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Gilbert Albert Community Center

 155 Washington Street
 Dorchester, MA 02121
[P] (857) 492-6063 x 000
[F] (617) 265-1713
www.GACCINC.org
[email protected]
Nicole Albert
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INCORPORATED: 2005
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 30-0430263

LAST UPDATED: 09/21/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names Gilbert Albert Foundation, inc (2005)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Since the Gilbert Albert Community Center (GACC) was established in 2005, our mission has been to educate immigrant populations in the Greater Boston area with the knowledge that education will promote a healthy, vibrant, and flourishing community . The Gilbert Albert Community Center is aware of the sociolinguistic barriers that affect local immigrant populations and threaten to damage individual and communal relationships, as well as cross-cultural development, and seeks to overcome these barriers through ESL courses, access to social services, and programming that promotes healthy lifestyles.  The Gilbert Albert Community Center supports local immigrant communities by providing services that will increase cultural awareness and facilitate acculturation and integration.

Mission Statement

Since the Gilbert Albert Community Center (GACC) was established in 2005, our mission has been to educate immigrant populations in the Greater Boston area with the knowledge that education will promote a healthy, vibrant, and flourishing community . The Gilbert Albert Community Center is aware of the sociolinguistic barriers that affect local immigrant populations and threaten to damage individual and communal relationships, as well as cross-cultural development, and seeks to overcome these barriers through ESL courses, access to social services, and programming that promotes healthy lifestyles.  The Gilbert Albert Community Center supports local immigrant communities by providing services that will increase cultural awareness and facilitate acculturation and integration.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Sept 01, 2016 to Aug 31, 2017
Projected Income $100,010.00
Projected Expense $69,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Career Preparation and Counseling
  • ESOL
  • Health and Wellness Programming

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Since the Gilbert Albert Community Center (GACC) was established in 2005, our mission has been to educate immigrant populations in the Greater Boston area with the knowledge that education will promote a healthy, vibrant, and flourishing community . The Gilbert Albert Community Center is aware of the sociolinguistic barriers that affect local immigrant populations and threaten to damage individual and communal relationships, as well as cross-cultural development, and seeks to overcome these barriers through ESL courses, access to social services, and programming that promotes healthy lifestyles.  The Gilbert Albert Community Center supports local immigrant communities by providing services that will increase cultural awareness and facilitate acculturation and integration.

Background Statement

Gilbert Albert Community Center is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization formed in 2005 to serve adults from low-income Haitian immigrant families by providing high-quality English language instruction and providing a robust support system for foreign-born Haitians. In 2007, the GACC established the English Language Network (ELN) in South Dorchester to provide accessible and effective English language instruction for Haitian migrants, all of whom speak Haitian Creole as their first language. Over the past five years, GACC has expanded its scope and now serves the growing and diverse immigrant communities in Dorchester, Mattapan and Hyde Park.
 
GACC acknowledges that the large immigrant populations in these communities seek ESL and skills training programs in order to enter the workforce and become financially independent. By working closely with these immigrants, the GACC has recognized that the student body is in great need of not just workplace and survival English, but also basic literacy skills; literacy skills are imperative for successful language acquisition and acculturation.
 
In 2011-12, GACC partnered with the Boston Public Health Committee's (BPHC) Obesity Prevention Initiative to promote awareness of the negative impact of sugary drinks on health in the Haitian community. GACC partnered with BPHC again from 2013-2015 to run original programming to address hypertension and obesity within the populations we serve. To this end, GACC developed strong relationships with Boston Natural Areas Network, Healthworks Fitness for Women, Healthy in the Hood, Dorchester Arts Collaborative, Four Corners Main Streets and Millennium 10 to create unique health and fitness opportunities for our clients.
 
GACC has also worked with Matahiri, an international organization working on preventing domestic violence, and is currently partnered with Project Hope, a local women's shelter and domestic violence prevention program. GACC is also partners with MA Rising Tides on promoting HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention.

