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Springfield Rescue Mission, Inc.

 PO Box 9045, 10 Mill Street
 Springfield, MA 01102
[P] (413) 732-0808 x 114
[F] (413) 732-5512
hope4springfield.org
info@hope4springfield.org
Ronald Willoughby
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INCORPORATED: 1892
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 52-1047790

LAST UPDATED: 03/01/2017
Organization DBA SRM (Springfield Rescue Mission)
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The goal of the Springfield Rescue Mission (SRM) is to meet the physical and spiritual needs of the hungry, homeless, addicted, and poor by introducing them to Christ and helping them to apply the word of God to every area of their lives.

Mission Statement

The goal of the Springfield Rescue Mission (SRM) is to meet the physical and spiritual needs of the hungry, homeless, addicted, and poor by introducing them to Christ and helping them to apply the word of God to every area of their lives.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year June 01, 2015 to May 31, 2016
Projected Income $2,409,250.00
Projected Expense $2,402,623.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Men's Emergency Shelter Program
  • Men's New Life Program
  • Men's Transitional Living Program
  • Operation Sonshine
  • Public Breakfast

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The goal of the Springfield Rescue Mission (SRM) is to meet the physical and spiritual needs of the hungry, homeless, addicted, and poor by introducing them to Christ and helping them to apply the word of God to every area of their lives.

Background Statement

Established in 1892 under the leadership of Julius Cummings, a former Salvation Army Captain, the Springfield Rescue Mission is one of the oldest human service agencies in Greater Springfield, Massachusetts. In its early years, SRM focused on providing food, clothing and shelter to men living on the streets and transients. In 1951, a newly recruited board comprised of seven local businessmen re-chartered the Springfield Rescue Mission and set a new vision with strategic objectives to strengthen the organization’s board governance policies, leadership and accountability while enhancing programs and services to the poor and homeless.
 
In 1962, the Springfield Rescue Mission purchased the former YWCA building at 19 Bliss Street in downtown Springfield to provide more space for expanding programs to meet the needs of the growing homeless population and for offices to accommodate administrative and program staff. In 1974, SRM became a member of the Association of Gospel Rescue Missions, a national association of over 300 rescue missions.
 

The Springfield Rescue Mission has since undergone several renovation and expansion projects and now operates three facilities providing emergency shelter, transitional housing, long-term rehabilitation and other programs to poor and homeless men:

  1. 148 Taylor Street houses the Men’s Emergency Shelter Program and the Men’s Transitional Living Program.
  2. 19 Bliss Street is the location for SRM’s Men’s Rehabilitation New Life Program.
  3. 15 Bliss Street houses SRM’s Give-Away Center.

The Mission offers a wide range of services to meet the needs of the homeless men, women and children in the area, and, more importantly, our programs help individuals take meaningful steps toward becoming responsible and productive members of the community.

The Springfield Rescue Mission currently employs 15 full-time staff and 7 part-time staff. Over 950 current volunteers serve in various areas at the Mission providing 28,622 hours of volunteer service in 2014.
 
The Springfield Rescue Mission does not discriminate based on race, creed, ethnicity or gender (although certain programs are gender-specific). The population served at SRM is as follows: 85% male, 15% female; 85% are ages 25-55, 10% are ages 56 and up, and 5% are ages 0-24; 37% Hispanic, 35% Caucasian, 27% African-American and 1% Asian or Multi-ethnicity.

Impact Statement

Serving the homeless and disadvantaged in Springfield and the Pioneer Valley since 1892!

The Springfield Rescue Mission (SRM) passionately works at reducing hunger, homelessness and despair in an effort to transform lives and impact the community. Each day, SRM’s staff and volunteers work selflessly and compassionately to inspire hope in those less fortunate and to carry out SRM’s effective programs which meets the needs of thousands of men, women and children. Every time we help an individual put hunger and/or homelessness behind them we are strengthening communities.

