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Family Nurturing Center of Massachusetts Inc

 200 Bowdoin Street
 Dorchester, MA 02122
[P] (617) 474-1143
[F] (617) 474-1261
www.familynurturing.org
[email protected]
Matt LiPuma
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INCORPORATED: 1999
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 31-1626186

LAST UPDATED: 03/22/2018
Organization DBA Family Nurturing Center
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of the Family Nurturing Center of Massachusetts (FNC) is to work with others to build nurturing communities where children are cherished, families are supported and healthy development is promoted by all. 

Mission Statement

The mission of the Family Nurturing Center of Massachusetts (FNC) is to work with others to build nurturing communities where children are cherished, families are supported and healthy development is promoted by all. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $2,357,656.00
Projected Expense $2,351,712.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community-Based Family Support
  • Nurturing Parenting Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of the Family Nurturing Center of Massachusetts (FNC) is to work with others to build nurturing communities where children are cherished, families are supported and healthy development is promoted by all. 

Background Statement

Founded in 1994, FNC began its work at what is now Boston Medical Center, training hospital staff and families in the Nurturing Philosophy, an evidenced-based model of family support centered on the idea that parenting is learned.  Since 1998, the organization has been incorporated as a non-profit based in Dorchester, though FNC provides services in a several Boston neighborhoods, including Allston-Brighton and Roslindale.

To achieve its mission, FNC provides family support and education programs to strengthen families and prevent child abuse and neglect by building parents’ nurturing skills and knowledge of healthy child development and connecting families to resources and each other.  FNC's two main strategies for supporting families are Nurturing Programs and Family Support Networks.  FNC also leverages its funding and expertise by providing Training and Technical Assistance to spread both strategies and build capacity in other organizations across Boston and Massachusetts. 

Nurturing Parenting Programs are 12-15 week, research-validated, interactive parent support and education programs that involve the whole family.  These free programs build nurturing skills through group lessons and fun activities from a nationally recognized curriculum.  FNC’s Family Support Networks are community-based programs that include Welcome Baby Newborn Outreach Home Visits, Parent-Baby and Parent-Child Playgroups, the Parent-Child Home Program, parenting workshops and education series, a Family Enrichment Site in Dorchester, and Nurturing Programs.  FNC works within each community, visiting families in their homes and using programming space at schools, libraries, and community centers provided in-kind by partners. 

FNC’s target population is families at-risk by virtue of their low income, social isolation, or involvement with the Department of Children and Families (DCF), but referrals are accepted for any family.  Parents participating in Nurturing Programs show significant gains in empathy and appropriate expectations for their children and are more likely to choose alternatives to corporal punishment.  Families who become involved in FNC’s Family Engagement and Support programs also improve parenting skills, read more to their infants, make gains in school-readiness, feel more comfortable in their roles as parents, and connect to other parents for mutual support and to community services.  FNC serves nearly 1400 families per year - over 3000 parents and children.


Impact Statement

Family Nurturing Center Accomplishments FY18

1. Secured Lead Agency designation from Department of Early Education and Care for the Coordinated Family and Community Engagement grant. This $807,000 annual contract ensures that City of Boston families with children birth to 8 have the supports they need to provide a healthy, nurturing home environments for their children.

2. Passed the $2 million mark in our Changing Children’s Chances capital campaign for a Family and Training Center in the Bowdoin-Geneva neighborhood of Dorchester. Received a Letter of Intent for New Market Tax credits from the Massachusetts Housing and Investment Corporation (MHIC) and received financing from Eastern Bank. All of this has us on target for starting construction of new building in the spring of 2018.

3. Received a $100K for 100 Grant from the Cummings Foundation and a large grant from the Nordblom Family Foundation for our community-based Family Support Networks.

4. Worked with the National Parent-Child Home Program as one of the pilot sites to bring the Parent-Child Home Program into family childcare sites.

5. Established a new partnership with Fairmount Housing in Hyde Park for programming space for families in the development, which expands our Roslindale/Hyde Park Family Support Network.