Impact Statement

In the past year, GACC has successfully made several important expansions to its program:
  • Partnered with Emerson College and Liberty Mutual volunteers to run mock job interviews and resume workshops with our clients
  • Received a grant from the City of Boston to run anti-fraud workshops within the Haitian community
  • Partnered with the Boston Public Health Commission on the REACH grant, aimed at decreasing obesity and hypertension in minority communities
  • Partnered with Share Our Strength to do healthy shopping tours of Stop and Shop
  • Ran evening ESL classes for more advanced students seeking job hunting and workplace skills
  • Partnered with Emerson College to bring in volunteer classroom aides for our ESL courses
  • Helped over a dozen women sign up for subsidized gym memberships
  • Implemented an innovative form literacy curriculum
  • Ramped up our presence on social media
For the upcoming year GACC strives to:
  • Run citizenship classes on-site
  • Continue developing a workforce development curriculum to prepare clients to enter the workforce in jobs that pay a living wage
  • Run regular programming in conjunction with immigrant churches offering exercise and nutrition education and increasing awareness of area green spaces and health resources
  • Increase fundraising and grant writing efforts
  • Partner with immigrant churches to educate communities on how to prevent and break out of cycles of violence, especially domestic violence
  • Procure child care for ESL classes to allow more caretakers to attend class
  • Continue to use social media to increase family participation and student enrollment

Needs Statement

GACC is a small, grassroots immigrant organization that has been operating very effective ESL classes and healthy living programming on a shoestring budget with very generous donations of volunteers and other community organizations. To support this work, the most pressing needs are:
  • Maintain financial stability by increasing reserve capital (an ideal goal of $75,000 over next five years)
  • Procure funds to run regular programming for months between academic years (June-September)
  • Develop a sustainable fundraising platform and business plan
  • Recruit volunteers to help as classroom aides, child care providers, and/or fundraisers
  • Implement new programming to address prevention of domestic violence in our community and to help victims of domestic violence break the cycle

CEO Statement

The strength of GACC is its active and holistic involvement in students' lives. Teachers and students are on equal footing in classrooms-- some students are pastors and lead teachers in Sunday service. Both teachers and students participate as active members of families, the community, and faith-based organizations. GACC has also identified a literacy crisis- how many Haitian students are non-readers and writers—a sensitive issue that students may not openly acknowledge.  Our basic literacy course has been an enormous success, and our classes are so effective that we now have long waiting lists of students. Our counselor and our staff are equipped to handle all of the factors that might hinder a student's ability to learn in the classroom, including issues relating to employment, housing, acculturation, and family, and our programming educates and engages students in building healthier lifestyles for themselves and their children.


Board Chair Statement

I began working with the Gilbert Albert Community Center as an English teacher in 2009. During this time, I developed close interpersonal bonds with many of my students, who were struggling with issues related to health, unemployment, personal advocacy, poverty, and family unity, largely due to a lack of linguistic and cultural understanding. I became further involved with the Haitian community after the devastating earthquake in January 2010. On top of the normal acculturation and acclimation issues faced by immigrants, the Haitian community was also coping with the calamity that occurred in January. For a community that was already largely living in the shadows, there was a great need for a unifying voice and support system to strengthen family bonds, provide language and health services, and put hope back people's hearts. Otherwise, this community would never flourish as happy, healthy, and active members of society in the U.S. Since the greater Boston area has one of the largest Haitian communities in the U.S, establishing this voice here is imperative and essential. GACC has worked tirelessly with community organizations, churches, and families to promote education and empowerment. Very few organizations serving the Haitian, Latino and African populations exist with our reputation, commitment, and dedication, which is a testament to the hard work put forth by our staff and our members. Unfortunately, as our community reach is growing, our ability to provide educational services is shrinking. We need financial support to continue to provide the services that empower the local immigrant populations and the greater Boston community at large. I would like to thank you from the bottom of my heart for your consideration and support.  A donation, no matter how small, brings positive change and helps us to fulfill our mission.