We ask you to join us in celebrating the goals achieved by the homeless men participating in our Christ-centered programs last year:

  • 155 homeless men secured employment;
  • 82 homeless men obtained affordable housing; and,
  •   6 formerly homeless men completed college/vocational training.
In 2014, the Springfield Rescue Mission met the basic needs of over 7,000 low-income and homeless men, women and children. The services listed below are just a few of the hands-on assistance we provided to those in need:
  • 87,491 nutritious meals
  • 20,214 shelter beds
  • 123,699 pounds of clothing items

In FY2015/2016, SRM expects the need for basic services to continue to increase as evidenced by economic and employment trends over the past few years. Thus, SRM expects to provide over 100,000 meals, 20,000 shelter beds (men only,) and 80,000 items of clothing, all free of charge, to homeless and disadvantaged men, women and children.

Over the course of the year, our Men’s Emergency Shelter Program expects to assist up to 800 homeless men; the Men’s New Life Rehabilitation Program will serve an estimated 100 homeless men requiring our case management services to achieve practical life skills as well as educational, job training and employment goals. SRM’s Men’s Transitional Living Program will help transition approximately 15 men back into the community ready to live productive lives.


Needs Statement

Our Board of Directors and staff appreciate the generosity and loyalty of our donors from the smallest gift to the largest-every amount counts. We would like to ask our donors to give serious consideration to how you could help in some extra way with the needs listed below. Your donation today will help us meet these goals.
 
1. General Operating Funds
 
Summer operations of the Men’s Emergency Shelter. A lack of contributions during the summer may force closure of our Emergency Shelter. To keep the Men’s Emergency Shelter open during the summer, an additional $90,000 over our current organizational budget is needed.
 
 
2. Capital Projects – $579, Needed for Critical Items to Furnish our new facility at 10 Mill Street, Springfield.  https://www.razoo.com/story/Springfield-Rescue-Mission-Relocation-Fundraiser

CEO Statement

At the Springfield Rescue Mission we are privileged to serve the physical and spiritual needs of the hungry, homeless, addicted and poor in our community. We are grateful for the support of so many donors and volunteers, and being able to operate without asking for direct government funding. And, we are proud of a 123 year history of providing services to the thousands upon thousands who have been helped.

Year after year we see increased demand for the programs we offer. Over the past 28 year of my service at SRM, I have seen the implementation of our residential rehabilitation program called “Men’s New Life Program” and soon after our mobile feeding program called “Operation SONshine”. In 1989 we opened our Clothing and Give-Away Center, 1990 began a Prison Ministry and Detox Bible Study; in 1995 added our Learning Center to the Rehabilitation curriculum, 1997 opened our Emergency Shelter at 148 Taylor Street, and 2002 began our Transitional Living Program.


To sustain SRM’s 120-year legacy of helping homeless individuals achieve a better life, the Springfield Rescue Mission is committed to preserving, maintaining and improving its facilities and equipment in order to provide a safe, efficiently-run environment in which guests can receive services from caring, professional staff.
 
I also foresee an immediate need for increased and additional services for the men, women and children seeking assistance from SRM, especially in addressing food insecurity among the populace. A larger facility is required to expand the space for our programs which will accommodate the increasing need for critical services to poor and homeless men, women and children. We are actively searching for a building to meet this community and a few opportunities are under consideration.
 
 The estimated costs for the Capital Project for Mill Street have been determined by skilled architects and businessmen.
 
I wish to ask you for your prayers for our leadership as we search for a building to expand our services for women and families in need in our communities.

Board Chair Statement

I, Robert Blakeslee, serve as the Chairman on an all-volunteer Board of Directors and it is a great privilege as we perform our governance duties for the Springfield Rescue Mission. The Board is grateful to be able to help support and guide an organization that is providing such valuable leadership and services to the hungry, homeless, addicted and poor in the Greater Springfield MA and Northern CT areas.

We see an increasing need for programs and services to men, woman and children. We are searching for a building that will meet these needs for decades into the future.


Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
SRM welcomes all who come to our door in need - we refer to them as our guests. Many travel to Springfield, MA looking for better opportunities or because organizations outside of our immediate service area refer individuals to us. Therefore, our guests represent a large geographic area with the communities of Hampden County and the Pioneer Valley, as well as, communities throughout MA and Northern CT areas, with the majority from the Greater Springfield Metro area.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Homeless Services/Centers
  2. Human Services - Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)
  3. Housing, Shelter - Homeless Shelters

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Men's Emergency Shelter Program

The Men’s Emergency Shelter Program is conducted in SRM’s facility at 148 Taylor Street. Located on the facility’s first floor, the Men’s Emergency Shelter Program has a bed capacity to serve 43 men each night. The purpose of the Emergency Shelter Program is to meet the basic needs of homeless men while offering emotional support, encouragement and an opportunity to change their circumstances. Many of the men are experiencing homelessness for the first time and may be homeless due to the slow economic recovery characterized by a higher unemployment rate in the Springfield area (than the State unemployment rate); and ongoing job layoffs, etc.