Family Nurturing Center Goals FY18, FY19

1. Complete capital campaign fundraising before opening the Family and Training Center in June, 2019. Raise enough funds to eliminate the need for a mortgage.

2. Complete FNC’s 2019-2024 Strategic Plan, engaging staff, board, families, partners, and other stakeholders in the process.

3. Establish new and strengthen existing partnerships to reach more expectant parents and parents with children ages 0-3 to build parents' skills as their child's first teacher.

4. Increase individual giving by at least 20% - through new donor acquisition and deeper engagement of current donors.


Needs Statement

  • Complete rehabilitation of FNC Dorchester offices to include improved, accessible space for meetings, trainings, and Nurturing Programs. Building Committee is working on cost estimate.
  • Board growth to include 3-5 new members with areas of expertise in marketing, public relations, fundraising, and development.
  • Deepening and expansion of community-based family support work - ensuring that work in each of FNC's target neighborhoods has the necessary physical space, staff, and funding to implement all programs.
  • Growth of Training Team to manage continued expansion of Nurturing Programs and NP Training and Technical Assistance across Massachusetts.
  • Clear marketing strategy to increase visibility, name recognition, and reach for the purposes of obtaining the funding to increase numbers of families served.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Hyde Park
STATEWIDE
City of Boston- Roxbury
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Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Services
  2. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Community-Based Family Support

FNC provides Community-Based Family Support in Boston neighborhoods, with a focus in Dorchester, Roslindale, and Allston-Brighton. We create neighborhood networks of support for families with the following goals:
  1. Build parents' skills as nurturers and as their child's first teacher
  2. Build children's social and emotional, early literacy, and other school readiness skills
  3. Connect families to resources and each other

FNC's family support programs in each community include Welcome Baby Home visiting for families with newborns, the Parent-Child Home Program (PCHP - a national home-visiting program that FNC coordinates for Boston citywide), Parent-Baby and Parent-Child Playgroups, parent workshops and education series, family events, and ongoing support and advocacy.

Budget  $975,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Families
Program Short-Term Success  short term success
Program Long-Term Success  Theory of change
Program Success Monitored By 
Welcome Baby:  Phone surveys are completed within 1 and 4 months following a home visit.  We survey three times per year, reaching 25-33% of families visited.  Surveys assess what changes occurred as a result of the visit, how often parents are reading to their child, and how many connections to resources a family has made as a result.
Parent-Child Home Program: This 23-week home-visiting program measures changes in children's behavior using the Child Behavior Traits (CBT) measure and improvements in Parent-Child interaction using the Parent and Child Together (PACT) measure.
Parent-Child Playgroups: FNC administers written surveys that ask for parents’ perceptions of their child’s behavior at the beginning of the playgroup and at the end, what the parents believed their child learned through participation in the playgroup and what parents learned. In addition, we ask what the parents learned about resources and whether they met new friends at the playgroup.   
Examples of Program Success 
In FY12, we surveyed 85 Welcome Baby visit recipients by phone and learned that as result of the visit 56 families report reading more often to their children. During the Welcome Baby visit, 40 participants reported reading to their baby every day, whereas at the time of the survey, the number increased to 65.
 
In the PCHP in FY12, we saw  increases in overall scores on the Child Behavior Traits measure, particularly in Task Orientation (Attention to Task), Emotional Stability, and Cognitive Abilities. Increases in the Parent and Child Together measure have been in Parent Affection and Communication.
 
In Parent-Child Playgroups, Parents reported that their child improved in his/her ability to participate in the playgroup in terms of a) following the playgroup leader’s directions, b) easily transitioning from one activity to another, and c) feeling comfortable trying new things.   

