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Artistic Noise Inc.

 P.O. Box 300151
 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
[P] (718) 4968873
[F] --
artisticnoise.org
lia.odonnell@artisticnoise.org
Lia O'Donnell
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INCORPORATED: 2010
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 30-0484749

LAST UPDATED: 01/27/2017
Organization DBA Hear Us Make Artistic Noise
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Artistic Noise exists to bring the freedom and power of artistic practice to young people who are incarcerated, on probation, or otherwise involved in the justice system. Through visual arts and entrepreneurship programs in Massachusetts and New York, our participants give voice to their experiences, build community through collaborative projects, and learn valuable life and job skills. Artistic Noise creates safe spaces where court-involved youth can be seen, heard and supported on their path to adulthood. We believe the practice of making art offers opportunities for young people and communities to transform.

Mission Statement

Artistic Noise exists to bring the freedom and power of artistic practice to young people who are incarcerated, on probation, or otherwise involved in the justice system. Through visual arts and entrepreneurship programs in Massachusetts and New York, our participants give voice to their experiences, build community through collaborative projects, and learn valuable life and job skills. Artistic Noise creates safe spaces where court-involved youth can be seen, heard and supported on their path to adulthood. We believe the practice of making art offers opportunities for young people and communities to transform.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $284,895.00
Projected Expense $339,734.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Studio Art Workshops for Court-Involved Youth

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Artistic Noise exists to bring the freedom and power of artistic practice to young people who are incarcerated, on probation, or otherwise involved in the justice system. Through visual arts and entrepreneurship programs in Massachusetts and New York, our participants give voice to their experiences, build community through collaborative projects, and learn valuable life and job skills. Artistic Noise creates safe spaces where court-involved youth can be seen, heard and supported on their path to adulthood. We believe the practice of making art offers opportunities for young people and communities to transform.


Background Statement

Once a young person is involved in the justice system, he or she often lacks the resources and network to successfully transition back to community living. Most youth in detention are minor delinquents who present a low risk to the community and yet have significant social service needs. Many face daunting challenges such as: Trauma, mental illness, substance abuse, pregnancy, poverty, family chaos, school failure, residential instability and parental incarceration. Most have limited access to opportunities to develop assets and reach success. Siblings, families, groups of friends and communities are also affected by a youth’s involvement in the justice system.

Though young people affected by the justice system have a great deal to say, they have few places to be heard. They have few healthy opportunities to assume responsibility and demonstrate leadership, to experience accomplishment and affirmation, and to develop their creative voice. At Artistic Noise, teens develop a sense of personal pride and community belonging.

Reflective of the statistics for youth involved in the juvenile justice system, 95% of Artistic Noise participants are African American or Latino/a. These boys and girls come from low-income backgrounds and range in age from 13 - 21. In New York, we serve young people from all five boroughs of New York City, Long Island and communities north of the city. In Boston, our participants come from all over Eastern Massachusetts. Since our inception we have been committed to working with small numbers of youth for long periods of time, often several years. With the population we serve, focusing on small groups of participants creates the most positive and lasting impact. In 2015, we reached 192 young people with our high-quality programming, and we are positioned to increase our reach by 15% in 2016.
Artistic Noise was founded in 2001 in Boston as a collaboration between a juvenile defender, an artist and a young incarcerated woman, under the fiscal sponsorship of the Juvenile Rights Advocacy Project (JRAP) at Boston College Law School. In 2008, we expanded to open Artistic Noise New York and became an independent non-profit. Over the years, Artistic Noise has grown to serve hundreds of children and teens affected by the justice system in both Boston and New York every year. The three co-founders still serve in the leadership of Artistic Noise: Francine T. Sherman is a board member and Director of the Juvenile Rights Advocacy Project at Boston College Law School; Lauren Adelman is the New York Executive Director and a practicing artist; and Minotte Romulus is the Boston Assistant Director, a board member, and a former youth participant.

Impact Statement

Major accomplishments in the past year include: 1. Increased number of youth served (doubled number of youth in Boston programs and created robust summer employment program in NY); 2. Significantly grew our organizational capacity by expanding our board, reorganizing board committees, writing a fund development plan, and improving internal communication and management efforts; 3. Mounted a powerful 15 year anniversary exhibition as well as our first-ever fundraising gala.

Goals for the coming year include: 1. Establish financial reserve; 2. restructure programs to adjust to shifts in juvenile justice landscape (restart programs on Rikers Island, launch Art & Entrepreneurship Program in Brooklyn, make art therapy available to all youth, launch workshops in new detention units in Boston, run more community-based programming); 3. implement our new fund development plan; and 4. embark on strategic planning process.