An intake process is in place requiring each man to register each night of their stay and provide identification and an emergency contact, if available. The intake process involves an assessment by program staff to help determine which services an individual needs beyond basic services. Each night, the men receive a clean bed, hygiene items, a shower and a change of clothes, if needed. They also receive a nutritious evening meal and breakfast each morning. Currently, the Men’s Emergency Shelter is designed for men, 18 years and older.

Budget  $1,172,449.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Emergency Assistance
Population Served Males Homeless
Program Short-Term Success 
In one month, 93 different Emergency Shelter guests were served. 40 have undertaken a job search. 20 have obtained a job. 7 have obtained housing. 2 have transferred to a long-term rehabilitation program.
Program Long-Term Success 
Goals for the next year:
-  Over 375 homeless men will reside in the Emergency Shelter and be given the opportunity to take a significant steptoward independence and away from the life they lived on the streets. 

-  60% of the men in SRM's Emergency Shelter willseek assistance from SRM staff for supportive services such as job-searchassistance.

 -  225 men will secure employment

 -  90 men will move into independent housingarrangements.

Program Success Monitored By 
The Emergency Shelter Program is monitored daily with intake sheets, tracking names, previous address, intake condition, intake time, etc.  Individuals are monitored for progress and achievements such as obtaining a job, housing or enrolling in long term rehabilitation.
Examples of Program Success 
Annual Outcomes May 2011-June 2012

MassachusettsIdentification Card Obtained –12

Learned How to Complete a Job Application Properly -5

Learned How to Go Through a Job Interview Effectively –5

Job Search Undertaken -173

Job Obtained –158

Housing Obtained -5

Transferred from ESP to NLP -11

                                                                                                      
               

Men's New Life Program

The Men’s New Life Program (NLP) is a one year rehabilitation program for men who are homeless, many of whom struggle with an addiction and low-income and homeless men who do not struggle with addiction but who are in need of spiritual, vocational, educational and employment assistance. NLP provides substance-abuse rehabilitation services to individuals in a supportive environment so they may develop and implement short and long-range plans toward a sober and productive life.
 
Program participants receive case management from SRM’s program chaplains. Weekly classes are offered on topics including work ethic, life skills, job searches, resume development, interview skills, continuing education and personal finance management. The New Life Program participants are required to enroll in SRM’s Learning Center, which offers computer-based academic achievement programs that help men improve their reading, math and vocabulary grade levels and prepare them for their GED test, if needed.

Budget  $1,122,337.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Case Management
Population Served Homeless Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers Males
Program Short-Term Success 

Goals for the Men’s New Life Program during 2013-2014 are as follow:

· 98% of program participants will attend at least two classes that provide addiction recovery job readiness, skills training and/or financial literacy assistance

· 90% of program participants will achieve at least three months of sobriety

· 100% will receive academic assistance to raise their education grade level

· 98% will secure employment after graduating from the program

· 98% will return to their family and/or obtain affordable housing after graduating from the program

· 25% will transition from NLP to the Men’s Transitional Living Program.

Program Long-Term Success 

Men who graduate from the NLP are eligible to participate in SRM’s Men’s Transitional Living Program for an additional 12 months. The Men’s Transitional Living Program is designed to meet basic needs as well as provide guests with free housing in a controlled environment while allowing participants to work on their next phase of rehabilitation. The Men’s Transitional Living Program also provides case management; counseling; budget training and accountability sessions; and assistance with education, job training, and career planning and job placement.

 

Program Success Monitored By 

The Men’s New Life Program participants meet weekly with a program case manager to discuss goals, study assignments and work duties. Each case manager documents the participant’s progress through each of the three phases. Additionally, SRM’s Executive Director/CEO, Ronald Willoughby, receives monthly reports from case managers, and any recommended adjustments or improvements are discussed to maximize the program outcomes for each participant.

