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Louis D. Brown Peace Institute

 1452 Dorchester Avenue, Suite 2, c/o Clementina M Chery
 Dorchester, MA 02122
[P] (617) 825-1917
[F] (617) 265-2278
www.ldbpeaceinstitute.org
[email protected]
George Riley
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INCORPORATED: 2009
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 26-3068254

LAST UPDATED: 07/09/2015
Organization DBA The Peace Institute
LDBPI
LDB Peace Institute
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Peace Institute's mission is to create and promote an environment of peace and unity, where young people and their families are valued for their peacemaking efforts. The foundation of our mission rests on the use of the 7 principles of peace (love, unity, faith, hope, courage, justice, forgiveness) through direct service programs, trainings and public policy advocacy.

Mission Statement

The Peace Institute's mission is to create and promote an environment of peace and unity, where young people and their families are valued for their peacemaking efforts. The foundation of our mission rests on the use of the 7 principles of peace (love, unity, faith, hope, courage, justice, forgiveness) through direct service programs, trainings and public policy advocacy.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $518,000.00
Projected Expense $520,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Implementation of PeaceZone Curriculum in Schools
  • Policy Work
  • Survivors Outreach Services

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Peace Institute's mission is to create and promote an environment of peace and unity, where young people and their families are valued for their peacemaking efforts. The foundation of our mission rests on the use of the 7 principles of peace (love, unity, faith, hope, courage, justice, forgiveness) through direct service programs, trainings and public policy advocacy.

Background Statement

Since 1994, the LDBPI has worked on the front lines providing social/emotional support, information, and assistance to individuals and families surviving the murder of a loved one. The Peace Institute was founded by the parents of 15-year-old Louis D. Brown, who was killed in the crossfire of a gang shooting as he walked to a Teens Against Gang Violence Christmas party in 1993.

The small community-based organization, led and staffed by individuals personally affected by violence, is often the “first response” to contact the shocked and grieving surviving family members of homicide in the Boston area. Survivors of violence are referred by hospitals, schools, local police, district attorney’s office, clergy and other community-based organizations to provide direct support to inspire peace within the affected community.

Clementina Chery, CEO and President, saw a gap in the service delivery system for survivors. She decided to forge a new path to healing and reconciliation through the creation of innovative programs that teach and apply the core seven principles of peace: love, unity, faith, hope, courage, justice, forgiveness. 

 


Impact Statement

In collaboration with UMass Boston Graduate School of
Applied Sociology and UMass Medical Center, the Peace Institute has developed an initial orientation training to introduce the Step-by-Step Burial and Resource Guide to providers across the state of MA serving survivors of homicide victims to standard response to families impacted by violence. Following the initial training, providers will be offered an opportunity to be trained in administering the Step-by-Step Burial & Resource Guide, which will also provide continuing education credits.  
 
It is the hope that this training will enhance the work of front-line
providers while also providing them with vital knowledge and skills to better serve survivors of homicide victims using a proven and trusted model developed by the LDBPI.
 
Current year:

Through the development of short, mid and long term outcomes
we will create clarity of direction; and a solid infrastructure for
prospecting, requesting, completing, and maintaining grant and donor relationships; greater comfort talking about money; and greater comfort in creating and understanding budgets. This will help our organization to address the need for staffing in each department as we expand our model's reach to a larger number of families and youth to create and support peace more widely in the inner-city communities of Boston.



 

 

Needs Statement

We are working to bring our work to scale and to develop
a financially healthy organization with stable governance that can meet the needs of the community.

An experienced board with fiscal knowledge and the ability to raise funds

   
Staff develops a deeper understanding of fund development and fiscal knowledge

Creating a blueprint for how to effectively expand our programs key to our communities


 

CEO Statement

Although other organizations also work to break the trend of
violence, our work is differentiated in significant ways:

1.      We are survivors; both victims and perpetrators our organization is grassroots survivor led community-based.

2.     Our model uses holistic and community trauma response methods to help survivors cope with loss, healing and grief. A community of survivors helps other survivors.

3.     We have developed a system-wide violence response approach that embodies all three levels of violence prevention, primary, secondary, and tertiary, as defined by the U.S. Department of Health.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Greater Boston Area, mainly inner city Boston

Organization Categories

  1. Crime & Legal - Related - Youth Violence Prevention
  2. Education - Elementary & Secondary Schools
  3. Human Services - Family Violence Shelters and Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Implementation of PeaceZone Curriculum in Schools

PeaceZone is an elementary school-based program designed to increase students' ability to make positive decisions avoid risk-taking behavior and heal from trauma and loss. PeaceZone was developed by the Harvard School of Public Health, Lesson Company, the Louis D. Brown Peace Institute, and the Boston Public Schools.  Early prevention has been shown to increase children's resilience, reinforce positive behaviors, and promote social benefits.  To be truly preventative, programs should begin no later than first grade. 
Budget  $5000/school
Category  Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success  A recent survey of fourth grade teachers showed positive impacts on their students through the use of PEACEZONE curriculum :

 
33.3% said "There were less office referrals"

100% said "Students showed improved self control"

33.3% said "Students showed improved thinking and problem solving"

33.3% said "Students showed improved cooperation skills"

 

Program Long-Term Success 

 Early prevention has been shown to increase children's resilience, reinforce positive behaviors, and promote social benefits to avoid future violence.

