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UTEC, Inc.

 15 Warren Street, #3
 Lowell, MA 01852
[P] (978) 856-3906
[F] (978) 654-6727
www.utec-lowell.org
[email protected]
Dawn Grenier
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INCORPORATED: 1999
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 38-3669532

LAST UPDATED: 03/22/2018
Organization DBA UTEC
Cafe UTEC
UTEC Mattress Recycling
Former Names United Teen Equality Center (2015)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

UTEC’s mission and promise is to ignite and nurture the ambition of our most disengaged young people to trade violence and poverty for social and economic success.

Mission Statement

UTEC’s mission and promise is to ignite and nurture the ambition of our most disengaged young people to trade violence and poverty for social and economic success.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $6,540,083.00
Projected Expense $6,264,963.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Case Management with Transitional Coaches
  • Civic Engagement & Youth Organizing
  • Education: High School Equivalency Degree
  • Streetworker Outreach & Peacemaking
  • Workforce Development and Social Enterprises

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

UTEC’s mission and promise is to ignite and nurture the ambition of our most disengaged young people to trade violence and poverty for social and economic success.


Background Statement

UTEC was founded in Lowell in 1999 by young people driven to develop their own teen center in response to gang violence. Today, UTEC’s nationally recognized model begins with intensive street outreach and gang peacemaking, along with support for court-involved youth; that is, engaging our most disconnected youth by meeting them “where they’re at” and facilitating changes in their goals and priorities. Each young person in our target population (17-25, dropped out of school, gang or criminally involved, or pregnant/parenting) receives up to three years of intensive case management designed to help them overcome personal, health, and institutional barriers to improving their lives.

UTEC provides workforce training through a step-by-step involvement in our social enterprises. Project-based educational programming is provided through the new HiSET process which leads to a high school equivalency degree. Social justice education and civic involvement are embedded in all programming, with special emphasis on youth becoming engaged in enriching their community. Ultimately, UTEC’s unique model can provide a pathway from the street to a rewarding life in the community for youth most often overlooked and considered “unreachable.” 

UTEC’s unique insight is our long-term commitment to our proven risk youth, with job training provided intentionally through real-world social enterprise experience that extends across multiple years, multiple chances, and multiple pathways. We also understand the barriers youth face and know that youth will relapse and make poor decisions after years of trauma, criminal involvement, gang involvement, and/or unhealthy relationships. UTEC’s innovation is in our blend of high work performance expectations with our training model that assumes relapse, and thus allows our young people to make mistakes within our supportive Social Enterprises rather than in higher-stakes external employment. 


 


Impact Statement

In FY17, UTEC served 136 young people (ages 17-25) in our enrollment programs and more than 750 through Streetworker and community outreach. Of enrolled young adults, 93% had a criminal record, 72% were gang-involved, 69% lacked a high school credential, and 36% were young parents. 96% met more than one of these risk factors, including 11% who met all four. Many have experienced trauma, including domestic violence and abuse, and all are eligible for UTEC’s onsite mental health and substance abuse counseling services. 
 
Young Adult Outcomes
Highlights for our young people from the past year (FY17) include:
 
• 99% of UTEC enrolled young people had no new convictions;
• 90% of UTEC enrolled young people had no new arrests;
• 32% of young people who attended HiSET classes earned their credential this year;
Of participants who completed programming 2 years ago:
 
• 94% had no new arrests since leaving UTEC;
• 78% are currently employed and/or enrolled in post-secondary education.

Needs Statement

 Top 5 Pressing Needs in FY18/19:

1. UTEC seeks to grow our social enterprises to meet our bold goal of providing a job slot to every young adult who returns to our communities from incarceration. To do so, we must increase the number of job slots and extend the time that youth gain work experience in our enterprises before transitioning into external employment. 

2. Increasing the Streetworker team’s size will allow us to further saturate high-crime neighborhoods, and, by doing so, better identify and respond to conflicts outside of UTEC. Streetworker capacity for reentry services will also expand, including an increased number of pre-release visits to detention and correctional facilities to assist young adults in a positive transition back to our communities.

3. We aim to increase youth engagement and retention by working toward reducing Transitional Coaches’ portfolio ratio to 1:15.

4. We will scale up enrollment of our young adults' children (ages 0-5) in the 2Gen Center @ UTEC, our licensed onsite early education center, to our maximum capacity of 35 children. We will also build two-generation program elements to increase parenting skills and family engagement.

5. UTEC’s Woodworking social enterprise will invest in additional equipment and more advanced technology. This social enterprise can both increase job slots available and improve workforce skills for young adults in the trades with the addition of CNC machinery and other advanced-manufacturing resources.