Nurturing Parenting Program

Nurturing Parenting Programs are 12-15 week, research-validated, interactive parent support and education programs that involve the whole family.  These free programs build nurturing skills through group lessons and fun activities from a nationally recognized curriculum.  FNC’s target population is families at-risk by virtue of their low income, social isolation, or involvement with the Department of Children and Families (DCF), but referrals are accepted for any family.  Parents participating in Nurturing Programs show significant gains in empathy and appropriate expectations for their children and are more likely to choose alternatives to corporal punishment. Costs vary depending on size of program and number of participants.  Programs use trained facilitators to run age appropriate groups (parent group, teens, 9-12, 6-9 etc).  All families come together at key points in the evening for Family Nurturing Time.  Fun activities build family cohesion.
Budget  15,000-32,000
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Families At-Risk Populations Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
Over the course of 12-15 week 2.5 hour sessions parents make significant gains in pre-post reliable testing that assess attitudes and practices that are associated with risk of abuse and neglect.  We see increases in most of the constructs measured: empathy, reduced use of corporal punishment, power and independence, age appropriate parental expectations, and role reversal.  More importantly, parent surveys tell us these programs have significant impact on the quality of the parent/child relationship and parents develop deep connections to each other and to other resources. (concrete supports, assistance with housing etc.)
Program Long-Term Success 
Research is very clear that nurturing parenting has significant impact on brain development and later child outcomes.  When caretakers develop nurturing skills and attitudes they are more likely to contribute to their child's healthy development.  Recent studies have demonstrated that families involved with the state care and protection agency who have gone through nurturing parenting programs have lower recidivism rates.  Program elements support longer term improved family relationships
Program Success Monitored By 
Parents are administered  the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory-2 at the beginning of their participation in the program.  This is a reliable assessment tool that measures risk of abuse/neglect.  Program staff reveiw the results and use the information that help them plan curriculum relevant to the needs of the group participants. For expample, if the group is low on Empathy the team will focus the curriculm on lessons designed to impact that construct.  The curriculum is designed to impact the constructs discussed above. 
At the end of the program the AAPI_2 post survey is distributed and scored.
Program staff also distribute surveys at  the last session to understand what parents themselves learned from the program.
Examples of Program Success 
Details to be added for FY12

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Matthew LiPuma
CEO Term Start Jan 2005
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Matthew LiPuma, LICSW- Executive Director- Family Nurturing Center of Massachusetts

 Matt is the Executive Director of Family Nurturing Center of Massachusetts (FNC), a Dorchester based non-profit whose mission is to “work with others to create nurturing communities where children are cherished, families are supported and healthy human development is promoted by all”. FNC is best known for its innovative family support programming. It is the statewide training and technical assistance center for Nurturing Parenting Programs and coordinates a network of supports for families with young children in Allston-Brighton (Allston-Brighton Family Network). 

For nearly 40 years, Matt has supported Boston area children and their families through the provision, management and development of innovative mental health and social service programs. He is a voting member and Secretary of the Governing Council of the Boston Community Partnerships Council for Children, serves on the the Countdown to Kindergarten Steering Committee and is Chair of the Full Service Schools Roundtable Steering Committee. Matt was one of sixty Boston Action Team Planning Members who, along with over 40 parents, developed a school readiness road map for the city of Boston called Thrive in Five: Boston’s Promise to its Children.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Elise DeWinter Eckelkamp Aug 2000 Jan 2005
Ms Sharon Shay-Workman Jan 1994 June 2001

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
William L. Boyan Award for Excellence in Community Health Boston Children's Hospital 2014
Mayor's Award for Excellence in Children's Health Mayor's Office - City of Boston 2006

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 17
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 220
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 8
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): 3 - 1 Cape Verdean, 2 Bi-racial
Gender Female: 15
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

