We will bring a new lens linking the experience of global leaders to insights from science. By framing a dialogue for the full Boston community about race, diversity, and social inclusion, we will bring new voices, global perspectives, and transformative frameworks to this urgent moment of social challenge
  • Develop The Mindset Indicators, an interconnected set of behavioral metrics to measure inclusion and trust
  • Will develop a pilot certificate program for newly appointed police officers, members of the Greater Boston community, and Suffolk University students to learn together about issues of race and resilience and apply a new lens for understanding these challenges

 

Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
  • Established partnerships with key institutions across the City of Boston, including the Office of the Mayor, City of Boston; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Humanities and Social Science; The SaxeLab at MIT; Boston Police Academy; Lesley University; UMass Boston; Suffolk University; Emerson University; ArtsEmerson; The Boston Children’s Choir; The Boston’s Children’s Museum; Museum of Fine Arts; Institute of Contemporary Arts; the Rose Art Museum; The Museum of Science; The Trustees of Reservations; WGBH (Nova & NovaLabs); and Color Magazine. 

Global Initiatives

Beyond Conflict creates innovative frameworks to peace and reconciliation in deeply divided societies around the world. We have partnered with global leaders and communities in over 100 initiatives with more than 75 countries, including South Africa, Northern Ireland, Bahrain, Israel, Kosovo, Guatemala, Sri Lanka, Cuba, and elsewhere, to forge new pathways for progress in peace talks, transitions to democracy, and national reconciliation. We apply the experience of global leaders and insights from behavioral science to build strategic partnerships with our extraordinary global network of leaders, colleagues, and scientists to help prepare communities for constructive and peaceful ways forward. Engagements vary, lasting from one to ten years.

Budget  $4,700,000.00
Category  International, Foreign Affairs & National Security, General/Other International Peace & Security
Population Served US& International
Program Short-Term Success  Our global response programming aims to create new pathways for expressing contention, both in the Middle East region and in the divided Cuban-American/Cuban community. 
Program Long-Term Success 
Over the course of three years, Beyond Conflict will work with the Cuban and Cuban-American communities and in the Middle East region to:
  • Envision a structure to strengthen the norms of inclusion and equitable engagement.
  • Sustain norms of disagreement without violence. 
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 

We have played a significant role in catalyzing the unfolding historic change in relations between the U.S. and Cuba. Specific accomplishments in our Cuba work include:

 

  • Facilitating the entry of the Pope as a neutral facilitator, convener, and guarantor in the negotiations between the U.S. and Cuba
  • Nurturing a close relationship with the Cuban Ambassador to South Africa, and others at the highest levels of the Cuban government through our South African partners. 
  • Helping Cuban-American leaders gain an understanding of the underlying dynamics of change and how to manage the evolving relationship between their community and the Cuban government and people on the island
  • Advising U.S. officials involved in the policy shift and helping them orchestrate the change in a manner that accounts for, and addresses deeply-held convictions and fears on both sides.