CEO Statement

In Lowell and Lawrence, the intersection of poverty and prejudice create a lack of opportunities that are distinctly different from youth of more affluent backgrounds.

While the circumstances that lead to youth’s gang involvement, criminal involvement, or pregnancy may differ, out-of-school youth living in poverty who have at least one of these barriers often have not had adult role models or a community (i.e., the social capital) to help them navigate institutions and systems that will lead to their employment or educational success. They have not found themselves in environments that encourage or incentivize healthy and prosocial decisions or acknowledged them when they do make such decisions. Many youth are stuck in holding patterns of poor decision-making, which their social environments do not encourage them to break out of. Best practices for mentoring point to the importance of a sustained relationship of at least 1 year.

In addition to the lack of prosocial networks, the nature of the problem is confounded by the fact that many such youth who become gang or criminally involved will have higher rates of educational interruption and eventually drop out of school. The level of educational attainment dramatically decreases once a young person has contact with law enforcement, particularly when incarcerated as a juvenile.

In addition, many youth living in poverty have the pressing need to provide financial support to their families and often put their education or long-term goals aside to offer immediate support. As a result of their education being interrupted, they have lost time to develop skills and do not see themselves on a path toward secondary/post-secondary education or have clear plans for stable employment. In short, criminal activity leads to a disruption of education, which eventually leads to increased likelihood of further criminal involvement and decreased employment opportunities/lifetime earnings.

This problem is distinct because there is a scarcity of programming that focuses on engaging proven-risk youth who meet the criteria outlined here. These youth are often left for law enforcement to deal with, since it’s assumed that they are “too far gone.” UTEC believes in the inherent potential of every young person to make positive progress.

 


Board Chair Statement



Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
NORTHEAST REGION, MA

UTEC serves young adults in Lowell and Lawrence, MA and facilitates a statewide youth advocacy coalition (Teens Leading the Way). In 2018, we will begin to provide more formal services to young adults from Haverhill, as well.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Employment - Job Training
  3. Education - Preschools

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Case Management with Transitional Coaches

After a Streetworker begins a consistent relationship with a proven-risk young person, he/she will refer them to a transitional coach (TC), UTEC’s name for case managers.

Youth develop a one-to-one relationship (including a service plan) with a TC and work on major life challenges/obstacles (i.e. housing, finances, family relations, physical/emotional health, and legal matters).  

Youth then enter one of our Workforce Development Social Enterprises. TCs have a caseload of 15 youth; average of 2 contacts/week for each youth for at least 1.5 hours, providing follow up with youth for two years after their program graduation to track progress toward their long-term outcomes.
Budget  $550,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

Transitional coaches play key support roles to help enrolled youth achieve success across all program centers (peacemaking, workforce development, education, and civic engagement). Expected short term outcomes include: 1. No arrests while at UTEC 2. Obtainment of GED or high school diploma 3. Increased employability as demonstrated by stage progression in WFD, positive performance reviews and placement in outside employment; 4. Decreased gang involvement; and 5. Increased civic engagement by participating in organizing activities and events at UTEC.

Program Long-Term Success 

Transitional coaches continue to follow up with youth for two years after they leave UTEC to help ensure they achieve the following long term outcomes: 1. No arrests after leaving UTEC; 2. Enrollment in college or a vocational program; 3. Permanent employment earning at least $12.50/hr; 4. Ceased gang involvement; and 5. Participation in civic engagement outside of UTEC. 

Program Success Monitored By 

To define the "social and economic success" of our mission in measurable terms, UTEC defines short- and longer-term indicators for our young people in four specific outcome areas: Increased Educational Attainment, Increased Employability and Financial Health, Ceased Criminal and Gang Activity, and Increased Civic Engagement.

 

All program data and documentation is tracked in our agency-wide client database, Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), and overseen by our Evaluation Manager. Intermediate and long-term outcomes are measured through UTEC’s longer-term assessment tool, completed via follow up phone calls and visits with the youth by his/her Transitional Coach. Through an analysis of all youth outcomes, UTEC can better understand what programs are contributing to youth gains and why, and improve programming to increase UTEC’s rates of success with young people.

Examples of Program Success 

Between October 2010 and May 2012, UTEC engaged in an evaluation of its programming, in partnership with Suffolk University. A remarkable 100% of youth interviewed reported that they value the support that they receive from their Transitional Coach, or case manager. Transitional Coaches contribute directly to outcomes in all other program areas by helping youth to address any barriers to success.


