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Eliot School Parent Council

 16 Charter Street
 Boston, MA 02113
[P] (617) 635-8545
[F] --
www.eliotk8school.org
[email protected]
Traci Griffith
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 2010
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 32-0268160

LAST UPDATED: 09/21/2017
Organization DBA Eliot K-8 Innovation School
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Eliot K-8 Innovation School's mission is to provide a well-rounded education that helps every student not only achieve academic excellence, but build character, self-confidence, leadership and solid values, becoming positive contributors to their communities. 
 
Eliot School Family Council (ESFC) consists of parents and guardians of students of the Eliot School as well as community partners, teachers, and school administrators. The ESFC advocates for the students of the school and takes a leadership role in promoting family engagement and fosters an environment of understanding and common purpose among parents and teachers.

Mission Statement

The Eliot K-8 Innovation School's mission is to provide a well-rounded education that helps every student not only achieve academic excellence, but build character, self-confidence, leadership and solid values, becoming positive contributors to their communities. 
 
Eliot School Family Council (ESFC) consists of parents and guardians of students of the Eliot School as well as community partners, teachers, and school administrators. The ESFC advocates for the students of the school and takes a leadership role in promoting family engagement and fosters an environment of understanding and common purpose among parents and teachers.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $350,000.00
Projected Expense $348,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Enriching the Day for All Students

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Eliot K-8 Innovation School's mission is to provide a well-rounded education that helps every student not only achieve academic excellence, but build character, self-confidence, leadership and solid values, becoming positive contributors to their communities. 
 
Eliot School Family Council (ESFC) consists of parents and guardians of students of the Eliot School as well as community partners, teachers, and school administrators. The ESFC advocates for the students of the school and takes a leadership role in promoting family engagement and fosters an environment of understanding and common purpose among parents and teachers.

Background Statement

Situated in Boston’s historic North End, the Eliot K-8 Innovation School is part of the Boston Public Schools system and serves over 500 students across the city’s neighborhoods.  The Eliot is a unique learning environment where educators, administrators, families and the community collaborate to create a culture of high achievement.  At the Eliot, diversity is embraced and celebrated, and each individual is nurtured and encouraged to maximize his or her potential.

In 2007, the Eliot was a low-performing school being considered for closure.  However, the hiring of new principal Traci Walker Griffith with her holistic approach - serving children academically, socially, and emotionally - and the help of a committed teaching staff, dedicated student families and an engaged community, ushered in a transformation that has produced one of Boston’s BEST public schools, with a waitlist larger than its enrollment. 

The success of the Eliot drove administrators, families, and the community to campaign for its expansion in January 2011.  City leaders took notice and acquired a nearby building to facilitate its growth.  In the fall of 2012, some of the Eliot’s Middle School classes were moved into the newly-acquired building, which created space for a new Kindergarten class, the first in a new strand of classes to be added each year until its completion with grade eight.

During its turnaround phase, the Eliot made many changes to its instruction and culture to advance the academic proficiency of all of its students.  New partnerships were formed and programs created to eliminate some of the hurdles that often make it difficult for schools to help students improve their performance.  One such program assists teachers and families in addressing behavioral and emotional issues that are barriers to a child’s academic success.  Another element differentiating the Eliot’s curriculum is the practice of inclusion, where all levels of learners thrive in the same classroom. These changes along with ongoing evaluation of teaching methods and assessment strategies began to improve academic outcomes for all Eliot students. 

In early 2011, the Eliot applied to the school district to change its classification to an innovation school.  As an innovation school, the Eliot to implement further changes to its curriculum, staffing, teaching methods and assessment strategies, yet still remain a Boston Public School. The city granted approval for the status change in September 2012.

Impact Statement

Accomplishments:

- In 2012, the Eliot was classified as a Boston Innovation School, giving us increased flexibility with our curriculum, staffing, and budgeting.

- As of the 2013-14 school year, 84% of students at the Eliot are achieving Advanced/Proficient scores on the English/Language Arts Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment Systems (MCAS), compared to 56% of students district-wide achieving these scores. On the Math MCAS, 89% of Eliot students scored proficient or advanced, compared to 49% district-wide. The Eliot has since moved to PARCC and does not have publicly released scores to share.

