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Louis D. Brown Peace Institute

 15 Christopher Street
 Dorchester, MA 02122
[P] (617) 825-1917
[F] (617) 265-2278
www.ldbpeaceinstitute.org
[email protected]
Anthony Thomas
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INCORPORATED: 2009
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 26-3068254

LAST UPDATED: 11/28/2017
Organization DBA The Peace Institute
LDBPI
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The Peace Institute is a center of healing, teaching, and learning for families and communities dealing with murder, trauma, grief, and loss.

Our focuses are services, training, and advocacy to transform society's response to homicide so that all families impacted by murder are treated with dignity and compassion, regardless of the circumstances.
 
Our vision is to create and sustain communities where all people are valued and all families can live in peace. 

Mission Statement

The Peace Institute is a center of healing, teaching, and learning for families and communities dealing with murder, trauma, grief, and loss.

Our focuses are services, training, and advocacy to transform society's response to homicide so that all families impacted by murder are treated with dignity and compassion, regardless of the circumstances.
 
Our vision is to create and sustain communities where all people are valued and all families can live in peace. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $1,300,000.00
Projected Expense $1,300,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Massachusetts Survivors of Homicide Victims Network
  • Survivors Outreach Services
  • Training and Technical Assistance

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Peace Institute is a center of healing, teaching, and learning for families and communities dealing with murder, trauma, grief, and loss.

Our focuses are services, training, and advocacy to transform society's response to homicide so that all families impacted by murder are treated with dignity and compassion, regardless of the circumstances.
 
Our vision is to create and sustain communities where all people are valued and all families can live in peace. 

Background Statement

Clementina (Tina) Chéry’s eldest son Louis was a warm and talented young man who dreamed about being the first Black president. Louis was only fifteen years old in 1993 when he was killed in the crossfire of a shootout only a few blocks from his home. Tina co-founded the Peace Institute to honor her son Louis’ memory through teaching the value of peace. Because of the lack of homicide response protocol in the city of Boston, the Peace Institute became the primary place where survivors receive support and services in the aftermath of homicide.

More than twenty years later, the Peace Institute continues to be led by survivors of homicide victims. Our work is guided by the active use of the Seven Principles of Peace: love, unity, faith, hope, courage, justice, and forgiveness. Our approach is to acknowledge the pain and trauma violence causes, listen to everyone who is affected, collaborate with all those who want to make a difference, and mobilize for peace in our communities.

The Peace Institute’s multi-level approach uniquely positions us to create connections amongst impacted families, law enforcement, government agencies, service providers, faith-based groups, the academic community, and local businesses.  Our programs and services are grounded in the proven socio-ecological framework that peace starts from within and then extends to family, communities, and society. We remain committed to healing from the pain, shame, and blame that stigmatizes families and fuels cycles of violence.


Impact Statement

2016 was the Peace Institute’s most successful fundraising year ever and we’re on track to exceed that in 2017. In 2018, we will expand our staff team by 25% and move to a larger building with more space for client services and training our partners.

In the past year we've made major strides in service delivery, training, and advocacy.

The Peace Institute is expanding our client base for training and technical assistance. We recently trained the Miami Police Department, the Massachusetts Major City Chiefs Association, the Boston City Council, provided technical assistance to the Iowa Attorney General’s Office, and have a training contract for the coming year with the Boston Public Health commission.

The Peace Institute is working with the City of Boston to establish a Boston City Burial Fund for survivors of homicide victims so families can access emergency financial assistance to lay their loved one to rest with respect and dignity.

The Peace Institute organized a powerful hearing with survivor testimony and broad support for legislation to improve Victim Compensation. H.742 “An Act Amending Victim Compensation Statute” would shift the current state statute regulating Victim Compensation so that that the circumstances of a loved one's homicide cannot be used to determine a family's eligibility for funeral and burial reimbursement. Because of our long-standing partnerships and the value of our work, lead supporters of the legislation are Mayor Marty Walsh, District Attorney Dan Conley, and Boston Police Commissioner William Evans. This language was adopted as amendments to both the House and Senate Criminal Justice Omnibus bills that are currently being considered by a Conference Committee.