Civic Engagement & Youth Organizing

Youth who participate in the Workforce Development and Social Enterprise program are exposed to the principles of civic engagement and youth organizing and learn skills that will allow them to become active members of their communities.
 
UTEC youth are engaged in local-level community projects and can participate in Teens Leading the Way. UTEC is the lead agency for Teens Leading the Way, a statewide, youth-led coalition that advocates around public-policy issues affecting young people.
 
Budget  $185,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

By Year 3 of enrollment (program completion), 100% of youth who are eligible will register to vote; 50% of youth will demonstrate an increased interest in and sense of responsibility for community involvement; and 50% of youth will show an increase of self-efficacy for civic and community action.

Program Long-Term Success 

Two years following the completion of programming at UTEC, 25% of youth will voluntarily participate in civic and community action.

Program Success Monitored By 

To define the "social and economic success" of our mission in measurable terms, UTEC defines short- and longer-term indicators for our young people in four specific outcome areas: Increased Educational Attainment, Increased Employability and Financial Health, Ceased Criminal and Gang Activity, and Increased Civic Engagement.

All program data and documentation is tracked in our agency-wide client database, Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), and overseen by our Evaluation Manager. Intermediate and long-term outcomes are measured through UTEC’s longer-term assessment tool, completed via follow up phone calls and visits with the youth by his/her Transitional Coach. Through an analysis of all youth outcomes, UTEC can better understand what programs are contributing to youth gains and why, and improve programming to increase UTEC’s rates of success with young people.

Examples of Program Success 

UTEC’s local organizing campaign, Vote 17, garnered local and national support and media attention, and progressed further through the legislative process than any other bill of its kind.

Teens Leading the Way, a statewide, youth-led coalition for policymaking (for which UTEC is the lead agency) was among 4 finalists in the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network’s Excellence Award in Advocacy (2011). TLTW is now leading an effort to redact juvenile sentences that are now barriers to youth finding employment or participating in educational programs.


Education: High School Equivalency Degree

UTEC offers an alternative education program tailored for our proven-risk youth.

HiSET (formerly GED) classes are offered 4 days/week (4 hours daily) and a minimum of 15 hours are required of all youth who are enrolled in the Workforce Development and Social Enterprises Program. The goal is for all youth to pass state-administered tests and receive high school equivalency degrees.
Budget  $142,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

At program completion (by end of Year 3 of enrollment), 50% of youth will obtain their HiSET will enroll in a two-year or four-year college or technical school certification program.

Program Long-Term Success 

Two years after leaving UTEC, 25% of youth who enroll in college or a certification program will complete a second year of college or graduate from a technical school certification program.

Program Success Monitored By 

To define the "social and economic success" of our mission in measurable terms, UTEC defines short- and longer-term indicators for our young people in four specific outcome areas: Increased Educational Attainment, Increased Employability and Financial Health, Ceased Criminal and Gang Activity, and Increased Civic Engagement.

All program data and documentation is tracked in our agency-wide client database, Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), and overseen by our Evaluation Manager. Intermediate and long-term outcomes are measured through UTEC’s longer-term assessment tool, completed via follow up phone calls and visits with the youth by his/her Transitional Coach. Through an analysis of all youth outcomes, UTEC can better understand what programs are contributing to youth gains and why, and improve programming to increase UTEC’s rates of success with young people.

Examples of Program Success 

UTEC serves 40 youth consistently in HiSET classes, and 7 youth annually attained their high school equivalency degree. An additional 11 youth passed 1 or more tests in pursuit of their high school credential.


Streetworker Outreach & Peacemaking

UTEC’s nationally recognized model begins with intensive street outreach and gang peacemaking, reaching out to the most disconnected youth by meeting them “where they’re at” and facilitating a peace process between rival gang leaders. UTEC Street Workers are typically members of the community who intervene to prevent conflict and retaliation, and in some programs, also connect individuals with needed services, such as housing and job training.
 
UTEC’s Streetworker program has five important factors that contribute to its success and sustainability:

·         Involvement of youth in hiring street outreach workers

·         Investment in quality training for the street outreach workers

·         Providing street outreach workers with a comprehensive benefits package and team retreats to prevent staff turnover and burnout

·         Establishment of community partnerships

·         Incorporation of peacemaking into outreach

Budget  $325,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

At program completion (by end of Year 3 of enrollment), 80% of youth will have no arrests or violations of probation for six consecutive months, and 75% of youth will have no gang activity for six consecutive months.