Program Success Monitored By  We survey all of our participants before and after.
Examples of Program Success  A recent survey of fourth grade teachersshowed positive impacts on their students through the use of PEACEZONE curriculum :

 
33.3% said "There were less office referrals"

100% said "Students showed improved self control"

33.3% said "Students showed improved thinking and problem solving"

33.3% said "Students showed improved cooperation skills"

 



Policy Work

We recognize change and violence prevention has to come from the bottom up and from the top down, this is why we work to influence policy to make our streets safer, for survivors of violence to have access to the services they need, and to enable our children to have brighter futures. We are aware that elected officials, policy makers, ministers, providers, law enforcement personal, judges, courts, defense attorneys and advocates are not always open to hearing the voices of survivors and this is because they do not know what to do or what to say. Survivors are the only ones that can share what their struggles and needs. We strive to bring these two communities together to come up with solutions and advocate for resources for services. We initiated Hear Our VOICES: Listening Hearing, a time when the Boston City council  provides a space where families who are impacted by violence can share their struggles and the many different and courageous strategies.
Budget  70,000
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
November 2011 Recommendations made to Governor Patrick with regards to Peace Institute’s Priorities Serving, Working and Responding to Survivors of Homicide Victims and NON- Fatal
Here are the finalized recommendations.  We just focused on the key recommendations rather than the other items, as these are the primary ones we are focused on moving forward now.
 
1.      Conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the state’s system of services supporting the needs of survivors and surviving victims and foster collaboration to establish a quality continuum of services for families being impacted by violence, starting with agencies and organizations being Funded by the state.
2.      Establish a Survivors of Homicide Victims Council for the state to focus on specialized needs of survivors of homicide victims and surviving victims (non-fatal) across the state.  This Council will also have two survivors and two non-fatal victims who will also serve on the Council.
3.      Implement a statewide crisis management response across the state to support the needs of all communities supported by violence, replicating the established Survivors of Homicide Victims Crisis Management Response established by the Louis D. Brown Peace Institute
4.      Provide resources for Survivors of Homicide Awareness Month, a state-wide community outreach and awareness event held November 20 –December 20 in honor of survivors across the state that have been impacted by homicide.
5.      Require mandatory survivor of homicide training/education for all clinicians, trauma response personnel, educators, youth workers, police officers, health centers, hospitals etc; including companies and organizations receiving state funds.
Program Long-Term Success  Established a survivor of homicide victims awareness month November 20-decemebr 20
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
Established a survivor of homicide victims awareness month November 20-decemebr 20
 

Survivors Outreach Services

The Survivors Outreach Services program assists families immediately after a murder, helping with personal matters, from coordinating the family’s support network, providing guidance, assisting with funeral planning, to navigating the criminal justice system.
 
Survivors Outreach Services (SOS) Department is the Heart of the Peace Institute work.  The program serves close to 1,000 victims annually and family members to help survivors heal. In partnership with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Bowdoin Street Health Center, the peace institute’s Survivors Outreach Services program provides specialized survivor-based approach for crisis management and outreach services to survivors of homicide victims in the aftermath of a homicide.
Goals and Objectives:
•             Educate and empower survivors on social service, justice system navigation, victims’ rights and resources.
•             Ensure families receive appropriate referrals for services, including mental health services, spiritual guidance, traditional and non-traditional therapies, legal assistance, safety planning, temporary housing or other social services that are culturally competent.
•             Outreach to survivors of homicide victims on a monthly basis to follow-up on needed services or connect to new opportunities for healing or leadership.
 
•             Convene monthly Peace Institute’s Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims Providers Network meetings.
 
•             Offer healing activities for survivors of homicides victims, utilizing Sand Tray World Play, Expressive Therapy, individual and family counseling, and support groups.
 
Budget  $100,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Families At-Risk Populations US
Program Short-Term Success 
In 2011, the Peace Institute
Served 42 of 62 homicides in the city of Boston, including direct services to 168 new survivors
  
Provide on-going support to 43 existing families across the state
  
85% of clients participate in healing services or receive clinical services with 50% continuing treatment.  
  