The Peace Institute launched the Survivors of Homicide Victims Network with more than 150 members across the state. Members of the network use their experience and expertise to inform, influence, and impact policy.

The Peace Institute continues to serve more than 90% of murder victims’ families in Boston. To do that, we partner with the major hospitals in Boston: Boston Medical Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. We also convene all of our community-based service partners through the Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims Providers Network every month.


Needs Statement

The Peace Institute seeks sustainers, investors, and sponsors to advance our mission. We are also looking for the following support:

 1. Fundraising Committee members 
 2. A new 5,000 - 10,000 square foot building to accommodate our growing staff and expanding program 
 3. Pro-bono marketing and public relations support for our training training and technical assistance services and publications 

CEO Statement

I was a stay‐at‐home mom in Dorchester who loved spending time with my children. On December 20, 1993 my fifteen‐year‐old son Louis was killed and our lives changed forever. Louis was passionate about making his community a more peaceful place and dreamed about being President. Despite the pain and sorrow of losing someone with such great promise, I co-founded the Peace Institute to honor Louis’ commitment to work for peace.   I want to end the myth that families in urban communities don’t raise their children to have goals and dreams. My community is so much more than a place where murder happens. I’m a visionary who brings people of all backgrounds together to create a world where all children are valued and families can live in peace. 


Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

The Peace Institute has provided direct services in 63 towns across Massachusetts. We have provided training and technical assistance to public health professionals and law enforcement officials in 75 towns in the Commonwealth, as well as cities across the country. 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Violence Shelters and Services
  2. Crime & Legal - Related - Youth Violence Prevention
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Massachusetts Survivors of Homicide Victims Network

The MA Survivors of Homicide Victims Network is a statewide network of survivors working together to impact, inform, and influence public policy. After many years of working together organically, the Survivors Network was formally launched in December 2016 and has almost 200 members across the state.

The Peace Institute and the Survivors Network convene the annual Survivors of Homicide Victims Awareness Month from November 20 to December 20. The Awareness Month is an effort to effort to educate the public and policymakers about the impact of murder on families and communities and recognize the diverse contributions of the survivor’s movement. Every year, members of the Network hold dozens of community events in recognition of the Awareness Month.

Budget  --
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Victims
Program Short-Term Success 

The MA Survivors Network convenes and collaborates regularly to support efforts to make positive change in our communities. Members receive training and resources to carry out their work including service programs, support groups, advocacy organizations to end gun violence, and scholarship funds in honor of their loved ones.


Program Long-Term Success  The MA Survivors Network will equip survivors of homicide to use their experience and expertise to have a meaningful impact on public health and safety policy in Massachusetts.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 

The Survivors Network actively collaborates to positively impact communities. In 2017, the Survivors Network focused on advocating to improve Victim Compensation. This legislation would shift the current state statute regulating Victim Compensation so that that the circumstances of a loved one’s homicide cannot be used to determine a family’s eligibility for funeral and burial reimbursement.

“Not only was the scrutinizing of my husband’s history demeaning to his character at his time of death, but also very antagonistic to me, mentally and emotionally for me to go through at the most terrifying, vulnerable point in my life,” survivor Ebony LePenn told the Judiciary Committee. “I’m left feeling defeated and unworthy of receiving the funds that we deserve as a family surviving such a horrible tragedy.”

The Peace Institute submitted a coalition letter of support signed by over forty organizations, faith congregations, law enforcement officials District Attorney Dan Conley and Boston Police Commissioner William Evans, and local businesses including Dolan Funeral Services, George Lopes Funeral Home, and JB. Johnson Funeral Home. Funeral Homes who accept the Victim Compensation application as a form of payment can be left with debt when claims are denied because of contributory conduct or be in the position of pressuring grieving families without the financial means to pay.

Members of the Survivors Network testified at the public hearing before the Judiciary Committee in September 2017. This hearing was the result of years of advocacy on behalf of survivors who have been re-triggered and re-traumatized by Victim Compensation denials due to the contributory conduct clause. In the wake of tragedies, the Commonwealth has the capacity to unite and support families whose loved ones were murdered. The legislation was included as amendments to both the House and Senate Criminal Justice Omnibus bills and is currently being considered by the Conference Committee. This unified effort and the progress of the legislation shows the power of survivors working together to improve their community.