Program Long-Term Success 

Two years following the completion of programming at UTEC, 80% of youth will have no arrests or violations of probation for two years, and 75% of youth will have no gang activity for two years.

Program Success Monitored By 

To define the "social and economic success" of our mission in measurable terms, UTEC defines short- and longer-term indicators for our young people in four specific outcome areas: Increased Educational Attainment, Increased Employability and Financial Health, Ceased Criminal and Gang Activity, and Increased Civic Engagement.

All program data and documentation is tracked in our agency-wide client database, Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), and overseen by our Evaluation Manager. Intermediate and long-term outcomes are measured through UTEC’s longer-term assessment tool, completed via follow up phone calls and visits with the youth by his/her Transitional Coach. Through an analysis of all youth outcomes, UTEC can better understand what programs are contributing to youth gains and why, and improve programming to increase UTEC’s rates of success with young people.

Examples of Program Success 

UTEC’s model has demonstrated success in helping youth to avoid arrests and recidivism, developing transitional services, and connecting youth to community.


Workforce Development and Social Enterprises

UTEC's target youth participate in work crews that blend transitional employment soft skills development with industry skills in culinary arts, Cafe UTEC, mattress recycling, and woodworking. With each crew also structured as its own social enterprise, youth work up to 20 hours/week for minimum wage, 4 days/ week for 5 hours each. Concurrently, youth enroll in UTEC's high school equivalency degree classes and participate in weekly life-skills and professional development workshops. With opportunity to move to higher levels in their work crew, youth are expected to work in this program for a minimum of 9-18 months.
Budget  $1,400,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

At program completion (by end of Year 3 of enrollment), 80% of youth will develop job readiness skills so that they can find and maintain employment so that they will 1. secure a job and 2. maintain employment for at least three to six consecutive months.

Program Long-Term Success 

Two years following the completion of programming at UTEC, 70% of youth who enrolled in the Workforce Development Center will 1. secure a job and 2. maintain employment for at least twelve consecutive months.

Program Success Monitored By 

To define the "social and economic success" of our mission in measurable terms, UTEC defines short- and longer-term indicators for our young people in four specific outcome areas: Increased Educational Attainment, Increased Employability and Financial Health, Ceased Criminal and Gang Activity, and Increased Civic Engagement.

All program data and documentation is tracked in our agency-wide client database, Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), and overseen by Evaluation Manager. Intermediate and long-term outcomes are measured through UTEC’s longer-term assessment tool, completed via follow up phone calls and visits with the youth by his/her Transitional Coach. Through an analysis of all youth outcomes, UTEC can better understand what programs are contributing to youth gains and why, and improve programming to increase UTEC’s rates of success with young people.

Examples of Program Success 

Social Impact Research (SIR), the independent research department of Root Cause, analyzed UTEC's Workforce Development and Social Enterprise (WDSE) program between March 2013 and May 2013. SIR compared the organization against a set of standardized indicators in two categories: program performance and organizational health. Based on this analysis, WDSE was classified as a high performing program. The report found that participants have the opportunity to develop the skills necessary for many trades and an understanding of how careers intersect. It also found that UTEC's employer partnerships helped youth secure jobs.

 

Suffolk University completed an evaluation of our Workforce Development program in June 2012. Findings included that 87% of youth who enrolled in WFD between September 2010 and May 2012 were either employed, continuing training within WFD, or working on personal goals with their case managers. Additionally, 89% of youth felt that WFD would help them achieve their goals.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Service Enterprises and Sustainability

Sustainability is a driving theme in all of UTEC's work. At the individual level, we see it on a daily basis as young people, otherwise overlooked and labeled as the most "at-risk" in our community, achieve their own personal goals. At an agency level, it is evident in our concept of how we operate our workforce programming as sustainable, revenue-generating social enterprises.


UTEC’s Social Enterprises are intended to provide a range of work experience for our youth to develop workforce competencies as well as basic skills in specific trades. Programming emphasizes the basic soft skills that are needed for long-term success: reliable attendance, appropriate personal presentation, group work and communication, and ability to follow directions. Youths participating in our job training programs are also required to participate in HiSET instruction, which will enable them to acquire high school equivalency credentials.

The value to the organization of Social Enterprises is a steadily rising revenue stream. In fiscal year 2013, the agency earned $68,000 and in fiscal year 2014 the number rose to $93,500. By FY16, more than $484,000 was earned through social enterprises.  The goal is to reach 20% of agency total revenues being generated by the Social Enterprises.