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

GACC serves the growing Greater Boston immigrant community, primarily within Dorchester, Roxbury, Mattapan, Hyde Park and Roslindale.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Adult Education
  2. Human Services - Ethnic/Immigrant Services
  3. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Women's Rights

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Career Preparation and Counseling

Now running a weekly computer course on-site, GACC is committed to providing education that give our students the skills they need to secure a job in today's marketplace. We also offer individual and career counseling services to the students, to address the specific issues that are affecting their opportunities to secure work. All our services are free.
Budget  $10,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Adults Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of this program calendar year (May 2014), 75% of students will be computer literate (as defined above) and 25% seeking career guidance from our counselor will have secured employment.
Program Long-Term Success  For people who complete our computer classes, we would like 100% of them to be computer literate, that is: able to access and use the Internet; able to set up and use their own email account; able to use word processing programs.
Of the students who use our career counseling services, we would like 80% of them to secure employment.
Program Success Monitored By  We will know how many people gain computer literacy skills by doing individual observation and assessment at the end of the program calendar year. Assessment of students who have secured employment will be conducted through interviews with our career counselor.
Examples of Program Success  Many students seeking to gain employable skills through GACC have since found careers in the community, some within the first few months of attending courses and consulting with our career counselor.

ESOL

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) for adult immigrants who speak Haitian Creole, Spanish, Cape Verdean Creole, and other languages.  We offer three levels of English classes including basic literacy.
Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Adults Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Latin America & the Caribbean
Program Short-Term Success 
A majority of the students have graduated to the next level of classes.
A number of students have secured jobs.
Program Long-Term Success  Acquiring English language proficiency with enable Haitian immigrants to dramatically improve their employment opportunities, assist their children in school, and become active participating members in their new adopted communities.
Program Success Monitored By  All students are tested at the beginning and end of each school year utilizing the BEST PLUS test to quantify their progress.   This test was developed by the Center for Applied Linguistics to test oral English proficiency for Adults.
Examples of Program Success  Since the program began in 2007 we have helped over 250 Haitian immigrants and their families.

Health and Wellness Programming

We offer health and wellness workshops that include nutrition education, exercise courses, education on the prevention of HIV/AIDS and other STIs, and education on improving environmental health. We also provide the basic tools needed to implement healthy lifestyle changes, such as water bottles and information on local nutrition and exercise resources.
Budget  $25,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Preventive Health
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Adults Families
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of our current cycle of programming (through Summer 2015), all participants will have been given the opportunity and resources to acquire or switch their health care plan to one that works for them. In addition, 75% of students will increase their intake of unprocessed vegetables and fruits, decrease their intake of artificially sweetened beverages and foods, and exercise on a regular basis. Instances of screening for STIs and uses of safe sexual practices will also increase.
Program Long-Term Success  The rates of people in Dorchester living with obesity, diabetes, asthma, and STIs will be the same or less as the rates of people living with those health issues in the entirety of Boston. The percentage of our student population living with any of these afflictions will be less than 10%.
Program Success Monitored By  We will track the success of these initiatives by measuring the reach of our workshops, which includes the participants as well as their family members who will also benefit from things like an increase in fresh produce in the household and more family excursions to green spaces for recreation. Amongst these populations, we will measure healthy changes in their lifestyles by self-reported surveys, as well as counselor interviews on things like diet, health insurance and issues caused by obesity/malnutrition in their families.
Examples of Program Success  This past year, GACC worked on a program through the Boston Public Health Commission to reduce the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages in the immigrant community in Dorchester. The program was so successful that GACC was awarded a certificate of excellence from the BPHC.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We are fortunate to have staff at the GACC who make tremendous efforts and volunteer their time and assets to support the programs and to keep them afloat. To sustain these efforts and expand our services, we are in deep need of a grant writer and fundraising support to keep up the good work. We are also in great need of reserve capital that will allow us to be financially stable through the next five years within our current space.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Nicole L Albert
CEO Term Start Nov 2005
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Mrs. Albert was the director of the College Gilbert Albert in Port au Prince, Haiti for twenty years from 1984-2004.  College Gilbert Albert is a private educational institution serving over a thousand primary and secondary students at two campuses in Port au Prince.  As the director she was responsible for all the administrative and operational aspects of the school.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Claude Henry Albert Senior Staff Principal
Mr. Claude has twenty-five years working in for-profit management as Drector.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Certificate of Recognition Boston Public Health Commission 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