Survivors Outreach Services

Through Survivors Outreach Services, our advocates provides emotional and practical support for families in the first 24-72 hours after a homicide happens and ongoing advocacy.

Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Victims Blacks, African Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 
Survivors Outreach Services serves dozens of families every year in their time of greatest need. Our advocates are survivors themselves who use personal experience and professional training to provide concrete support and guidance to families of murder victims so they're able to lay their loved one to rest with respect and dignity. 
 
Advocates provide: 
  • Personal understanding and validation
  • Safe and peaceful meeting place
  • Survivors Burial and Resource Guide & a Workbook for Grieving Children.
  • Memorial Peace Buttons & Memorial Funeral Programs.
  • Identify funerals home that will accept the state victim compensation.
  • Victim Compensation Application.
  • Information and referrals.  
Program Long-Term Success  For every person who is murdered, there are 8-10 relatives who are profoundly affected. All those relatives have friends, co-workers, and classmates who share in their grief. The way society responds to homicide is often so inadequate it's referred to as "secondary victimization." The Peace Institute meets an urgent need to treat all survivors with dignity and compassion while recognizing that responding to crisis is an essential component of interrupting cycles of violence in communities. In the long-term, our work to surround families of murder victims with support and services will reduce retaliatory violence and equip families with what they need to heal from grief and trauma. 
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 

"Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center’s partnership with the Peace Institute has allowed us to do concrete, meaningful work together to strengthen our communities and care for and support individuals and victims affected by violence." Dr. Kevin Tabb, MD, President and CEO,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

"If it hadn’t been for the Peace Institute, I don’t know how I would have gotten myself through the funeral of my 19-year-old son Derek, or the arraignment and the sentencing of his killer.The love, comfort, referrals to grief therapists, and practical suggestions kept me moving forward. With the help and encouragement of the Peace Institute, I contacted Derek’s many friends and told them, in the powerful words that only an angry mother, crazed with grief could deliver, “I do not want retaliation for Derek’s death. The vicious circle of violence and death cannot continue. End it here.”The driving force from the Peace Institute resonates with me to bring the message of peace to our churches, schools, the corridors of state government, and to all who hold on to hope, working toward a shared goal of peace." - Deidre Murphy, survivor


Training and Technical Assistance

TTAC provides training and tools to equip organizations to equitably and effectively serve all families impacted by murder.
Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Victims
Program Short-Term Success 
The Peace Institute is recognized as the leading homicide response agency in Massachusetts and our expertise is sought by organizations across the state and country. We are currently partnered with three trauma hospitals in Boston - Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brigham and Women's, and Boston Medical Center - who have purchased and implemented the Survivors Burial and Resource Guide so families do not leave hospitals empty-handed after their death of their loved one. Hospital staff are trained to serve surviving family members and make referrals to the Peace Institute and other community-based providers for additional support.
 
We convene the Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims Providers Network Monthly and work collaboratively with our partners to improve service delivery and coordination. We also work with schools to respond when a homicide impacts students. Our goal is to ensure all families of murder victims receive services and support so that they can lay their loved one to rest with respect and dignity and begin their healing journey.
 
Program Long-Term Success  The Peace Institute is working to make Boston a model city and Massachusetts a model state for effective and equitable homicide response. We are working collaboratively with survivors, providers, the faith community, policy makers, law enforcement officials, hospitals, and public health professionals to implement coordinated, consistent, and compassionate protocols. Through this collective work, we will ensure families and communities have the resources they need to heal and live in peace. 
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
In 2016, the Peace Institute convened the first ever Homicide Response Briefing for more than 100 law enforcement officials across the state of Massachusetts. 
 
In 2017, the Peace Institute provided training and technical assistance to more than seventy agencies including Boston Public Schools, the Miami Police Department, the Iowa Attorney General's Office, and the Massachusetts Major City Police Chiefs Association.
 
In 2018, the Peace Institute has a goal of training more 2,000 individual providers, public health professionals ,and law enforcement officials.  