Geography and Individual Giving

The other dimension of Sustainability is our outreach to individual donors. In spite of their relative proximity to Boston, both Lowell and Lawrence fall outside of the “Route 128 loop” that many area foundations use to define greater Boston. A handful of smaller family foundations are specifically committed to Lowell or Lawrence, but these limited resources are simply no match for the substantial needs in these Gateway Cities. Lowell non-profits have successfully competed for a number of state grants related to youth violence prevention, job training, and education, but private philanthropy continues to be anchored in Boston – with a few notable exceptions.

You, the individual donor, can help us jump that dynamic by expanding the boundaries of your philanthropy. Individual donors, attracted by our work with proven risk youth, are beginning to take greater notice of UTEC. Our goal for fiscal year 2017 is to raise $1,131,800 (approaching 20% of our total revenue) from individuals, a big increase from just a few years ago, but possible if we can get our message out to more people.

 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Gregg Croteau MSW
CEO Term Start Feb 2000
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Hired as UTEC’s first executive director by the founding group of teens and community leaders, Gregg has overseen the growth of the agency from a grassroots safe haven to a nationally recognized youth development agency. In 2014, he received the Greatest Contribution to Social Work Practice Award from the National Association of Social Workers.

Gregg came to UTEC with youthwork experience that ranged from streetwork to program development in Detroit, East Boston, and his hometown of Revere, MA. With an interest in Vietnamese culture stemming from his work with gang-involved Southeast Asian youth in the Boston area, he spent two years working and conducting research in Hanoi, Vietnam, gaining fluency in Vietnamese language and history.

He has been appointed to a number of city and state commissions, including the Governor’s Anti-Crime Council, Governor’s Advisory Council on Refugees and Immigrants, and the Massachusetts Health Disparities Council. He has presented at various conferences locally and nationally, and has testified at the state and federal levels, including a 2007 Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on gang violence through the invitation of the late Senator Edward M. Kennedy. He has received recognition ranging from the prestigious Robert Wood Johnson Community Health Leader Award in 2006 to the Youth Advocacy Foundation’s Commitment to Justice Award in 2012.

Gregg received his B.A. from Wesleyan University (majoring in East Asian Studies), while receiving his Masters of Social Work, along with associated masters coursework in Southeast Asian Studies, from the University of Michigan.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ed Frechette MPA Director of Social Enterprise Partnerships --
Sue Gladstone Major Gifts Officer --
Terri Steingrebe Chief Financial Officer --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
"Committed Advocacy" Award Given to Teens Leading the Way Citizens for Juvenile Justice 2016
UTEC Highlighted as Model Program for Young Adults in the Justice System National Institute of Justice 2016
Greatest Contribution to Social Work Practice Award National Association of Social Workers 2014
Veronica Award for Outstanding Service in Transformational Relationships Superstar Foundation 2013
Martin Luther King, Jr. Humanitarian Award University of Massachusetts-Lowell 2012
Innovation Award for Nonprofits Small Business Association of New England 2011
Neighborhood Builder Award Bank of America 2008
Social Innovator Award for Creating Opportunities for Disadvantaged Youth Social Innovation Forum 2008
Community Health Leader Award Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 2006

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

The Lowell Police Department works closely with UTEC Streetworkers on gang intervention and violence prevention issues. We work in community partnerships on federal programs such as Project Safe Neighborhoods. We are also working with them on a reentry partnership utilizing a Department of Justice Second Chance grant. At the state level, we have partnered for years with the Lowell Police Department to implement the Shannon Anti-Gang program and, since 2011, on the Safe and Successful Youth Initiative which targets services to young men who are most likely to experience or commit violence. 

UTEC’s Transitional Coaches work closely with The Center for Hope and Healing to address domestic violence issues.  The Lowell Mental Health Association provides cognitive behavioral therapy at our program center. UTEC also work closely with the Lowell Community Health Center, which offers health insurance enrollment and care for nearly half of our youth population.

Mill City Grows, an urban farming and gardening nonprofit, supplies locally-grown produce to UTEC’s culinary social enterprises and offers workshops to our youth on food production, preparation, and nutrition. UTEC youth also have opportunities to work on Mill City Grows Urban Farm, just blocks from our program center. For our early education center and two-generation programming, UTEC is collaborating with Imajine That. 

 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Potential for Long-Term, Lasting Savings – A Public Benefit

We strongly believe that UTEC’s outcomes-focused work with our proven-risk population can serve as a clear blueprint for long term savings for various public costs often associated with this population. The following are but a sampling of areas where UTEC’s model can provide a cost-efficient alternative to public costs incurred:

Incarceration: The Massachusetts DOC spent $45,502.19 per inmate per year in 2011. More than 50% of all proven-risk young men in the state recidivate within 3 years of release.