In the final phase of NLP, participants focus on securing employment and housing as well as taking personal responsibility for each area of their life. SRM case managers monitor how participants put to use what they learned while enrolled in the program (their resourcefulness, accountability, personal responsibility of health and finances, etc.). Case managers meet with participants as needed to guide and encourage their progress through graduation from the program while documenting their achievements, improvements and set-backs. A graduation ceremony is held annually to recognize and honor NLP participants who successfully complete the requirements of the program and are ready to transition back into the community as productive citizens.

Examples of Program Success 

“I was wasting my life,” Russell admits. A drinker since age nine, Russell watched helplessly as his addiction robbed him of his family, his self-worth, even his joy in living. Throughout his year in the Men’s New Life Program, Russell learned, “Change comes in your heart, not just in your head.” The New Life Program is a time for emotional healing, spiritual renewal and building a strong character to succeed in life.

Following his graduation from the New Life Program, Russell enrolled in SRM’s Men’s Transitional Living Program. During his participation in this program, Russell stated, “It’s (the Transitional Living Program) allowing me the time to deal with life on life’s terms. Here, there is a calm that allows me to plan for the next day, and the next and to plan for my life.” While a participant in this program, he also attended a local college to study psychology and work towards a career in addictions’ counseling.

Today, this 2009 graduate from our Men’s New Life Program stays active in his church, and has restored relationships with his family. “It’s never been better!” Russell says.

Thank you for reaching out with hope to Russell and all the men in the New Life Program!


Men's Transitional Living Program

The Men’s Transitional Living Program, located on the second floor of 148 Taylor Street, provides 17 men who have completed the Men’s New Life Program with housing, case management and counseling, at no charge. The men are required to secure employment and establish a savings plan with a portion of their salary to be used later when they transition into the community for expenses associated with moving and setting up their own residence.

Budget  $532,600.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Transitional Housing
Population Served Adults Homeless Males
Program Short-Term Success 
Updated information  for 2014 coming soon.
Program Long-Term Success 
The Men's Transitional Living Program provides an opportunity for its participants to take meaningful steps toward becoming responsible and productive members of the community. The ultimate success is to empower the men with milestones in their self-confidence to establish a stable career path and earn a sustainable wage to meet their permanent living needs.
 
Once an individual has graduated from the program, SRM does not have the staff in place to continue to follow their long term success. Thus, a realistic and quantifiable measure of their success is unattainable. SRM welcomes and encourages our program guests to keep in touch and continue to update us on their life achievements. It is not uncommon that one of our staff members will see them conincidently at a place of employment where our staff member happened to be conducting business with thay employer, or at a restaurant enjoying a meal with their friends or family.
Program Success Monitored By 

The Program Participants focus on securing employment and housing as well as taking personal responsibility for each area of their life. SRM case managers monitor how participants put to use what they learned while enrolled in the program (their resourcefulness, accountability, personal responsibility of health and finances, etc.). Case managers meet with participants as needed to guide and encourage their progress through graduation from the program while documenting their achievements, improvements and set-backs.

 
The  program staff document the key steps the participants make in the program such as, number of job interviews, and when employment is secured. The also document their progress in seeking affordable housing, or enrollment in a college or vocational institution to advnce their job skills. A monthly report is submitted to the Program Manager and the Executive Director.
Examples of Program Success 
Updated information  for 2014 coming soon

Operation Sonshine

Operation SONshine is the Springfield Rescue Mission's mobile feeding program to the inner city community distributing meals, food boxes, clothing, blankets, rain ponchos, and toiletries. The van goes out on the streets three to four times a week to feed and care for those who are homeless or living in crisis.
Budget  $253,100.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Emergency Assistance
Population Served Homeless Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success  Operation SONshine operates 3-4 times a week providing food and personal care items to homeless, poor and needy. This program serve approximately 600 meals a week with the help of volunteers, donors and staff. Short term goals are to meet immedate needs of the hungry in our area.
Program Long-Term Success 
Operation SONshine is a mobile outreach program to serve very low-income neighborhoods in the City of Springfield, MA. The mobile van is operational 3-4 times a week providing food and personal care items to homeless, poor and needy.  This program now serves up to 1000 meals a week with the help of volunteers, donors and staff.  Ultimately our goal is to increase days of operation to between five and six trips per week, feeding up to 1000 people per week via Operation SONshine.  We also direct homeless men to our Emergency Shelter to encourage and give opportunity for them to change their lives during our Operation SONshine stops.
Program Success Monitored By 
Program success is monitored by the Outreach Chaplain who operates the van for the delivery of services. Our Outreach Chaplain is assisted by volunteers who help distribute the food and personal care items. Our Outreach Chaplain tracks the total number of meals served each day of operation and documents any emergency supplies that are given to those in need, such as blankets, clothing, hygiene items, etc..
Examples of Program Success 
This winter as we started a Sunday Service Street Outreach we noticed a familiar sight – a makeshift tent – a tarp to block the wind – and a person huddled inside. As the weather got colder we noticed the same person in his makeshift shelter each week.  Every Sunday we would leave a loaf of bread and invite him to Sunday Service. But week after week he didn’t respond.
 