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Chaplain Clementina Maribel Chery
CEO Term Start Jan 2006
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Chaplain Clementina M. Chéry is the co-founder, President, and CEO of the Louis D. Brown Peace Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Chaplain Chéry and her family founded the Peace Institute in 1994 after her fifteen-year old son Louis D. Brown was murdered in the crossfire of a shootout. With over two decades of experience as a survivor serving families impacted by murder, Chaplain Chéry has developed the best practices in the field of homicide response. 

Chaplain Chéry was chosen as a 2017 Barr Fellow for her effective, visionary, and collaborative leadership. She was also selected as a 2016 Social Innovator by the Social Innovation Forum. 

Chaplain Chéry has developed groundbreaking publications for families of murder victims and the providers who serve them, including “Always in My Heart: A Workbook for Grieving Children” (2011) and the Survivors Burial and Resource Guide (2013). The Survivors Burial and Resource Guide is the only tool available that offers step-by-step guidance to families of murder victims so that they can lay their loved one to rest with respect and dignity while managing the crisis and chaos after a homicide happens. 

 Chaplain Chéry has received countless awards in recognition of her courageous leadership and tireless peacemaking work. Most recently, Chéry was named one of Boston’s 100 most influential leaders of color in 2016 by Collette Phillips Communications, Inc. She was also given the 2016 Impact Award by Phillips Brooks House Association at Harvard University. Chaplain Chéry holds honorary Doctorate Degrees from College of the Holy Cross, Regis College, and Mount Ida College, She has also received The Chancellor’s Medal of Honor from the University of MA. She is a Lady of the Order of St. Gregory the Great, the highest honor bestowed by Pope John Paul II on a lay Catholic. She was ordained as a senior chaplain with the International Fellowship of Chaplain, Inc. in February of 2012.

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 10
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 75
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 10
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mrs. Judith Radtke
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Chair Term Jan 2013 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Constance Ashfar Community Volunteer Voting
Jamie Bissonette Community Volunteer Voting
Susan Carman Community Volunteer Voting
C. Monroe Chase Community Volunteer Voting
Clementina Chery Louis D. Brown Peace Institute Voting
Michael Connolly Community Volunteer Voting
Chris Dellea Community volunteer Voting
Jessica McNeil Community Volunteer Voting
Judith Radtke Retired Voting
Lydia Rodman Community Volunteer Voting
Adam Thomas Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 95%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $1,300,000.00
Projected Expense $1,300,000.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Review

2014 Review

2013 Review

2012 Review

2011 Review

2010 Review

2009 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $767,456 $480,586 $466,549
Total Expenses $871,435 $440,758 $355,638

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- $0 $0
Individual Contributions $471,569 $290,867 $266,534
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue $284,920 $156,405 $190,733
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- $56 $0
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events -- $0 $0
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $10,967 $33,258 $9,282

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $530,118 $269,044 $224,933
Administration Expense $167,770 $123,909 $93,112
Fundraising Expense $173,547 $47,805 $37,593
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.88 1.09 1.31
Program Expense/Total Expenses 61% 61% 63%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 37% 16% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $143,081 $226,965 $180,635
Current Assets $91,395 $164,424 $166,031
Long-Term Liabilities -- $0 $0
Current Liabilities $32,165 $12,070 $5,568
Total Net Assets $110,916 $214,895 $175,067

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose The Peace Institute is seeking a new building to house our growing staff and expanding program and training capacity.
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.84 13.62 29.82

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

The Peace Institute makes an impact at critical intervention points both in the aftermath of violence and over the long-term to build the capacity of communities to live in peace. Every year, the Peace Institute serves 40-50 new families whose loved one has been murdered. We also provide ongoing support to hundreds of survivors of individuals impacted by murder across Massachusetts. The way society responds to homicide is often so inadequate it's referred to as "secondary victimization." Our ultimate goal is to transform society's response to homicide so all impacted families are treated with dignity and compassion, regardless of the circumstances. 


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

The Peace Institute's work is survivor-led and trauma-informed. We have two decades of experience serving families impacted by murder. Our programs and services are grounded in the Center for Disease Control’s social-ecological framework that interventions are needed at multiple levels in order to interrupt cycles of violence.