Needs Statement

  1. Establish financial reserve

  2. Diversify funding sources to support current programs

  3. Hire an additional teaching artist to provide quality youth programming in Boston

  4. Launch new website and logo

  5. Secure suitable computers and digital teaching tools for staff

CEO Statement

Currently juvenile justice reform is in the national conversation like never before. For 15 years, Artistic Noise has been working with court-involved youth, helping them to express their voice and forge a positive future for themselves.

We use a whole-person approach, providing youth with a job and a place where he or she is valued as a human being and given the chance and support to grow beyond whatever challenges they face.

We are a community of artists, art therapists, and youth who work together to foster safe, challenging spaces to create art. These spaces offer our youth opportunities to explore their identities, build healthy communities, and feel empowered as artists and leaders.  


Board Chair Statement

Successes

  • Establishing annual retreat so board members in each city have time to collaborate and plan in person

  • Establishing committee with clear duties and leadership

  • Establishing clear process for board recruitment

  • Bringing on board members with new perspectives and more diverse professional and racial backgrounds

  • Embarking on strategic planning process for the first time

  • Enthusiastically adopting a shared fundraising goal as a board

Challenges

  • Growing our base of support beyond former staff’s own networks - addressing it by bringing on new board members

  • Diversifying funding sources beyond grants and government contracts - addressing it by hiring Development Director to establish individual and corporate giving programs

  • Most board members haven’t served on nonprofit boards in the past - addressing it by training


Geographic Area Served

METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

In Boston the majority of our participants come from communities in the Metro DYS region: Revere, Chelsea, Winthrop, and Boston, although youth who are placed in the detention units where we run our art workshops can come from other communities from across Eastern Massachusetts.

NY participants are from the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Manhattan and commnities outside the NY metro area. The program meets at Artistic Noise’s headquarters in Harlem.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts Education
  3. Crime & Legal - Related - Rehabilitation Services for Offenders

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Studio Art Workshops for Court-Involved Youth

Artistic Noise offers studio art workshops in a variety of environments including residential detention facilities, probation offices, and community-based after school settings. Weekly workshops provide court-involved youth with a safe and structured environment to document and process complex feelings and share their stories. In these structured, expectation-driven environments participants see an extensive planning process through to fruition, showing them the importance of working towards long-term goals. Our most dedicated participants can participate in a program that incorporates entrepreneurial and curatorial skills in addition to visual art practice.
Budget  $148,371.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Creative Arts Therapy
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success  75-80% of youth demonstrate:

After 3-12 weeks in programming youth:
-feel sense of support and belonging
-feel safe and challenged to achieve their potential

After 6-15 weeks in programming youth:
-demonstrate willingness and skills to engage in creative/imaginative/innovative thinking and problem solving
-engage in meaningful art making participation

After 10-15 weeks in programming youth:
-demonstrate improved attitude and coping skills
-express increased self-confidence
-demonstrate improved interpersonal skills

After 10-15 weeks in programming youth:
-develop basic artistic skills to express ideas visually
-understand importance of job-related skills: timeliness, responsibility, follow-through
Program Long-Term Success  75-80% of youth demonstrate improvements in the following areas:

Personal Identity Development
-Increased capacity to self-reflect
-Development in character
-Express sense of achievement and pride
-Exhibit competence
-Express more positive view of personal future

Interpersonal Skill Development

-Express more connection to people in their community and others
-Express sense of civic belonging and responsibility

Job Skill Development

-Demonstrate job-related skills: timeliness, responsibility and follow-through which can transfer to future employment
-Exhibit motivation to further their careers
Program Success Monitored By  At Artistic Noise, we work on a deep level over extended time periods with small groups of youth. Currently we collect outcome data in two ways: with a post-program survey adapted from that of a funder of our NYC branch (Variety), and by holding bi-monthly performance reviews for our youth in programs. Still, these efforts do not give us sufficient data to evaluate the total impact of our programs and are currently creating a more tailored evaluation system based on our logic model. Our new system will more closely track our indicators and allow for better outcomes analysis.
Examples of Program Success  "Artistic Noise gave me a voice I never had. When I turned 18 DYS (Department of Youth Services) kicked me out with no knowledge of the real world and Artistic Noise took me in. I think to myself where would I be without Artistic Noise, maybe dead or in jail. If I never got the chance to join, learn and grow I would be going back to a place I never wanted to be. But now when I go back as a mentor to teach, it feels good for the girls to know I was there and I turned my life around and they can do the same with their lives."
-Minotte Romulus, co-founder, former participant, and Assistant Director of Artistic Noise Boston