Provide on-going support to 43 existing families across the state
 
7,700 people benefited from the Peace Institute outreach efforts this year (70% survivors, 27% providers and 3% other).
 
200 survivors participated in leadership and advocacy activities, in addition to survivors organizing a recommendations meeting with Governor Deval Patrick on the needs of survivors of homicide victims across the state.
 
Program Long-Term Success  In 2006, there was a gap in the service delivery system for survivors of homicide victims. Tina Chery decided to forge a new path to healing and reconciliation through the creation of innovative programs, which teach and apply the core seven principles of peace (love, unity, faith, hope, courage, justice and forgiveness) anchored in restorative justice theories.
Program Success Monitored By  We conduct pre and post surveys.
Examples of Program Success 
In 2011 alone, the Peace Institute
Served 42 of 62 homicides in the city of Boston, including direct services to 168 new survivors
  
Provide on-going support to 43 existing families across the state
  
85% of clients participate in healing services or receive clinical services with 50% continuing treatment.  
  
Provide on-going support to 43 existing families across the state
 
7,700 people benefited from the Peace Institute outreach efforts this year (70% survivors, 27% providers and 3% other).
 
200 survivors participated in leadership and advocacy activities, in addition to survivors organizing a recommendations meeting with Governor Deval Patrick on the needs of survivors of homicide victims across the state.
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Clementina Maribel Chery
CEO Term Start Jan 2006
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Ms. Chéry is an internationally recognized peace education and violence prevention leader. She teaches and trains educators, law enforcement professionals, grassroots activists, community groups, university students and professors, faith-based communities, youth and survivor-peers. Originally born in Honduras, Central America, Clementina Chéry, known to most as “Tina,” was raised and currently lives in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. In 1993, she was a stay-at-home mom, who enjoyed spending time with her three children. On December 20, 1993, things abruptly changed for Ms. Chéry and her family. Tina Chéry’s oldest son, then fifteen-year-old Louis David Brown, was shot and killed on his way to a Christmas party given by a group called Teens Against Gang Violence (a violence prevention, intervention and peer leadership development program).

To honor her son’s memory, Ms. Chéry co-founded the Louis. D. Brown Peace Institute, an, education, outreach, healing, training and resource center committed to providing vital crisis management and counseling services to family members of homicide victims. Subsequently, she developed the Peace Curriculum, a nationally recognized program that teaches the value of peace to students from kindergarten to high school. It integrates reading, writing, classroom discussions and community service to enable students to examine, understand and practice the concepts of peace and peacemaking. The goal of the Peace Curriculum is to create an environment in which all young people can be safe. In a November 1996 report entitled “One City’s Success Story,” U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno cited the Louis D. Brown Peace Curriculum as one of the programs that contributed to the City of Boston’s reduction in juvenile crime.

To transform her pain and anger into action, Tina Chéry also began reaching out to other survivors of violence. Ms. Chéry’s goal was to give Boston’s community of survivors of violent crime a voice and a safe space and environment that her family didn’t have when Louis was killed. She founded the Survivors Outreach Services program to assist families immediately after a murder, helping with personal matters, from coordinating the family’s support network, providing guidance, assisting with funeral planning, to navigating the criminal justice system. Ms. Chéry saw a gap in the service delivery system for survivors of homicide victims. She decided to forge a new path to healing and reconciliation through the creation of innovative programs, which teach and apply the core seven principles of peace (love, unity, faith, hope, courage, justice and forgiveness) anchored in restorative justice theories.

On Mother’s Day, May 10, 1996, Ms. Chéry inaugurated the annual Mother’s Day Walk for Peace, a 3.6 mile-long walk around the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston. 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 30
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 75%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr Keith Harvey
Board Chair Company Affiliation American Friends Service Committee
Board Chair Term Jan 2008 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Connie Afshar Community Volunteer Voting
Jamie Bissonette Community Volunteer Voting
Clementina Chery Peace Institute Voting
Keith Harvey Community Volunteer Voting
Judith Lockhart Radtke Retired Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 95%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $518,000.00
Projected Expense $520,000.00
Form 990s

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents

2012 Review

2011 Review

2010 Review

2009 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Revenue $406,350 $438,563 $243,895
Total Expenses $393,625 $449,561 $286,672

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $116,626 $438,563 $243,895
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $220,795 -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2 -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $68,927 -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Program Expense $245,292 $264,946 $151,679
Administration Expense $113,613 $104,733 $101,991
Fundraising Expense $34,720 $79,882 $33,002
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.03 0.98 0.85
Program Expense/Total Expenses 62% 59% 53%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 19% 18% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Assets $77,617 $116,994 $112,018
Current Assets $57,118 $92,939 $109,478
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $13,461 $65,567 $49,593
Total Net Assets $64,156 $51,427 $62,425

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.24 1.42 2.21

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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