When the snow started to fall and it was so cold that it hurt to breath, we noticed the tent was empty. Then, last Sunday after the service, a man approached our van and said, “I recognize your voice”. The man pulled a loaf of bread out of his pocket and said that the bread we had left him each week sustained him. He remembered the voice that preached God’s Word. He remembered fighting himself to go and join in or stay and reject our invitation.  But he just couldn’t get the voice out of his head. 
 
He came that particular Sunday to listen to the message and approached the van because we had invited anyone who was willing to accept Jesus as Savior. He came forward to do just that!

Public Breakfast

The Springfield Rescue Mission provides a public breakfast meal for up to 75-100 homeless/low-income men, women and children six days a week.
 
A nutritious meal at the Springfield Rescue Mission is often the first step for men and women on their journey to breaking the cycle of homelessness or preventing homelessness. SRM staff members encourage homeless men who come to the Mission for meals to participate in SRM’s Emergency Services Program, while poor and homeless women and children are directed to safe shelters or other community services that can meet their needs.
The staff coordinate the meal planning in order to provide a balanced, nutritious meal at each setting. The inventory of food and supplies is also assessed weekly and monthly, and purchase orders are placed by the staff when donated items are not sufficient to meet the needs. SRM’s key food service personnel are required to take the ServSafe® Food Safety Certification Course as designated by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 
Budget  $24,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Emergency Assistance
Population Served Adults College Aged (18-26 years) Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Each day, 75-100 hungry men, women and children from the community will receive a nutritious meal, and for a day, and for every day they come, hunger pains disappear and anxiety about providing their children food disappears. Moreover, perhaps the Public Breakfast meals they receive - free of charge - allows them to pay one more month's rent until other income resources can be met.

Program Long-Term Success 

One of the long term measures of success by providing our Public Breakfast is to alleviate the increasing hunger insecurity among poor, unemployed and homeless men, women and children in our community. Many individuals and families who come to SRM for meals are not homeless but are living below the poverty line. Eating breakfast in SRM’s main dining room or receiving a bag of groceries is a significant help to these men, women and children.

A nutritious meal at SRM is the first step for many men and women on their journey to breaking the cycle of homelessness or preventing homelessness. SRM staff encourage homeless men who come to the Mission for meals to participate in SRM's Emergency Service Programs, while poor and homeless women and children are directed to safe shelters or other community services that can meet their needs. Unfortunately, for the past six years, the number of poor and homeless individuals seeking SRM's Public Breakfast has increased annually. And although the economy is showing signs of improvement nationwide, those in Massachusetts who were most affected by the recession over the past five years through unemployment and foreclosures are still struggling to regain their footing.
 

Each day, the Springfield Rescue Mission is impacting hundreds of lives, and even those receiving a meal experience more than the nutritional sustenance. The men, women and children know that they are welcomed into a safe, clean and compassionate environment. SRM staff members are always seeking to encourage each guest with a smile, an inspirational statement and/or further assistance to improve their life.

Program Success Monitored By 

The outcomes of the Public Breakfast are measured by the information collected on each meal by the Program Staff. The staff and volunteers under the direction of the Food Service Manager are responsible for tracking the number of meals served and the number of men, women and children served at each meal. Each month, SRM’s Program staff create a qualitative and quantitative report that is submitted to the executive director and reviewed at monthly management meetings for further assessment of SRM’s goals and objectives.