Health: According to the White House report entitled “The Economic Value of Opportunity Youth,” the average “opportunity youth” has a public health care burden of $3,490 each year while the average youth has a $1,110 public health burden, resulting in a differential cost of approximately $2,380. Moreover, the population that UTEC serves is of even greater risk, likely even more costly, and may never stop being a public health care burden.

Education and Employment: As most aptly stated by Andrew Sum in his 2009 article entitled The Consequences of Dropping Out of High School, “Over their working lives, the average high school dropout will have a negative net fiscal contribution to society of nearly $5,200 while the average high school graduate generates a positive lifetime net fiscal contribution of $287,000. The average high school dropout will cost taxpayers over $292,000 in lower tax revenues, higher cash and in-kind transfer costs, and imposed incarceration costs relative to an average high school graduate.” 

In summary, in what is often regarded as the seminal publication on this topic, Mark Cohen summarizes in The Monetary Value of Saving a High Risk Youth:  “…the typical career criminal causes $1.3-1.5 million in external costs; a heavy drug user, $370,000 to $970,000; and a high school drop‐out, $243,000 to $388,000. Eliminating duplication between crimes committed by individuals who are both heavy drug users and career criminals results in an overall estimate of the monetary value of saving a high risk youth of $1.7 million to $2.3 million.

In comparison to these life-time costs, we strongly believe that UTEC’s model offers a unique and sustainable savings pathway for taxpayers and policymakers, both locally and nationally.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 43
Number of Part Time Staff 12
Number of Volunteers 21
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 10
Caucasian: 36
Hispanic/Latino: 9
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 3
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 40
Male: 32
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. M. Scott Mellen
Board Chair Company Affiliation wTe Corporation
Board Chair Term Jan 2018 - July 2020
Board Co-Chair Kenneth Lavalle
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Enterprise Bank
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Joe Babiec Mission First Strategy LLC Voting
David Brown Enterprise Bank and Community Trust Voting
Diana Frothingham LeadWell Partners --
Belinda Juran WilmerHale Voting
Kenneth Lavallee Lowell Police Department (retired) Voting
Neil Maniar PhD, MPH MPH Program Director at Northeastern University --
Scott Mellen wTe Corporation Voting
Tim Nichols Ropes & Gray LLP Voting
Susan Smith Lowell High School - Student Support Services Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $6,648,651 $5,078,889 $4,309,369
Total Expenses $5,715,669 $4,991,188 $4,622,458

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $3,008,625 $1,872,256 $1,571,861
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $2,881,082 $2,904,230 $2,169,934
Investment Income, Net of Losses $251,090 $239,198 $127,302
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $11,744 $10,213 $121,806
Revenue In-Kind $36,656 $25,660 $56,775
Other $459,454 $27,332 $261,691

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $4,544,252 $3,910,226 $3,459,767
Administration Expense $844,052 $758,858 $797,711
Fundraising Expense $327,365 $322,104 $364,980
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.16 1.02 0.93
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 78% 75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 11% 17% 22%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $14,843,213 $13,734,022 $27,417,487
Current Assets $1,943,573 $1,088,471 $3,803,247
Long-Term Liabilities $4,627,122 $4,340,431 $20,067,550
Current Liabilities $891,841 $1,913,943 $472,345
Total Net Assets $9,324,250 $7,479,648 $6,877,592

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.18 0.57 8.05

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 31% 32% 73%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In FY 14 we experienced a negative cash flow at end of year, but overall positive change in net assets. In FY 15 we experienced the opposite, positive cash flow and negative change in assets. This comes from a steep increase in temporary restricted net assets to be used towards capacity building projects which were used for such purposes, and then not replaced. The timing of a number of these grant releases (just after the start of the fiscal) had a negative impact on cash flows in FY 14. This was part of UTEC’s strategic plan, and did not cause a disruption of normal operations.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

UTEC’s goal is to ensure social and economic success for proven-risk youth by supporting long-term change through sustained relationships with caring adults and programs tailored to youth’s needs.

UTEC defines our target population as:

1. 16-24 years old; 
2. Out of school and without a high school credential;
3. Residing in either Lowell or Lawrence; and 
4. Gang-involved, criminally-involved, and/or young parents.