Computer Equipment and Software
Disability Insurance
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Professional Liability
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Taran Grigsby
Board Chair Company Affiliation National Grid
Board Chair Term Nov 2017 - Oct 2019
Board Co-Chair Wallace
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Estefania Alves Boston International High School / Newcomers Academy --
Mr. Shergul Arshad DraftKings --
Mr. Robert Blake CFA BNY Mellon Voting
Ms. Janet Boguslaw Ph.D Brandeis University Voting
Ms. Laura Conway Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Voting
Mr. Taran Grigsby Boston Realty Advisors Voting
Ms. Susan Keller Harvard University Voting
Ms. Phyllis Menken Esq. Attorney, private --
Mr. Daniel Nakamoto Mental Health Association of Greater Lowell Voting
Ms. Deirdre Pierce Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Jeri Robinson Boston Children's Museum Voting
Ms. Ronda Rockett MD Family Physician - on leave Voting
Mr. Kenneth Willis Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston Voting
Ms. Sharon Shay Workman Ph.D FNC Founder, retired Exofficio

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 2 - Cape Verdean, Bi-Racial
Gender Female: 9
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Building
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Operations
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $2,104,717 $1,980,965 $2,093,710
Total Expenses $1,974,448 $1,816,605 $2,150,763

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$465,735 $520,880 $390,469
Government Contributions $1,044,838 $964,799 $1,249,512
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,044,838 $964,799 $1,249,512
Individual Contributions $370,322 $248,564 $215,299
Indirect Public Support $37,171 $38,430 --
Earned Revenue $77,082 $112,904 $89,438
Investment Income, Net of Losses $1,201 $954 $1,303
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $107,754 $94,225 $145,378
Other $614 $209 $2,311

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $1,539,613 $1,420,122 $1,735,730
Administration Expense $201,988 $195,201 $241,773
Fundraising Expense $232,847 $201,282 $173,260
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.07 1.09 0.97
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 78% 81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 11% 9%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $1,763,591 $1,529,233 $1,417,253
Current Assets $866,138 $818,834 $747,168
Long-Term Liabilities $513,754 $390,424 $367,992
Current Liabilities $123,826 $143,067 $217,879
Total Net Assets $1,126,011 $995,742 $831,382

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose

FNC will add two stories and renovate our 5,400 square foot building to create a model 12,800 square foot Family and Training Center. The design features include an indoor play space for families with young children; flexible meeting spaces for small groups/classes (10-15 people) and large groups (50-70) for Nurturing Parenting Programs, trainings, and community meetings; and open office space promoting collaborative and integrated service delivery.

The expanded building will be a magnet for neighborhood families and a busy hub for FNC's work in Bowdoin-Geneva, Boston, and Massachusetts. It will allow us to deepen our impact in the neighborhood, increase by 50% the number of families we serve in the city, and expand Nurturing Programs in the Commonwealth.

This is a $6.3 million project. We will raise $3 million through the Changing Children’s Chances capital campaign, secure $1.8 million in New Market Tax Credits, and acquire a $1.5 million mortgage.

 
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates June 2014 - June 2019
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $2,043,066.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 6.99 5.72 3.43

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 29% 26% 26%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Our FY18 budget is significantly larger this year due to our role as Lead Agency for the Boston Coordinated Family and Community Engagement grant, noted above in achievements. In the spring of 2017, FNC submitted an application to be the new Lead Agency for the $807,000 Department of Early Education and Care (DEEC) contract for the city of Boston. This role was formerly held by Boston Public Schools. FNC was chosen by the Boston Family Engagement Network (BFEN) Council in June and approved by DEEC over the summer. FNC is now responsible for collecting billing and reports from and disbursing state grant funds to other community partners serving families with young children.
 
In FY17, recognizing the efforts needed to support both operations and a capital campaign, Family Nurturing Center invested in administrative infrastructure, hired a Director of Programs, and increased restricted and unrestricted fundraising goals. The year before, we added a Development Assistant to the Development team. The increase in expenses and a revenue shortfall resulted in a net deficit in operations of $56,820 - of which, $23,000 was depreciation (a non-cash item). This was the first operating deficit since our incorporation. Total operations revenue was $1,917,628, and operations expenses were $1,974,448. For FY18, we have worked with the board to ensure our revenue estimates are more conservative and have also been working with staff to review expenses throughout the year.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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