Examples of Program Success 

Update for 2014 coming soon.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

I have had the pleasure and privilege of working at the Springfield Rescue Mission for over 28 years. I have seen it grow over the years into a community leader in the field of homeless care, including food, shelter, clothing, and rehabilitation services for thousands of men, women and children each year. 
 
We now are confronted with expanding needs for our services in the community due to economic circumstances. These increased needs have caused us to outgrow the capacity of our current facilities.

We explored a number of locations and found the property operated formerly by Orr Cadillac was the only site that truly fits our requirements. The building renovations are under way and we will move to the facility later in 2015.While the building itself will be paid for by the owners of the casino, SRM will need to raise funds to outfit the location.

To accomplish the move will require a $579,000 in relocation expenses. A $100,000 initial pledge was put forth by a generous group of Springfield Rescue Mission supporters and was successfully presented to the public in May as a Matching Challenge. We are now looking to corporate and foundation donors to help fill the gap.

The increase in services will double in areas. Items such as beds and armoires to house the increase in rehabilitation services amount to $62,971. To accommodate the increased services in our Learning Center we will need to raise $26,600. And we need to raise $80,000 to outfit the new kitchen and dining facilities, which will double our current capacity to feed the homeless each morning at our Public Breakfast.

If there’s one thing I know, it’s that God answers prayer. And we believe He has answered our prayers! Before a casino was even proposed for Springfield, we had been looking to relocate to a larger, more modern facility within the South End that would allow us to better meet the needs of the hungry, homeless, addicted, and poor in our community we serve. We are excited to see what God has in store for us next!
 
Ron Willoughby, Executive Director/CEO

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Ronald Willoughby
CEO Term Start June 1986
CEO Email rwilloughby@springfieldrescuemission.org
CEO Experience Mr. Willoughby recently completed his Masters Degree in Business Management (A.B.D.) and has served as Executive Director and CEO of the Springfield Rescue Mission for over 28 years. Mr. Willoughby is active in his personal leadership development and is currently doing research on Best Practices for Board Development and Marketing a Non-profit. He has held numerous positions on committees of the Association of Gospel Rescue Mission, a membership organization with over 250 rescue mission members nationally and internationally. Also Mr. Willoughby has been active in local groups as the Springfield Mayor’s Homeless Task Committee. Mr. Willoughby is a former President of the AGRM Northeast District and founder of Rescue Missions in Hartford CT, Nova Scotia, Nashua NH, and Providence RI.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Ronald Willoughby Executive Director/CEO --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Finalist "Excellence in Leadership" Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The management practices of the Springfield Rescue Mission are in conformity with the requirements of two important industry groups that serve the national network of 275 Gospel Rescue Missions. Those organizations are the AGRM (Association of Gospel Rescue Missions) with hundreds of members and ECFA (Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability).

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 15
Number of Part Time Staff 7
Number of Volunteers 950
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 19
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 5
Male: 17
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Robert Blakeslee
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Chair Term June 2010 - May 2020
Board Co-Chair Mr. Joseph L Manna
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Former Director of Brand Marketing U.S.A. Lego Systems Inc.
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2009 - May 2020

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Robert Blakeslee Retired, 2nd V.P. of Retirement Services MAMutual Insurance Voting
Kevin Day no institutional affilication Voting
Stanley Kline Retired, Transport Worker Voting
Joseph Manna no institutional affilication Voting
James Manzi Retired Voting
Ms. Geraldine Warton Attorney, Hartford Financial Services Group Voting
Ronald Willoughby Willoughby Executive Director and CEO, Springfield Rescue Mission Exofficio

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 1
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We have just recently relocated into a larger and newer facility which presents benefits and challenges. We have more room to service more homeless but the cost of doing "business" has increased tremendously. We are looking to hire additional staff and balance the programming costs with new and unforseen charges. With God's help, all is well!