UTEC envisions a society in which: 

• All young people pursue and cultivate healthy relationships and make healthy choices. They belong to a supportive and diverse social network that is free from violence, crime, and other unsafe situations. 
• All young people are well-prepared to determine their own futures. Young people are self-reliant; they are also self-advocates and know how to seek support when it’s needed. 
• All young people value continual learning and critical thinking, in the classroom and beyond, and seek to understand themselves, their communities, and the underlying root cause forces that affect their lives.

• All young people believe that positive change can indeed happen, both in their personal lives and in their own community.

UTEC measures the “social and economic success” of our mission statement through three defined outcome areas:
• Educational Attainment
• Employment 
• Reduced recidivism and criminal activity

In fiscal year 2015, our Transitional Coaches served 132 youth as part of UTEC's integrated programming track. Of these youth, 84% had a criminal history, 39% were gang-involved, 84% lacked a high school credential, and 50% were parenting or expecting. 

Of youth engaged in FY2015, 85% demonstrated an increase in work performance reviews, and 50% of those without a high school degree obtained their high school equivalency credential. Additionally, 84% who attended workforce programming had no new arrests, and 100% had no new convictions. In addition, of youth who completed UTEC programming 2 years ago, 87% have no been arrested since leaving UTEC, and 83% are currently employed. 

These outcomes compare favorably to statistics for the state of Massachusetts, where 1% of adults without a high school credential pass the GED test, 1 in 7 young adults (ages 16-24) are unemployed, and 60% of inmates and 74% of youth exiting juvenile justice facilities re-offend within 6 years.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Building on research about the importance of structured training programs, sustained mentoring relationships and intensive case management as strongly correlated with improved outcomes for proven-risk youth, UTEC utilizes the following strategies:
 
1. Street Outreach and Gang Peacemaking: Street outreach ensures that we meet young people "where they're at" and serves as the starting point of UTEC's model. Streetworkers conduct daily outreach and “crisis positioning” to make initial contact and build relationships with the highest risk youth in our community who are currently disengaged.
 
2. Transitional Coaching: Transitional Coaches work with enrolled youth to develop a one-on-one relationship and create a service plan overcome challenges and obstacles. Their involvement continues all the way through a young person’s graduation from the integrated model. TCs help youth access health insurance coverage, housing applications, SNAP benefits and other community resources.
 
3. Workforce Training: UTEC offers youth paid on-the-job experience. We focus on a pathway that starts with transitional employment and leads into opportunities for youth to be involved in the running of our own social enterprises. Youth learn industry-specific skills and earn industry-recognized credentials (ServSafe and/or OSHA certifications). Most importantly, youth develop the interpersonal and life skills required to excel in any workplace.
 
4. Alternative Education:  As part of their participation in the workforce development program, youth are also required to participate in UTEC's HiSET (formerly GED) class. Youth spend approximately 10-12 hours per week as part of their overall schedule. HiSET is taught by a certified teacher employed by Lowell Adult Education, with tutoring support from UTEC’s AmeriCorps members. Small learning classes are an integral component of the program. The curriculum is very much based upon a project-based learning framework and social justice integration.
 
5. Youth Organizing and Civic Engagement: UTEC's organizing programs expose target youth to principles of social justice (building on the themes our youth learn through required Social Justice workshops) and community organizing. Youth learn skills that allow them to become more involved in their communities. Youth meet to plan and implement campaigns that impact both local (city council candidate nights) and statewide issues.
 
6. Enrichment: UTEC provides afternoon recreational and cultural activities for all youth in the local community, ages 15-22. Enrichment serves not only as a hook to get youth in the door, but also a way to retain them in our other program offerings. Youth can participate in a variety of rotating programs to express creativity, engage in athletic fun, and participate in special events.
 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Diversity and Cultural Competence

As demonstrated by our agency’s disproportionately high representation of minority youth, UTEC works to reach youth of all racial and ethnic backgrounds, genders, and sexual identities and is mindful of language appropriateness, cultural sensitivity, and the complexity of youth identifying in various ways – especially those in low-income and minority subpopulations.

Our staff’s diversity, cultural competence and connections to Lowell’s gang and street communities enable UTEC to reach the most disengaged youth. Our staff collectively speak Khmer (Cambodian), Spanish, Portuguese and Vietnamese. They are rarely confronted by language barriers when reaching out to high-risk youth. A number of our staff members are Lowell natives or long-time residents, and some have also been formerly homeless or gang involved. This allows our staff a unique opportunity to relate to youth by understanding where they are in their lives and providing a living example of how to make positive choices and reach success.

Management Expertise

Like many growing agencies, UTEC relied on its Executive Director to manage and evaluate programs, oversee fiscal systems, and plan for future developments during our first decade. As part of our growth as an organization, we have built a strong management team whose members specialize in these functions and whose work is coordinated and supervised by the Executive Director.