 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Timothy Phillips
CEO Term Start Mar 1992
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Timothy Phillips is a pioneer in the field of conflict resolution and reconciliation and co-founder of Beyond Conflict, a global initiative that is internationally recognized for contributions to the field of transitional justice in post-communist Europe. Using the unique approach of shared experience, Beyond Conflict has helped catalyze the peace and reconciliation processes in several nations, including Northern Ireland, El Salvador, and South Africa. Under Timothy's leadership, Beyond Conflict launched a partnership with MIT to conduct cutting-edge research on the relationship between neuroscience and social conflict. Tim has advised the United Nations, the U.S. Department of State, and the Council of Europe and has been a frequent speaker in national and international forums, including the Council on Foreign Relations and the U.S. Congress. He helped launch and serves on the Advisory Committee of the Club of Madrid, a forum for about 90 former democratic heads of state and government.
Co-CEO Ms. Barbara Hayes
Co-CEO Term Start Nov 2016
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience Barbara Hayes joined Beyond Conflict as the Director of Development and Strategic Partnerships in 2015 after serving as the Director of Development at Wellesley Centers for Women. Ms. Hayes has extensive experience in fundraising and strategic organizational development. In 1991, she was elected the first president of the Board of Trustees of Bay Farm Montessori Academy and later served as their Director of External Relations from 2006-2009. Ms. Hayes has also served as the Special Projects Coordinator for the International Women’s Tribune Center in New York and as a Consultant for Women in Development. Ms. Hayes has a BA from Hampshire College, a Certification for Secondary Level Social Sciences from Northeastern University and a Masters in Education from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Lee-Or Ankori-Karlinsky Senior Program Officer --
Abigail Dusseldorp Program Officer --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 2
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Israeli
Gender Female: 3
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 10
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Davis Weinstock
Board Chair Company Affiliation Mercury, Clark & Weinstock
Board Chair Term Nov 2016 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
George Biddle World Connect Voting
Susan Donahue Health Leads Voting
Ben Harburg Avra Commodities Voting
Rona Kiley Teach First Voting
Fred Lawrence Phi Beta Kappa Society Voting
Wendy Luers Foundation for a Civil Society Voting
Sarah Lukas Edelstein & Company, LLP Voting
Carl Marci Nielsen Consumer Research Voting
Tim Phillips Beyond Conflict Exofficio
Irma Tyler-Wood Ki Thoughtbridge Voting
Davis Weinstock Mercury, Clark & Weinstock Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
William Alford Harvard Law School NonVoting
Jose Maria Argueta Organization of the American States NonVoting
Oscar Arias Former President and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Costa Rica NonVoting
Bernard Aronson ACON Investments NonVoting
Paul Arthur University of Ulster NonVoting
Hanan Ashrawi Palestinian Initiative for the Promotion of Global Dialogue and Democracy NonVoting
Brian Atwood University of Minnesota NonVoting
Kurt Biedenkopf Former Minister President of Saxony, Germany NonVoting
John Biehl Organization for American States NonVoting
Thomas Blanton US National Security Archive NonVoting
Alex Boraine Truth and Reconciliation Commission, South Africa NonVoting
Martin Butora Institute for Public Affairs, Slovakia NonVoting
Antonia Chayes Tufts University NonVoting
Naomi Chazan Former Deputy Speaker of the Knesset, Israel NonVoting
Aldo Civico Rutgers University NonVoting
John Coatsworth Columbia University NonVoting
Jorge Dominguez Harvard University Exofficio
Nir Eisikovitz Suffolk University NonVoting
Roger Errera Senior Member of Conseil d’Etat, France NonVoting
Jose Maria Figueres Former President, Costa Rica NonVoting
Richard Goldstone Former Chief Justice, Constitutional Court of South Africa and Former First Chief Prosecutor of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda, South Afric NonVoting
Michail Gorbachev Former Secretary General of the USSR and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Russia NonVoting
Nik Gowing BBC News NonVoting
Deborah Harding Open Society Institute NonVoting
Maurice Hayes Senator, Republic of Ireland NonVoting
Father Bryan Hehir Harvard University NonVoting
Stephen Heintz Rockefeller Brothers Fund NonVoting
Bruce Hitchner Tufts University NonVoting
James Hoge Human Rights Watch NonVoting
Ellen Hume University of Massachusetts NonVoting
Baroness Margaret Jay House of Lords, United Kingdom NonVoting
Branka Kaselj Community Foundation Slagalica, Croatia NonVoting
Herbert Kelman Harvard University NonVoting
James LeMoyne Former Special Advisor to the Secretary General of the United Nations on Colombia, United States NonVoting
Frank Loy Former US Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs NonVoting
Wendy Luers Foundation for a Civil Society NonVoting
Ram Manikkalingam University of Amsterdam; Dialogue Advisory Group NonVoting
Roelf Meyer Former Minister of Constitutional Affairs, and Former Chief Negotiator in the talks to end Apartheid, South Africa NonVoting
Adam Michnik Solidarity Movement and Editor-in-Chief of Gazeta Wyborzca, Poland NonVoting
Martha Minow Harvard Law School NonVoting
Eric Nonacs William J. Clinton Foundation NonVoting
Joseph Nye Harvard University Exofficio
Diminitra Petrova Equal Rights Trust, Hungary NonVoting
Tanja Petrovar Oxford Leadership Academy, Serbia NonVoting
John Podesta Center for American Progress, Former Chief of Staff for President Clinton and Counselor to President Barack Obama NonVoting
Samantha Power United Nations NonVoting
Steve Reifenberg Notre Dame University NonVoting
Alan Riding New York Times NonVoting
Araceli Ruano Former Senior Policy Advisor to Al Gore’s Presidential Campaign NonVoting
Nancy Rubin Adopt a Mine Field NonVoting
Karel Schwarzenberg Former Foreign Minister, Czech Republic NonVoting
Carolyn Seely Wiener Attorney at Law NonVoting
John Shattuck Central European University NonVoting
Adele Simmons Chicago Metropolis 2020 NonVoting
Anne-Marie Slaughter New America Foundation NonVoting
Jon Snow Channel 4 News, Great Britain NonVoting
Dick Spring Former Tánaiste and Foreign Minister, Republic of Ireland NonVoting
Rose Styron Harvard University NonVoting
Saul Suster Senior Advisor to President Flores, El Salvador NonVoting
Sherman Teichman Tufts University NonVoting
Jan Urban Chapter 77 Movement, Czech Republic NonVoting
Lawrence Weschler New York University NonVoting
Tim Wirth United Nations Foundation NonVoting
Jose Zalaquett National Commission for Truth and Reconciliation, Chile NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 45%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Finance
  • Governance and Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