We have partnerships with the following organizations:
-English for New Bostonians, which supports our ESOL programs. 
-The Dorchester Adult Literacy Coalition, a network of 21+ agencies that provide integrated services to adults living in Dorchester.
-First Literacy, which has provided financial support and continues to provide professional development  
-Boston Public Health Commission, through whom we run targeted health and wellness programs.
-Matahari and Project Hope, both organizations comprised of immigrant women and women of color that fight to end gender-based violence and exploitation.
-MA Rising Tides, which works to educate on and prevent transmission of HIV/AIDS.
-Local health and community wellness organizations, including Boston Natural Areas Network, Dorchester Community Food Co-op, Healthworks, and the YMCA.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

GACC received a Vision Fund Grant from the Boston Foundation this past spring to help develop the organizational structure and fundraising plan.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 6
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Ashley Valentini
Board Chair Company Affiliation Boston Center for Adult Education
Board Chair Term July 2010 - July 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Jean Senat Fleury Art for Change Voting
Mr. Claude Henry Beca Engineering Voting
Mr. Marc E. Lafalaise Helping Hand Mission Organization Voting
Mr. Delima Pierre FHAREF (Fondation Haitienne pour la Recherche et la Formation) Voting
Ms. Dina Shackleton Color Blind Women Voting
Ms. Crista Smith Org. Dev. Community Voting
Mr. Gladimir St. Pierre Volunteer Voting
Mr. Russell Theodate Theodate Insurance Agency Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 3
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 5
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 17%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Sept 01, 2016 to Aug 31, 2017
Projected Income $100,010.00
Projected Expense $69,000.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $80,669 $117,578 $86,320
Total Expenses $74,499 $115,985 $86,161

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $83,218 $117,293 $86,320
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- $285 --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $-2,562 -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $13 -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $74,499 $90,414 $86,161
Administration Expense -- $25,571 --
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.08 1.01 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 100% 78% 100%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $8,189 $2,019 $426
Current Assets $6,289 $119 $426
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- $0
Current Liabilities $0 -- $0
Total Net Assets $8,189 $2,019 $426

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We are currently working on a capital campaign to ensure continuous coverage of operational costs in our new autonomous space, where we are running more programs to benefit members of our community than ever before. Our main funder does not cover operational costs. This is one of the reasons we are permanently struggling.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s, with additional expense breakout detail for per the Form PC on file with the state of MA.  

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

In the next three years, the Gilbert Albert Community Center seeks to widen the breadth and deepen the impact of its programs to more comprehensively serve members of the local immigrant communities. This includes:
-Providing more ESL classes to eliminate its current waiting list and ensure that all students seeking an education through the GACC are accepted. Before this can happen, we will continue to strengthen our referral network, to ensure we are helping students to find the resources they need to advance educationally, professionally and socially.
-Providing higher level ESL classes for the students who graduate from our classes and seek to continue advancing their English education
-Providing job skills training, including practice in job hunting, building resumes, computer skills training, and information on workers' rights and workplace etiquette
-Running educational programs that address health issues affecting the local immigrant communities, including nutrition, exercise, HIV/AIDS prevention, domestic violence and relationships, and other issues as they are identified by our students and staff.
-Institutionalizing programs and partnerships with community organizations to establish access to resources and social services for our students.
 