- As our scores have increased, so has the size of our school. We are currently serving 525 students, more than tripling in size since our new principal took over in 2007. We have a waitlist larger than our student body, and the city has purchased additional space for our students in recognition of our academic excellence and the high demand for seats at the school.

- The Eliot partners with dozens of organizations throughout the city to help support our students emotionally and socially as well as academically. We have also integrated art, theater, and physical education into our curriculum.

Goals:

- Continued academic growth and success: We strive for 100% of students to achieve Advanced/Proficient scores on the PARCC and to show growth from one year to the next.

- Complete construction of our new building and move students into a state-of-the-art learning facility.

- Support all students socially and emotionally by responding directly to the individual needs of every student. Simultaneously expand our arts and enrichment programs throughout the school by extending learning time for all students.


Needs Statement

-Arts Education: Through paid partnerships, the Eliot is able to provide arts opportunities to all students. Students in various grades take visual art, theater, music, bookbinding, and woodworking. These programs are largely funded through grants and individual giving.

- Robotics & STEM: We hope to integrate technology into the student curriculum and to create increased opportunities for students to learn science and engineering through hands-on projects in our already successful robotics program. The total cost of expanding our robotics program to reach all students is $50,000 for capital purchases and training.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
As a Boston Public School, students are assigned to the Eliot using a computer algorithm that considers proximity, school choice rankings and many other factors when assigning schools. As a result, we have little say in our school demographics, which at times vary dramatically from year to year. Mainly, our families come from the North End, Charlestown, and East Boston.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Elementary & Secondary Schools
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Enriching the Day for All Students

Students are offered a number of enrichment opportunities every week as part of the school curriculum.

- Art: The Eliot offers hands-on art classes to all students teaching them to sketch, water-color, paint, etc.

- Theater: Younger students focus on movement and space while older students focus on a single production. Theater is offered as a free after school program and we hope to offer Saturday rehearsals as well.

- Italian: Situated in the North End, our school is steeped in Italian culture. All students have at least one Italian class each week; some have a second.

- Physical Education: The physical, mental, and academic benefits to daily exercise are clear. All students have recess every day and physical education once each week.

- Robotics:  Students in grades 3-8 receive weekly robotics classes where they build and program increasingly complex robots. Students in all grades also have a project-based robotics cycle during which they have a daily robotics class for three weeks.

- Woodworking & Bookbinding: In collaboration with the North Bennett Street School, we offer upper school students woodworking or bookbinding classes as part of weekly lessons.

Budget  $300,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

We measure short term success based on family satisfaction with the school’s programming and on the number of students who pursue or participate in outside of school programs reflective of the work they are doing in school. At the Upper School, each enrichment program is measured at the end of a three week cycle to ensure students are meeting specific program goals. Families are surveyed annually to share feedback on the school’s programming as well as requests for new enrichment opportunities.

Program Long-Term Success  Our enrichment programs help build the culture of the Eliot, sustaining an environment of high expectations and nurturing students to help them reach those goals. As we consider extending the school day, it becomes all the more important to continue to offer enrichment opportunities for all of our students. Physical health, the arts, and any opportunity for hands-on learning help keep students engaged throughout the school day. Our students are excited to come to school, as displayed by our 98% attendance and 0% suspension rates (compared to district averages of 92% and 4% respectively).

 

Our programmatic offerings continue to make the Eliot one of the most sought after schools in Boston, with a wait-list larger than enrollment. Our ultimate success is measured by how engaged our students are, both in their enrichment classes, but also in their other classes throughout the day.

Program Success Monitored By  We are deeply committed to monitoring our successes and opportunities for improvement within the school. The principal and assistant principal are in every classroom every day, checking up on work objectives, structure, and student learning. In addition, we bring in external experts to regularly assess the school and suggest opportunities for improvement. We partner with the Lynch Leadership Academy (Principal Traci Griffith was a Lynch Leadership Fellow before becoming a principal) who regularly visit the school and offer feedback using a school rubric review.

 

Our teachers also meet in groups on a regular basis to discuss what programs are successful and where their students need more help. We hold ourselves to high standards set both internally to the school, but checked by external specialists in order to make sure we are offering our students the best possible learning environment.