   

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $4,250,000.00
Projected Expense $4,111,712.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $761,475 $882,207 $816,390
Total Expenses $783,448 $796,213 $903,206

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $324,065 $512,412
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- $324,065 $512,412
Individual Contributions $746,347 $552,968 $297,158
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $15,128 $5,174 $6,820
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $447,847 $560,379 $664,198
Administration Expense $231,494 $145,307 $151,160
Fundraising Expense $104,107 $90,527 $87,848
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.97 1.11 0.90
Program Expense/Total Expenses 57% 70% 74%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 14% 10% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $190,954 $245,943 $174,285
Current Assets $169,362 $240,119 $170,958
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $33,164 $66,180 $80,516
Total Net Assets $157,790 $179,763 $93,769

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.11 3.63 2.12

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The increasing requests for our partnership and advice on how to apply these insights are far-reaching and urgent. To meet the growing demand and realize this moment of opportunity, we are seeking strategic growth investment. Our projected budgets anticipate carefully phased growth to strategically expand and scale our research and program capacity and to build overall administrative and fundraising infrastructure. We will allocate expenses across our four strategic program areas Research, Translation, Training, and Communications to build the capacity and infrastructure for a growing, stable financial foundation for the organization, sustaining us far beyond the scope of our initial strategic growth funding. Three primary revenue streams will grow significantly over time: grants from institutional funders; individual philanthropy; and earned revenue from consulting, fee-for-service activities (consulting, in-person and online leadership training), products (curricula, etc.), and intellectual property and technologies.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

For twenty-five years, Beyond Conflict has worked with global leaders and communities to create transformative frameworks addressing the challenges of conflict and division, often in places where peaceful change seemed impossible. However, we know that meaningful change is possible, and we have seen it time and again in countries around the world ⎯ in Northern Ireland, South Africa, Kosovo, Sri Lanka, Cuba, and countless others.

Most current efforts to address conflict and division are inadequate because they are based on the flawed assumption that human behavior is purely rational. Scientific research demonstrates just the opposite, revealing the powerful role unconscious processes play in shaping our behavior and decision-making as individuals and communities. By ignoring what science is illuminating with increasing clarity and specificity about the human brain, along with its promise of more effective tools and measurable approaches, we are squandering valuable resources and time. But, most urgently, we are risking human lives.