UTEC hired its first Director of Evaluation in 2010 as part of our commitment to data collection and performance management.

In early 2013, UTEC created the position of Chief Program Officer to further invest in planning, assessment, and implementation across the program model. This executive role oversees the Director of Evaluation, who now provides staff leadership for data collection and interpretation.

In 2013, UTEC hired its first Innovation Officer to lead the development of Social Enterprises that would (a) provide our youth with meaningful job experiences, and (b) operate as a source of program income to diversify our revenue stream.

A new Director of Development joined UTEC in 2013 to focus on building the individual donor base and increasing corporate support, as part of the overall commitment to diversified revenue. This work is further spurred by a three-year matching gift challenge through Strategic Grant Partners.

In the past, there was not a clear separation between programming, facilities, and logistics, such as youth transportation. In FY13, we hired UTEC’s first Facilities Manager and in FY14 we hired UTEC’s first Chief Operating Officer (COO) to clearly separate facilities, support, and financial functions from program development and implementation.In 2015, we hired a Mattress Warehouse Manager who has significant experience in this field. 


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

UTEC’s goal is to foster the social and economic success of proven-risk young people. To help us accomplish our youth goals, we have identified agency-wide outcome areas that guide all programming and define the “social and economic success” referenced in our mission statement. UTEC tracks youth progress toward:

• Increased Educational Attainment;
• Increased Employability; and
• Reduced Recidivism and Criminal Activity.

Specifically, we expect the following long-term youth outcomes:

Education:
• 55% of target youth will receive their HiSET credential by program completion.

Employment:
• At least 60% of target youth will obtain and maintain employment with no more than 2 job changes and a maximum unemployment period of 45 days within their first year of post-program completion.
• At least 60% of target youth will maintain employment with no more than 1 job change and a maximum unemployment period of 45 days within their second year of post-program completion.

Recidivism:
• No more than 10% of target youth will be arrested (after 3 months enrollment ) while in programming.
• No more than 15% of target youth will be arrested within 2 years post-program completion.

The evaluation plan for UTEC's programmatic work examines the organization's implementation of programming and progress in achieving positive outcomes for youth. We collect a common set of data for all target youth to determine the relationship between UTEC programming and youth outcomes. UTEC staff document all program activity and services provided to youth using Efforts to Outcomes, our agency-wide database software.

The data allows staff to determine not just what knowledge, skills, and competencies that youth are attaining during and after their time at UTEC, but also how these abilities contribute to their success beyond UTEC. Through an analysis of all youth outcomes, UTEC can better understand what programs are and are not contributing to youth well-being and how they are succeeding or failing. Based on this information, UTEC can take steps to make improvements to programming to increase UTEC's rates of success with young people.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

As an agency committed to being a field leader in evaluation and organizational learning, UTEC has been steadily increasing our internal capacity to collect and evaluate data. UTEC began using Efforts To Outcomes (ETO) – our agency-wide database software – in November 2010 and all departments transitioned to ETO in March 2011. The Director of Evaluation works closely with our Chief Program Officer to review data with regard to retention, successful completion, and services offered, among other categories.

UTEC employs a number of indicators to evaluate youth success. Attendance in WFD and GED programming, along with GED test scores, are tracked regularly. Each young person receives a biweekly Performance Review conducted by the staff Program Manager. Performance reviews focus largely on leadership, teamwork, and soft skills, with a general indicator for the youth’s mastery of hard skills that are currently being addressed. Since overall enrollment in Workforce Development can last an average of 18-24 months, tracking a youth’s Performance Review scores can be an insightful indicator for employment-skills progress over a shorter time period.

UTEC also uses our ongoing data review to assess and tweak details of our program operations. For example, in 2014we re-organized our Workforce programming and HiSET educational schedules to ensure that young people are able to attend HiSET preparation on a daily basis to reinforce concepts and complementary learning skills. Similarly, we have adjusted the format for the orientation phase of Workforce Development, known as “Transformational Beginnings,” by providing a longer and more self-contained entry phase for new youth. This longer “on-ramp” to intensive programs is intended to provide greater stability and stronger outcomes performance among cohorts who begin their enrollment this way.

We have also demonstrated success in our past adjustments. For example, for the 2011 cohort, substance abuse was the most common reason for disengaging (15% of youth who disengaged did so due to substance abuse issues), but this reason has been less prevalent in more recent years (only 2% in 2013); UTEC now provides on-site substance abuse counseling services as part of our integrated model.