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year June 01, 2015 to May 31, 2016
Projected Income $2,409,250.00
Projected Expense $2,402,623.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 audited financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $5,183,415 $5,474,968 $4,178,839
Total Expenses $5,175,069 $5,529,797 $4,338,060

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$106,707 $96,052 $57,605
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $669,211 $591,886 $514,572
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $184,228 $235,177 $207,757
Investment Income, Net of Losses $394 $-373 --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $1,043,571 $959,240 $969,275
Revenue In-Kind $3,048,842 $3,413,945 $2,345,019
Other $130,462 $179,041 $84,611

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $3,983,243 $4,321,594 $3,263,471
Administration Expense $511,238 $474,372 $457,445
Fundraising Expense $680,588 $733,831 $617,144
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 0.99 0.96
Program Expense/Total Expenses 77% 78% 75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 37% 45% 40%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,159,140 $1,129,853 $1,155,327
Current Assets $74,826 $72,364 $57,996
Long-Term Liabilities $62,982 $100,121 $172,099
Current Liabilities $284,340 $226,260 $124,927
Total Net Assets $811,818 $803,472 $858,301

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 0.26 0.32 0.46

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 5% 9% 15%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

At the Springfield Rescue Mission we are privileged to serve the physical and spiritual needs of the hungry, homeless, addicted and poor in our community. We are grateful for the support of so many donors and volunteers, and being able to operate without asking for direct government funding. And, we are proud of a 122 year history of providing services to the thousands upon thousands who have been helped.
 
Last year 96% of our funding came from individual donors and businesses, 2% came from regional churches and 2% from grants and foundations. We do accept direct government funding.

Year after year we see increased demand for the programs we offer. I foresee an immediate need for increased and additional services for the men, women and children seeking assistance from SRM, especially in addressing food insecurity among the populace. We are actively searching for a building to meet the expanding need for our services to the thousands of hungry, homeless, addicted and poor we serve each year.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

SRM's Emergency Service Programs offer an array of critical services that target different populations in their areas of need for food, clothing, employment and/or shelter. The scope of the programs aim to be preventative as well as restorative in helping low-income and homeless men, women and children become healthy, responsible and productive members of the community while alleviating the increasing food insecurity among poor, unemployed and homeless men, women and children.
Founded in 1892, the Springfield Rescue Mission (SRM) provides critical, basic services to those in need. In fiscal year 2014-2015, SRM expects to serve approximately 7,000 individuals through these programs. For those individuals served at SRM who are working, looking for work, unable to work, homeless, etc., receiving free daily meals gives them access to health, nutritional food to keep their energy up. It helps them save money; and provides our staff an opportunity to offer more substantive assistance. For example, SRM's Public Breakfast and Grocery Bag distribution helps single mothers utilize the money they would have spent on groceries instead for rent, transportation or other basic necessities not available through community agencies.
The following is a list of programs offered each year under the Emergency Service Programs, all of which are provided free of charge:
1. Men's Emergency Shelter Program -- SRM's 43-bed Emergency Shelter (148 Taylor Street, Springfield) is situated in an area of greatest need as recently identified by the Springfield, Massachusetts, Neighborhood Stabilization Program. It provides homeless men with meals, safe shelter, hygiene items, counseling and referrals to community resources when appropriate. The Emergency Shelter expects to serve approximately 600 unduplicated men annually, ages 18 years and older.
2. Food Service Programs -- SRM plans to provide approximately 100,000 meals to individuals and families in need through the following food programs:
a. Meals for Men in Resident Programs: Three meals/day are served seven days/week to homeless men enrolled in SRM's Men's New Life Rehabilitation Program and Transitional Living Program; and two meals/day for guests at the Men's Emergency Shelter. All three programs have a combined shelter capacity of 100 men/day. (62,734 meals in 2014)
b. A Public Breakfast: SRM is the only organization in the community with a public breakfast serving a nutritious morning meal six days/week for up to 100 hungry and homeless men, women and children each day. (14,189 breakfasts in 2014)
c. Operation SONshine: SRM is a community partner in the fight against hunger among low-income families and individuals. Operation SONshine is a mobile food service unique to SRM that delivers an average of 200 nutritious meals/day on each day of operation to the homeless and residents of Springfield's low-income neighborhoods. (10,568 meals in 2014)
d. Holiday Meals: a traditional sit-down holiday meal is served to the hungry and homeless on Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas. (2,342 holiday meals in 2014)
e. Groceries: SRM distributes bags of groceries filled with nutritious food items to anyone in need, upon request, depending on inventory of food items.
3. Give-Away Center -- Each week, SRM's Give-Away Center provides an average of 100 men, women and children with clothing, hygiene items, plus other items. (123,699 pounds of clothing items distributed and 1,866 individuals served in 2014)
The primary goal of the Springfield Rescue Mission's Emergency Service Programs is to meet men, women and children where they are, offer them access to supportive services and encourage them to take the steps needed to lead a productive and fulfilling life. In 2014, SRM served 7,000 men, women and children in need serving 87,491 nutritious meals; provided 20,214 warm safe beds; distributed 123,699 pounds of clothing items; and served 2,342 holiday meals at Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Since meals are often the first point of entry for many poor and homeless individuals at SRM, your support of our food programs in turn will help us achieve other important objectives in 2014-2015, including: Over 50% of the men who are in the Men's Emergency Shelter will implement a job search. Of those who actively search, approximately 80% of the men secure employment within 90 days.