We have launched the Beyond Conflict Innovation Lab to bridge this gap between science and practice. We will update our framework for understanding conflict, creating an evidence-based toolkit to address these challenges and accurately measure impact. Evidence from behavioral science research has the power to unlock the resources to fundamentally - and enduringly - transform the paradigm on how global communities and leaders understand and address the challenges facing our increasingly interconnected and diverse societies. Institutions of every type and size - schools and universities, businesses, cultural institutions, governments, and communities - are struggling to manage the issues of difference, bias, and the beliefs that separate us and drive us into conflict. 

The Beyond Conflict Innovation Lab is at the vanguard of science and practice, catalyzing scientific research on what drives humans into conflict -- and toward peace. By significantly growing this work, we will bring this body of evidence to scale, creating a new, transformative framework and innovative tools that more effectively address social conflict and build durable, inclusive societies. Our goals are to:

I. Pioneer a new understanding of what drives humans into conflict and toward peace based on insights from behavioral science and real world experience

I. Measurably improve the impact of conflict management strategies by creating evidence-based approaches and tools

II. Connect, expand and motivate broad audiences to catalyze increased awareness and engagement

We hope to catalyze and inspire the widest possible array of partners applying and expanding this powerful framework, and have already begun to identify and build relationships with leaders who can leverage their influence in their own communities to most effectively spark new conversations to build this new body of innovative research, programs, and tools. The single most meaningful measure of our success will be an exponentially growing network of research labs, academic departments, governments, funding institutions, and innovative initiatives across sectors, partners collaborating with us to grow, apply, and measure the impact of this transformative lens.

With strategic investment, we will increase our research, program and administrative capacities to incubate and grow our work. Establishing an online community will provide resources and networks for global leaders, practitioners, policymakers, scientists and broader audiences, now and long into the future. By bridging the gap between science and practice, we are building tools to effectively and measurably address the urgent challenges to peace and stability in the 21st Century.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

VISION & STRATEGY

The Beyond Conflict Innovation Lab is at the vanguard of science and practice, unearthing new scientific evidence and effective approaches for addressing global conflict challenges. Scientists and practitioners work in partnership to build the research evidence for a more accurate and nuanced understanding of what drives humans toward and away from conflict and violence, an innovative toolkit for addressing key challenges, and accurate measurement tools to measure progress and impact.

To scale this work, we will strategically grow our research, program and administrative capacity by applying the following strategies:

RESEARCH | Engage a multidisciplinary community of scientists to catalyze research focused on social conflict

TRANSLATION | Reimagine the toolkit for policy and practice by developing evidence-based programs and measurement tools applying insights from science

TRAINING | Develop curricula and training programs for global leaders, scientists, practitioners, policymakers and civil society

COMMUNICATIONS | Engage and inspire new, diverse audiences

We will continue to host curated convenings to spark dialogue and cross-fertilize ideas. By developing a comprehensive communications strategy and cross-platform visual and written content to engage a broad online community, build networks, and share resources to build greater awareness and knowledge.

Our growing community of Beyond Conflict Innovation Fellows is at the heart of the work of the Innovation Lab, and are selected from an emerging generation of scholars and practitioners eager to explore bold, new questions at the nexus of scientific research and real world practice. With oversight and mentorship from the Beyond Conflict leadership, program staff, and global network, our Innovation Fellows are developing new solutions to the challenges of social conflict -- and bringing scientific rigor to a field that has often eluded accurate measurement.
 
A very promising example of the tools that will be developed through this applied research approach is The Mindset Indicators, a project in development, growing out of our initiative, Building An Inclusive Boston | A New Conversation On Race, Bias & Divided Communities. The Mindset Indicators is a collaborative effort between scientists, practitioners, and community leaders in our networks to develop and evaluate a range of interconnected behavioral metrics.

By establishing accurate measurement tools for inclusion and discrimination in Boston, leaders and decision-makers will gain measurable data and research insights that can be applied to identify high-risk neighborhoods, fine-tune program design, determine the best allocation of precious funds, and measure impact - with far reaching implications for other cities and communities addressing these challenges.