“Artistic Noise...taught me how to express myself in a non-violent way. Artistic Noise gave me an outlet in which I was able to express myself freely. Artistic Noise is my home away from home, we are a family unit. This ‘family unit’ has watched me grow from a wild teenager into a respectable young woman. My ‘family’ has given me tools that have made me stronger and wiser. In a nutshell Artistic Noise showed me an inner strength I was not aware of, then it gave me a space in which I could test it out and build it.”
-Ebony, Office & Exhibit Manager, former participant and youth curator 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Artistic Noise is an art and entrepreneurship program providing court involved youth  opportunities to use visual art to express themselves, document their lives, give a positive, public voice to their experiences, and develop personal and professional skills for success in life.
Artistic Noise Boston serves court-involved youth, through three initiatives: 

●      Art Therapy Workshops: In NYC, Artistic Noise provides art therapy workshops for youth who are on probation, offering support in working towards a deeper level of self-awareness. In Boston, graduate level interns integrate art therapy into all of our programming

●      Art and Entrepreneurship Programs in Community Settings: In this intensive afterschool program, participants develop their creative skills as individuals and collaborators as well as their business skills as paid artists, entrepreneurs and curators. Once hired, youth earn an hourly wage as they work with their peers to create, market and sell original artwork and curate an annual art exhibit in a gallery.

 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Vanessa Ruiz
CEO Term Start Jan 2015
CEO Email vanessa.ruiz@artisticnoise.org
CEO Experience Vanessa, better known as Nessie Ruiz, is an artist and educator originally from Miami, FL. She received a BFA in Photography from the Rhode Island School of Design and a MFA in Visual Arts from the University of Chicago. Vanessa's photographic work revolves around social issues affecting marginalized groups of children, both locally and abroad. Since 1999, she has been passionately involved with children-focused non-profits in the US, Sri Lanka, and South Africa where she has created and implemented art, empowerment and leadership programs for kids and teens. She has been a college photography instructor since 2010 and a die hard Dolly Parton fan since she was eleven. She believes wholeheartedly that art has the power to transform lives and has dedicated her own life to bringing that art to underprivileged youth. www.vanessaruiz.com
Co-CEO Ms. Lauren Adelman
Co-CEO Term Start Jan 2001
Co-CEO Email lauren.adelman@artisticnoise.org
Co-CEO Experience Lauren Adelman is an artist and educator based in NY. She received a BFA from The School of The Museum of Fine Arts and a MA in Arts Education from NYU. She co-founded Artistic Noise in Boston in 2001 and New York in 2008. Lauren also worked as an educator at the Museum of Modern Art 2006-2013. Most recently she worked in the Community and Access Department at MoMA running partnerships with adults and youth involved in the criminal justice system. Lauren is a licensed Department of Education Teacher and has taught art in many varied settings such as public schools, juvenile detention centers, and non-profit arts organizations both locally and abroad. Lauren has shown her own artwork nationally and has been awarded residencies at The Wassaic Project, Wassaic, NY; Anchor Graphics, Chicago, IL and was most recently a visiting artist at The Artist's Proof Studio in Johannesburg, South Africa. Lauren's own artistic practice explores environmental and social issues through printmaking, drawing, animation and other media. www.laurenadelman.com