Each program has its own process of collecting and measuring information regarding the services it provides: from intake forms and case management reports for the Emergency Shelter to tracking the number of meals served by the Food Service Programs or the number of clothing and/or other items distributed by the Give-Away Center. The Springfield Rescue Mission's data collection is specific and detailed as it is critical to the success of its programs and, more importantly, to the success of the participants in SRM's programs. SRM's data reporting procedures also meet IRS regulations for nonprofit organizations for reporting on the IRS Form 990.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Each of the program areas offered by the Springfield Rescue Mission have one staff member who is responsible for ensuring that the data used to measure their program's services is collected daily and at the time the service is rendered. The information is documented in a hard copy form and/or in computer files generated by the staff member in charge of the specific program. At the end of each month, the program staff member submits the monthly data outcomes to an administrative staff member and a Program Manager who compile a summary report of the total services provided based on the daily collected data. The administrative staff member collates each program's monthly totals into an Excel document for administrative records. This process ensures there is always an "up-to-date" total of the services provided by SRM that is available for management or program staff to review and/or use for comparison of trends with previous months and years.

At the end of the year, an Annual Report is generated by the administrative staff person and a Program Manager and disseminated in an appropriate format to Executive and Program Staff, Board members and donors.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Each of the program areas offered by the Springfield Rescue Mission have one staff member who is responsible for ensuring that the data used to measure their program's services is collected daily and at the time the service is rendered. The information is documented in a hard copy form and/or in computer files generated by the staff member in charge of the specific program. At the end of each month, the program staff member submits the monthly data outcomes to an administrative staff member and a Program Manager who compile a summary report of the total services provided based on the daily collected data. The administrative staff member collates each program's monthly totals into an Excel document for administrative records. This process ensures there is always an "up-to-date" total of the services provided by SRM that is available for management or program staff to review and/or use for comparison of trends with previous months and years.

At the end of the year, an Annual Report is generated by the administrative staff person and a Program Manager and disseminated in an appropriate format to Executive and Program Staff, Board members and donors.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

We will transition to our new location at 10 Mill Street, Springfield to provide even more meals, shelter, care, and life-changing services to a rapidly increasing number of desperate people. The Springfield Rescue Mission must seize the opportunity to increase our capacity to serve. With your help, we will expand upon our commitment to never turn anyone in need away. And with your faithful financial assistance and prayers, we will spread our outreach and enlarge our capacity to save and serve.

On any given night there are 2,115 homeless men, women, and children in Hampden county. Massachusetts has experienced the fifth highest increase in homelessness in the country since 2007, up by 15.7% (2013 Point-in-Time Count).

* Impoverished: These individuals are poor, indigent, or in financial/health crisis. According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness, the odds of experiencing homelessness within a given year for people at or below the federal poverty line are estimated to be 800% greater than the general population.1 In the City of Springfield, 23.2% of residents have incomes below the poverty level, and 43.8% of those living in poverty are children.

* Unemployed: As a region, Greater Springfield continues to lag in economic recovery as evidenced by its unemployment rate. Springfield's unemployment rate was 10.2% in September 2014 compared with the statewide rate of 6% in September 2014.2  

Opportunity for Impact

Current Location

New Facility

Percent Increase

Men’s New Life Rehabilitation

40 men per night

60 men per night

50%

Public Breakfast

50 seats at the table

100 seats at the table

100%

Give-Away Center Guests

100 appointments/wk

150 appointments/wk

50%

 

1“State of Homelessness in America” by the Homelessness Research Institute and National Alliance to End Homelessness.

2 Mass.gov