The increasing requests for our partnership and advice on how to apply these insights are far-reaching and urgent. In addition to those listed below, we have received numerous additional requests from international civil society organizations, U.S. museums, universities, media partners, and many others:

The World Bank | Building Inclusive Global Communities - Applying Behavioral Insights in Twelve Countries Around The World

The U.N. Envoy For The Syrian Peace Talks | Reshaping A Narrative For Gender Inclusion & Healing A Nation

The Office Of The Quartet, Jerusalem | A New Framework For Resolving The Two Key Intractable Problems ⏤ The Temple Mount & Right of Return For Refugees

The U.S. State Department | New Terrain In U.S./Cuban Relations ⏤ Understanding Confirmation Bias & Narratives Of Loss

The Gates Foundation | Diversity, Inclusion & Leadership

The City of Boston | Building An Inclusive Boston - A New Conversation on Race, Bias & Divided Communities

Sandy Hook Promise | The Role of Sacred Values & Social Networks in Reducing Gun Violence

   

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Beyond Conflict is a highly effective organization with extraordinary global reach. Governed by an engaged and growing Board of Directors, we have been preparing for significant organizational growth for the past several years. In addition, Beyond Conflict has an extensive network of global leaders and colleagues across sectors that have been key to our decades of successful engagement around the world. By establishing the Beyond Conflict Innovation Lab as an organizational and catalytic hub for science and practice innovation, our network has grown in recent years to include leading partners in science and innovation. We have unique and direct access at the very highest levels to:

  • International leaders, policymakers and practitioners in global diplomacy and conflict resolution, including the White House, State Department, United Nations, World Bank
  • Leading academic institutions, laboratories and scientists — at MIT, Stanford, Harvard, UPenn and elsewhere
  • Leaders in civil society and activist communities; Innovation technology leaders such as Nielsen Consumer Research, cultural institutions, and media partners
Our detailed strategy envisions infrastructure growth in targeted areas of scientific research, program, finance, fundraising, communications and earned revenue. By strategically phasing this growth, we will scale the scope of our research, program and technical advisory/consulting capacity, and add to office and meeting facilities to build a strong, stable, sustainable financial foundation and program infrastructure. We anticipate growing revenue streams from institutional grants, philanthropic giving, and earned revenue from consulting, intellectual property, and technology development.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

The single most meaningful measure of our success will be an exponentially growing network of research labs, academic departments, governments, funding institutions, and innovative initiatives across sectors, partners collaborating with us to grow, apply, and measure the impact of this transformative lens.

In addition, benchmarks will be strategically selected to demonstrate: 1) The growth and caliber of the scientific evidence, and 2) The effectiveness of global leaders and communities in addressing enduring social challenges by better managing our increasing diversity and changing stressors to become more inclusive and equitable. These indicators will be tracked to demonstrate our effectiveness in meeting core goals of establishing a recognized field of applied scientific research, influencing policy and practice, engaging broad audiences, and our overall impact in building more inclusive communities. Such indicators will include:

Randomized controlled trials (to build the body of evidence and ­establish efficacy of tools and programs)

Level and number of collaborations and scientists engaged

Peer-reviewed publications

Conference participation and convenings

Trainings conducted, curricula validated

Predictive measurement tools, programs and technologies developed that measurably and positively improve research and impact outcomes

Increased engagement by leading universities

High-level briefings, policy recommendations adopted and consultancies requested

Social media and online engagement

Media coverage, and other benchmarks 

We have identified the following Phase I growth plan that with significant strategic investment is achievable in six years:

YEARS 1–2 | CATALYZING A STRATEGIC ECOSYSTEM

§ Create Ecosystem, program support across four strategic areas

§ Build Research/Practice Community, expand to ten Innovation Fellows

§ Implementation, Translation Projects, i.e. The Mindset Indicators, interconnected behavioral metrics for inclusion/trust

§ Deploy Innovation Fellow Teams on Targeted Challenges (i.e. Dehumanization, Islamophobia, Racism)

§ Develop Pilot Training Program(s), webinars, curricula

§ Establish Key Research, Translation and Training Partnerships

§ Convene Annual Research Innovation Conversation (100+ participants across sectors)