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Violence Transformed

DYS Showcase

Ubuntu Exhibition at Wheelock College

MoMA

NYC Summer Youth Employment Program

Center for Alternative to Sentencing and Employment Services

NYC Dept of Probation

New York University

Offices of Children and Family Services

NYC Mayor's MAP Initiative

St. Nicholas Housing Development

Harlem Children's Zone

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 12
Number of Volunteers 3
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 10
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Kate Jellinghaus
Board Chair Company Affiliation Westwood High School
Board Chair Term July 2015 - June 2018
Board Co-Chair Ms. Tess Korobkin
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Whitney Museum of American Art
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Yasmine Awais Drexel University Voting
Mr. Joel Diaz Scholastic Inc. Voting
Ms. Kimberly Gordan Boston District of US Attorney's Office Voting
Ms. Amanda Holm The Boston Foundation Voting
Ms. Kate Jellinghaus Westwood High School Voting
Ms. Tess Korobkin Whitney Museum of American Art Voting
Ms. Francine Sherman Boston College Law School Voting
Ms. Irene Sherman The Ezra Keats Foundation Voting
Ms. Ann Tobey Wheelock College Voting
Mr. Maurice Vann Researcher and author Voting
Mr. Alex Venino Century Equity Partners Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Afro-Latino/Black
Gender Female: 8
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 40%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Executive
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Artistic Noise's Board comprises 11 active members: 6 members who have served for three years or more, and 5 new members. Our longer-serving members have expertise in a range of areas -- including law, education, social work and art therapy / education. These members also have strong accumulated institutional memory and experience, given that some are program founders and former teachers. This is important in that our current board has a deep understanding of how our programs work in practice. Our newer members bring deeper financial and non-profit management expertise to our board as well as knowledge about program evaluation, an area we have prioritized for improvement. Looking forward, in FY 17-18, we are looking to grow our board by another 4 members, to reach 15 active members, as well as to start a Board Emeritus (constituent Board) and a Advisory Board. We currently do not have such boards structures in place and this will be a part of our FY 17-18 strategy to widen our circle of supporters.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $284,895.00
Projected Expense $339,734.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $194,402 $149,599 $124,723
Total Expenses $205,707 $156,033 $132,359

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$130,677 $113,021 $104,475
Government Contributions $22,600 $17,707 $10,000
    Federal -- -- --
    State $22,600 $17,707 $10,000
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $35,293 $16,795 $7,000
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $5,832 $2,076 $3,248
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $205,707 $156,033 $132,359
Administration Expense -- -- --
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.95 0.96 0.94
Program Expense/Total Expenses 100% 100% 100%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $31,132 $42,876 $51,221
Current Assets $31,132 $42,876 $51,221
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $439 $2,350
Total Net Assets $31,132 $42,437 $48,871

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- 97.67 21.80

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

For over 15 years, Artistic Noise has used art and entrepreneurship to serve youth who have been affected by the juvenile justice system in Boston and New York City. Artistic Noise programming spans studio art workshops, art therapy sessions and entrepreneurship opportunities to provide youth with community connections and continuity, impart leadership skills and give them a voice to express themselves. Artistic Noise is a focused, grassroots organization whose mission is carried out by a passionate and dedicated staff.
 
Artistic Noise has historically been funded largely by government foundation grants, and the donations from a small network of loyal supporters. As the organization has grown and expanded programming
efforts, the leadership and the Board recognize the importance of establishing a solid financial reserve, diversifying funding sources and increasing its network of individual donors to support sustainable growth. To accomplish this, the organization hired a business development professional, significantly expanded the Board and drafted a strategic development plan. Key tenets of the development plan include building on working relationships with foundation donor partners, applying for new attractive, unrestricted grants and leveraging resources to support fundraising efforts.
 
As Artistic Noise enters this new phase of growth, the organization will continue to prioritize growing programming in a fiscally responsible way, while addressing our deficit through increased fundraising and marketing efforts.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s with revenue breakdown per the nonprofit.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Artistic Noise is an arts and entrepreneurship program that exists to bring the freedom and power of artistic practice to young people who are incarcerated, on probation, or otherwise involved in the justice system. Most youth in detention are minor delinquents who present a low risk to the community and yet have significant social service needs. Many face daunting challenges such as: Trauma, mental illness, substance abuse, pregnancy, poverty, family chaos, school failure, residential instability and parental incarceration. Most have limited access to opportunities to develop assets and reach success. Participants are exposed to typical risk factors for teens (peer pressure, stress, sexual health) and the stresses of living in economically depressed urban areas (e.g., violence, dysfunctional schools, financial hardship). By definition, all of our participants have been placed at risk through experiences of incarceration and involvement with the legal system.

Artistic Noise aims to accomplish the following:

Safe, Supportive and Challenging Space

  • Youth feel sense of support belonging and value (e.g., youth report feeling respected, encouraged, supported, valued…)

  • Youth experience climate of safety, challenge and fun (e.g., youth report feeling challenged, program time feels positive, feels like a good use of their time, had fun, felt excited…)

Artistic and Creative Skill Development

  • Youth demonstrate willingness to engage in creative/imaginative/innovative thinking and problem solving (e.g., offer new solutions or attempt self-generated approaches measured via teacher observation, progress reports…)

  • Increasing proficiency in artistic skills (increased quality of craft and product)

Personal Identity Development

  • Youth demonstrate improved attitude and coping (measure: engagement, focus, demeanor, interpersonal relations)

  • Youth engage in meaningful participation (teacher observation, progress report, self-report)

  • Increased capacity to self-reflect (receive feedback, demonstrate insight, take responsibility via journals, teacher observation)

  • Youth demonstrate development in character (respect for others, respect for rules)