We will measure the success of these goals based on a.) the number of classes and levels we are able to offer, b.) the number of students we can accommodate, c.) the progress shown by students in our classes using standardized assessment tools, d.) the number of community members serviced by our programs, e.) our ability to reliably provide access or referrals to social services.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

The GACC seeks to accomplish these long-term goals through a three-tiered strategy, which addresses:
1. A holistic approach to students' needs, with the understanding that a student who is living a healthy lifestyle outside of class is a more productive learner.
2.Institutional stability, including acquiring and retaining effective staff members and being financially stable.
3. Establishing relationships with community partners, including local churches, health centers, and other non-profits, to expand the reach of our programs and to ensure reliable access for our constituents to necessary services.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

The GACC's proven record of providing effective ESL and literacy courses has brought it acclaim from English for New Bostonians, who has asked our leadership to act as representatives of an exemplary ESL program for other emerging programs to follow. One of our students was even asked to speak at Immigrants' Day at the Massachusetts State House in 2016.
 
Our ESL and employment support services consistently perform higher than other programs of similar size in Boston. In FY 2015, our students had a 9% higher rate of significant learning gains, a 8% higher rate of moving on to higher education, a 9% higher rate of finding a job, and a 12% higher rate of being promoted or finding a better job. Fully 74% of our unemployed students found jobs while studying with the GACC that year.
 
For our initiatives in the community to reduce the intake of sugar and sodium and increase healthy eating and exercise, the GACC has been awarded recognition for outstanding work by the Boston Public Health Commission.
 
The GACC has been working within the local immigrant populations and with churches, health centers and social service providers since 2005, establishing a reputation for quality classes and programming that addresses the pressing needs of our community, and as such has gained the trust and confidence of the populations we serve.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

While understanding that any single measurement of our students' progress cannot account for the myriad of personal, professional, and academic goals they have, the GACC uses the following metrics:
 
--The number of students who register for ESOL classes (including those who enroll and those put on the waiting list). In the past three years, we've seen a 56.25% increase in the number of students, and for the third time this year we have a waiting list.
--Of the students who attend classes here, the number who then: gain employment; graduate to a higher level course; and obtain their academic goals as outlined with the counselor.
In the 2014-2015 academic year, 75% of unemployed students found employment, and 28% got a better job or a promotion. Nearly all of the students in the basic literacy class can now sign their names, a huge accomplishment for people who had never written a letter in their lives!
--The number of points improved on the BESTPlus tests at the end of a year of ESOL classes. 42% of our students in 2014-15 had an increase of 33 points or more.
--The number of students who make a commitment to making healthier lifestyle decisions, such as drinking less sugar-sweetened beverages or participating in more cardiovascular activity each week. In 2014-2015, we assisted a dozen women in signing up for subsidized gym memberships and attending regular fitness classes. The GACC was also awarded a certificate by the Boston Public Health Commission in 2013 for its achievements in getting members of the local immigrant community to drink less sugar-sweetened beverages.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

The GACC hopes to achieve the following goals within the next year:
--Maintain financial stability in our new space
--Expand our classes to serve 100 students
--Reduce the rates of obesity, diabetes, and STDs within our community
--Reduce the rate of domestic violence within our community 
 
Towards these ends, the GACC continues to build on its successes of the past few years, which are:
--In the past three years, we've seen a 56.25% increase in the number of students, and for the second time this year we have a waiting list.
--In the 2014-2015 academic year, 74% of unemployed students found employment, and 28% got a better job or a promotion. Nearly all of the students in the basic literacy class can now sign their names, a huge accomplishment for people who had never written a letter in their lives!
--42% of our students in 2014-15 had an increase of 33 points or more on the BESTPlus test after a year of being in our ESOL classes.
--In 2014-2015, we assisted a dozen women in signing up for subsidized gym memberships and attending regular fitness classes. 
--The GACC was awarded a certificate by the Boston Public Health Commission in 2013 for its achievements in getting members of the local immigrant community to drink less sugar-sweetened beverages.
 
We have incorporated a strategic, comprehensive approach to addressing our members' needs after realizing that their personal needs often affect their performance in class and in the workplace. We first survey our members, asking them what their goals and challenges are as a group and then in individual meetings with our counselor. We then use that information to construct programming, such as our monthly women's support group.