§ Determine Benchmarks and Metrics for MEL

YEARS 3–4 | GROWTH & MEASURING - IMPACT IN THE WORLD

§ Build and Grow Research/Practice Collaborations To Address Social Challenges | 15 Innovation Fellows/Year 3; 20/Year 4

§ Secure Institutional Commitments for Programming Initiatives and Training Programs

§ Develop and Expand Content/Outreach across platforms for cross-sectoral community, networks among scientists, practitioners, policymakers

§ Launch Evaluation, metrics on field building and improved inclusion/trust outcomes

YEARS 5–6 | SCALING ­- MOBILIZING NEW RESOURCES FOR CHANGE

§ Global Leaders and Communities | 500,000+ engaged thru multiple channels: events, partnerships, live and online training, policy advisories

§ Scientific Research Community | 50+ scientists at top universities applying research to social challenges; 70 research/practice initiatives launched applying new tools to 5 challenges; 100+ articles in peer-reviewed publications; Fellows presented work at 500+ conferences; Mindset Indicators adopted in 10 cities

§ Broader Audiences | 1 million+ people reached via traditional and social media, blogs, online platform, books, events

§ Measure and Assess the effectiveness, reach, and impact of the framework and toolkit

§ Implement Long-Term Plan for ongoing scaling and implementation

 
 

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

This is a new and transformative approach, that we are only beginning to develop. First to recognize the power of scientific insights, we have launched groundbreaking research on discrimination against the Roma in Europe, developed partnerships and inspired related initiatives with an extensive network of scientists at leading universities and NGOs, held briefings at the World Bank, the UN Envoy for Syrian Peace Talks, U.S. State Department and others, are developing key metrics measuring trust and inclusion, and convening break-through conferences for scientists, policymakers, practitioners and funders:

§ Neuroscience And Social Conflict: Identifying New Approaches For The 21st Century (2012)

Dehumanization in Conflict (2013)

§ Norms, Narratives, And Neurons (2014)

§ Neuroscience and Peacebuilding: Reframing How We Think About Conflict and Prejudice (2015)

§ New Perspectives On Social Conflict (2015)

§ Building An Inclusive Boston | A New Conversation On Race, Bias & Divided Communities (2016)

Neuroscience is helping us to unpack and better understand how unconscious processes shape the decisions and attitudes of individuals and societies. These research insights are providing essential evidence that is informing both policy and practice and driving the development of effective strategies, tools, and measurement. There are nearly limitless ways that insights from brain science and the behavioral sciences might be applied to our extensive global experience with tremendous impact:

§ Race & Policing Across The U.S.

§ Anti-Semitism & Islamophobia

§ Gender Discrimination & Social Inclusion

§ Mass Migration & Refugees

§ Reducing Gun Violence

§ Negotiations & Building Bridges In Divided Communities

Insights from behavioral science have been successfully applied to other fields such as education and economics, but we have not yet focused on what drives humans into conflict - or toward peace. Leadership is needed now to bridge this gap between science and practice to update our framework for understanding conflict, creating an evidence-based toolkit to address these challenges and accurately measure impact. A growing generation of top-tier scientists and practitioners are eager to devote their careers to the nexus of science and practice - but lack funds, mentorship, pathways for professional growth, and thought communities of colleagues and peers. Institutional funders are slow to change, so there is a dearth of grant support for the groundbreaking scientific research needed to unlock this knowledge - and it will likely be years before funding priorities are realigned to respond. Moreover, there is the risk of general resistance to change across sectors. No matter how compelling the evidence, funding institutions, academia, NGOs and governments at all levels are resistant to change and often suspicious of other perspectives and disciplines that may challenge their own.
 
Global leaders and communities simply do not have the time to wait. As global realities evolve and change, we must prepare ourselves and our communities for the challenges ahead of us. For five years we have strategically applied the strength of our experience and reputation to establish trusted partnerships in this new area. Our detailed strategy envisions phasing infrastructure growth, strengthening our governing board, and adding key scientific advisors and other partners to guide us. We will continue to seek and value the strategic wisdom of others, keeping our integrity and mission at the heart of all we do.