The Peace Institute is the only organization in Massachusetts that supports families in the immediate aftermath of their loved one's murder. We provide emotional and practical support so that families can lay their loved one to rest with respect and dignity. We also provide ongoing resources and services in the months and years after homicide. To do that, we partner with the major hospitals in Boston as well as other community-based agencies.  
 

In addition to the services we provide to families, we build their capacity peacemaking process in order to reduce retaliatory violence with training and leadership development. Survivors join the Massachusetts Survivors of Homicide Victims Network and use their lived experiences and expertise to positively impact public health, public safety, and criminal justice policies in Boston and beyond. These families have founded their own organizations such as Mothers for Justice and Equality and the Healing and Encouragement/Survivor of Homicide Ministry at Morning Star Baptist Church.

Our expertise is sought after by public health officials across the state and country. We convene these stakeholders through the Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims Providers Network to continually improve homicide response practices and infrastructure in the Commonwealth. The PI has trained hundreds of providers and is well poised to equip thousands more through our recently launched Training & Technical Assistance Center. TTAC offers training and tools so organizations can institute more effective and equitable homicide response protocols.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

The Peace Institute’s greatest assets are our expertise as survivors and experience serving survivors. We are able to translate the immediate needs of families impacted by violence into protocols for those agencies tasked with responding to violence in our communities. Our tools and trainings capture the best practices in the field and they can lay the groundwork for more peaceful communities in Boston and beyond. The Peace Institute published the Survivor’s Burial Resource Guide, a comprehensive guide for families through the aftermath of violent death. We also published a workbook for grieving children. 

 The Peace Institute has longstanding relationships with members of law enforcement, the District Attorney’s office, and other court officials who impact the families we serve. We strive to keep open lines of communication so that families have access to the information and resources they need to navigate the justice system. The Peace Institute also nurtures reciprocal relationships with churches and community-based organizations so we can work together to meet the emotional, spiritual, and practical needs of families in the aftermath of violence. We have trusted relationships with funeral homes and cemeteries so that we can demystify the burial process and ensure families are well cared for. The Peace Institute regularly creates exchanges between community members and stakeholders from government agencies, the faith community, and local businesses so that we can move forward from crisis toward a vision of more peaceful communities.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

The Peace Institute is committed to serving families impacted by murder with evolving programming that responds to their needs and reflects the reality of our communities. We have prioritized increasing our capacity to measure the impact of our work exemplified by our partnership with researchers at the UMass Boston School of Applied Sociology and hiring a project manager responsible for program evaluations. 

 

The Peace Institute maintains a client database to capture the many people we serve, their demographics, and what services they receive. Our clients include families of homicide victims, families of incarcerated people, and inmates who are participating in our Peace from Within workshops. A critical benchmark for the Peace Institute is the percentage of families of homicide victims we serve annually, which is consistently over 90%. The Peace Institute has also implemented a monthly performance management system for all employees to report on their activities and outcomes.

 

We monitor the efficacy of the Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims Providers Network by measuring the levels of communication and coordination after a homicide. One key indicator is the number of referrals given and received through the network.

Because of the sensitive and nuanced nature of our work, we embrace qualitative evaluation strategies to document families’ journeys toward finding a sense of meaning, purpose, and peace. We conduct pre and post evaluations from every program event and collect stories and testimony from families.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

The Peace Institute has expanded and evolved over the past twenty years in order to best serve families impacted by violence. We continue to be the leading homicide response agency. The services and support we provide to families of murder victims improve public safety by decreasing acts of retaliatory violence. Our programming empowers survivors to stay engaged with peacemaking throughout their healing process. Survivors we’ve served have gone on to found dozens of organizations, projects, and memorial funds toward the unified goal of living in peace. The Peace Institute is dedicated to nurturing these efforts with mentoring, training, and keeping survivors connected through the Massachusetts Survivors of Homicide Victims Network.

The Peace Institute recognizes that we cannot reach every person impacted by violence directly, so we've launched the Training and Technical Assistance Center to share training and tools with providers so that they can respond equitably and effectively when a homicide happens.