  • Youth express sense of achievement and pride

  • Youth exhibit and express sense of competence (increased persistence, self-efficacy)

  • Youth express increased confidence (willingness to explore and take on leadership roles/responsibilities)

  • More positive view of personal future

Interpersonal Skill Development

  • Youth demonstrate improved interpersonal skills (friendship, empathy, cultural sensitivity, networking, verbal communication, conflict resolution)

  • Youth report positive bonds with staff and peers

  • Youth feel more connection to community and others outside their community

  • Youth express sense of civic belonging and civic responsibility

  • Youth demonstrate civic action by contributing, volunteering or serving others

Job Skill Development

  • Youth demonstrate improvement in job-related skills (e.g., punctuality, capacity to take constructive feedback, attitude, boundaries…)

  • Youth exhibit motivation to further their careers and achieve (e.g., school performance, future thinking…Feel ready for work, ready for life, ready for school/college)

Viewer Impact

  • Viewers report changed/improved perceptions of incarcerated youth

  • Viewers feel more connection to youth

  • Viewers report increased understanding of and empathy for system-involved youth and the issues they face

Community Benefit

  • Break down stereotypes of youth, youth engaged as positive civic participants


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

  • Create safe, supportive and challenging spaces for youth

  • Develop the artistic and creative skills of youth participants

  • Develop the personal identity and sense of agency and leadership of youth participants

  • Develop interpersonal, job and life skills of youth participants

  • Impact greater audiences through art exhibits, youth curations, public events and documentation

  • Benefit the broader community by breaking down stereotypes of youth and helping youth develop as positive civic participants

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

  • Weekly art studio workshops with incarcerated youth

  • Regular (2-3 times/week or 5 times/week in summer) art and entrepreneurship workshops for community-based youth

  • Facilitated group activities (e.g., team building, artmaking)

  • Field trips for community-based youth

  • Exposure to artistic inspiration and technique

  • Hands-on artmaking in a wide variety of media (e.g., sculpture, painting, photography, filmmaking)

  • Hands-on technology based design activities (e.g. website, logo design)

  • Short-term individual artmaking projects

  • Long-term collaborative artmaking projects

  • Didactic and project based concept development, design, implementation and exhibition

  • Personal development curriculum

  • Job readiness skill development

  • Media, marketing and sales skills workshops

  • Entrepreneurship experiences via sale of art products

  • Leadership experience through leading community based projects, as well as monthly workshops for young children
  • Networking and collaborating with youth groups, community members and professionals

  • Documenting experiences and processes (e.g., Journaling)

  • Collaborative development of curriculum

  • Participatory evaluation of youth and program

  • Evaluating responses of viewers


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Theory of Change:

If….Artistic Noise provides opportunities that promote positive developmental outcomes in multiple domains of personhood (e.g., social, cognitive, emotional) by offering programming that helps youth achieve their potential….

Then….Our teen participants will develop skills and competencies that are building blocks for achievement outcomes and positive developmental outcomes.

If…. Artistic Noise Programming includes: Strong opportunities, experiences and resources that are characterized by: Creativity and artistry; supportive structure; climate of safety, challenge and fun; enriching opportunities and experiences that support positive developmental outcomes for youth participants

Then…Our teen participants will be more likely to reach adulthood with the skills, competencies and resources that they need to be happy, healthy, creative and productive adults.

Concrete Outputs:

  • 100 youth served in lock up per year

  • 10 youth served in community per year

  • Completed artwork

  • Artwork exhibited and shared with viewers

  • Planning and implementing curated exhibits

  • Celebration event/reception

  • Artifacts of Documentation (e.g, written, photo, video)

  • Written and recorded artist statements

  • Process and assessment materials

  • Youth portfolios and resumes

  • Youth earn stipend income

  • Website and marketing tools


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

What we have accomplished so far:

  • Funding from grants

  • Experienced staff

  • Consistency

  • High quality visiting artists, curators and collaborators

  • Mentoring relationships

  • College facilities

  • Quality art instruction

  • Quality art materials

  • Creative concept driven curriculum

  • Enriching and innovative challenges and experiences

  • Inclusive group cohesion

  • Transition support from lock-up to community

  • Strong supervision

  • Programming for increasing levels of responsibility and participation

  • Change based on feedback and assessment

  • Attention and value to process and product

  • Youth – time, effort, creativity

What we haven’t accomplished so far:

  • More expansive individual donor base

  • A more formal program evaluation system

  • Long-term organizational strategic plan

  • Sustainable growth

  • Financial reserve

  • We would like to serve more youth and expand the scope of our reach.