Examples of Program Success 

Expanded access to Italian: we now employ two full time Italian teachers ensuring that all students receive Italian instruction weekly and many, twice a week.

The Eliot School theater program launched a collaboration with Boston Conservatory in which students receive individual or small group mentorship from visiting student artists from Boston Conservatory. The number of students participating in after-school theater and theater tech has increased year over year.

The Eliot launched its robotics program in 2014-15, with an extensive Upper School robotics lab and a limited Lower School robotics Lab. Over 50 Eliot students participated in the Boston Public Schools’ robotics Olympics in May 2015 and 13 earned medals (out of 24 medal spots available to the eight participating schools). Kindergarten students were given a challenge which all Eliot School participants completed.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Traci Griffith
CEO Term Start Apr 2007
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Traci Walker Griffith has served as Principal of the Eliot since spring 2007. She also served as Assistant Principal of the Tobin K-8 School for one year and interned at the Mather Elementary School as a Boston Principal Fellow. Ms. Griffith's teaching career in the Boston Public Schools began in 1992 at the Trotter Elementary School, where she also served as Assistant Principal for one year before becoming a Boston Principal Fellow. In 2004, Ms. Griffith won a Boston Teacher of The Year Award. She has also served as a Panel Review member for the state Department of Education. Ms. Griffith holds a Bachelor's Degree in Education from Plymouth State College, a Master's Degree in Education from Lesley College, and a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies from the University of Massachusetts-Boston.
Co-CEO Ms Lydia Torres
Co-CEO Term Start Aug 2007
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience   Ms. Lydia Torres has served as Assistant Principal at the Eliot since summer 2007. Previously, she spent two years as the English Language Arts Program for Middle and High Schools and one year as a Literacy Coach. Ms. Torres received her Bachelor's in Elementary Education and Teaching from Lesley University and her Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies at Cambridge College.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 50
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 11
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 5
Caucasian: 27
Hispanic/Latino: 6
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 45
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms Katie Everett
Board Chair Company Affiliation The Lynch Foundation
Board Chair Term Sept 2012 -
Board Co-Chair Mr Israel Ruiz
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation MIT
Board Co-Chair Term Sept 2015 -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Janes Buelto North End/Waterfront Health Center Voting
Rich Demerle Michienzie & Sawin LLC, Attorneys at Law Voting
Stacey Elwood Head Harvard University Voting
Emily Galindo Teacher, Eliot School Voting
Traci Griffith Principal, Eliot School Voting
Lynn Johnson Teacher, Eliot School Voting
Jorge Mendoza Monicas Restaurants Voting
Sean Murphy Teacher, Eliot School Voting
Peta-Gaye Prinn Other Voting
Danielle Simonini Teacher, Eliot School Voting
Lydia Torres Assistant Principal, Eliot School --
Mary Wright North End/Waterfront Health Center Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 19
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 63
Hispanic/Latino: 19
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 69
Male: 31
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 70%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 11%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive
  • Personnel
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $350,000.00
Projected Expense $348,000.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Financial Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $232,397 $252,355 $125,478
Total Expenses $197,276 $152,942 $81,438

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$60,305 -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $109,514 $238,249 $104,076
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- $1,786
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $62,578 $17,790 $19,616
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $-3,685 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $197,276 $152,942 $80,653
Administration Expense -- -- $785
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.18 1.65 1.54
Program Expense/Total Expenses 100% 100% 99%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $303,410 $262,340 $162,928
Current Assets $303,410 $262,340 $162,928
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $12,251 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $291,159 $262,340 $162,928

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 24.77 -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As a Boston Public School, more than 90% of our budget comes from federal, state, and city grants given to all public schools. Funds that come from other sources are used for a variety of programs and supplies, including helping to fund our arts programs, language program, and physical education and wellness. We also partner with a wide variety of organizations that provide services to our school for free in order to help bolster students’ social and emotional health.

We use almost our entire budget from the funds we are entitled to as a public school for the one thing students need the most: high-quality teachers. As a result, we rely on external funding for all additional programs we bring into the school. This includes curriculum development, supplies for classrooms, and arts and stem programs for all of our students.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

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1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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