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Homes for Our Troops

 6 Main Street
 Taunton, MA 02780
[P] (508) 8233300 x 8233300
[F] (508) 823-5411
www.hfotusa.org
[email protected]
Maegan Socha
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INCORPORATED: 2004
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 54-2143612

LAST UPDATED: 11/14/2017
Organization DBA HFOT, HFOT USA
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Homes For Our Troops (HFOT) is a privately funded 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization that builds and donates specially adapted custom homes nationwide for severely injured post – 9/11 Veterans, to enable them to rebuild their lives.

Mission Statement

Homes For Our Troops (HFOT) is a privately funded 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization that builds and donates specially adapted custom homes nationwide for severely injured post – 9/11 Veterans, to enable them to rebuild their lives.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2017 to Sept 30, 2018
Projected Income $30,749,703.00
Projected Expense $30,695,188.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • New Home Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Homes For Our Troops (HFOT) is a privately funded 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization that builds and donates specially adapted custom homes nationwide for severely injured post – 9/11 Veterans, to enable them to rebuild their lives.


Background Statement

Homes For Our Troops (HFOT) is a privately funded non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization that was founded in 2004 by a Massachusetts home builder. The builder sought an organization through which he could use his 20 years of experience building homes to address the unique housing needs for Veterans with severe injuries. Finding no such organization, he began by building one home in Massachusetts, and founded HFOT, an organization committed to helping the most seriously injured Veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan since September 11, 2001. We have grown from a small group of volunteers to a staff of over 60.

We are a privately funded non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization committed to helping the most seriously injured Veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan since September 11, 2001 These Veterans sustained severe injuries including multiple limb amputations, paralysis, and/or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). With more than ten years of experience building homes, we have created a unique home design that offers 100% barrier-free living to Veterans, giving back some of the freedom and independence they sacrificed when injured while serving our country.

HFOT homes are ADA and VA compliant, with approximately 40 major special adaptations including roll-in showers with digital temperature control, roll-under counter-tops, cook tops, and sinks, and other specialized items such as lift systems, keyless door entry, and voice-activation controls dependent on the individual’s needs. Our single-level, energy efficient homes are approximately 2,650 square feet with four bedrooms and two baths. Additionally, we include wheelchair accessible exterior walkways, emergency home generators, and a master bedroom closet that is a steel reinforced concrete storm room built to FEMA standards.


Impact Statement

At this time, HFOT has built and donated our specially adapted custom homes to over 245 Veterans in 42 states. In fiscal year 2017 we presented 22 Veterans the keys to their new home. We welcomed 31 new Veterans into our program, and purchased 34 parcels of land for Veterans. 

Our ultimate goal is to ensure that all severely injured post-9/11 Veterans are in a home that meets their needs. Our goals for fiscal year 2018 include the completion of 30 new homes, purchase of 35 new parcels of land, and to welcome 24 new Veterans into our program. We will also continue to assist the Veterans in our program with rebuilding their lives through support and services.

Entwined with our ultimate goal, and the guiding principle in all that we do, are our efforts to assist Veterans and their families rebuild their lives. An important objective is to continue to build relationships with other Veteran Service Organizations. These relationships allow us to direct Veterans towards qualified assistance for needs outside the scope of our mission, such as obtaining Action Trak wheelchairs for “off-road” access, pro bono legal counseling, or to connect with a support community. This July, we hosted an off-site Veteran Symposium with other Veteran Service Organizations as well as the MA Department of Veteran Services. This event was a productive way to share resources, raise awareness, and build relationships. We anticipate hosting another Veteran Symposium this upcoming fiscal year.


Needs Statement

Homes For Our Troops’ top 5 needs:

1. Financial Donations

2. Corporate Sponsors/Building Partnerships

3. Volunteers

4. Building Materials

5. Suitable parcels of land for Veterans' homes


CEO Statement

 


Board Chair Statement

We’ve been tremendously successful these first 13 years, but numbers alone should not measure our success. Homes for Our Troops continues to restore freedom and independence to Veterans who have sustained injuries so severe, traditional homes no longer provide them a sanctuary, but are a daily reminder of the challenges to be faced for the rest of their lives. Our mission enlightens each community, in which we build homes, providing individuals the opportunity to “give back” to those who have sacrificed so much. It attracts skilled workers to build homes that enable our Veterans to rebuild their lives. The difference made by donors, supporters, volunteers, and countless others is apparent on a daily basis. As we look ahead, we realize Homes for Our Troops needs the continued, nurturing support of municipalities, corporations, foundations, volunteers, and those individuals who are able to donate or those who can simply spread the word.

Richard A. Cody

General USA, Ret.

Chairman of the Board

Homes For Our Troops


Geographic Area Served

NATIONAL

HFOT builds our homes nationwide, where the Veteran chooses to live. .When a Veteran is accepted into our program, they let us know where they want to live; we find an acceptable lot, purchase the lot, and begin construction. We do not restrict where we build, however certain areas are challenging due to availability of acceptable parcels of land that meet all of our requirements. Visit our interactive map to see where we have built: http://www.hfotusa.org/map

Organization Categories

  1. Public & Societal Benefit - Military/Veterans' Organizations
  2. Housing, Shelter -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

New Home Program

HFOT has one program, the New Home Program. Eligible Veterans medically qualify for the Specially Adapted Housing (SAH) Grant by the Veterans Administration; have been injured in combat or in support of combat operations in the Iraq/Afghanistan theater of war after Sept 11, 2001; and are retired or in the retirement process. HFOT conducts thorough reviews of each Veteran, including a criminal and financial background check.

The final stage of the application process is the Veterans Conference, a three-day workshop for Veterans and their families to learn firsthand about the benefits and responsibilities of receiving a specially adapted home, as well as help them understand the expectations involved with their home-build project. HFOT also conducts its final assessment and interview with the Veterans to complete this process.

HFOT homes are ADA and VA compliant, with approximately 40 major special adaptations including roll-in showers with digital temperature control, roll-under counter-tops, cook tops, and sinks, and other specialized items such as lift systems, keyless door entry, and voice-activation controls dependent on the individual’s needs. Our single-level, energy efficient homes are approximately 2,650 square feet with four bedrooms and two baths. Additionally, we include wheelchair accessible exterior walkways, emergency home generators, and a master bedroom closet that is a steel reinforced concrete storm room built to FEMA standards.

 

HFOT builds our homes where each Veteran in our program chooses to live. We donate the homes to the Veteran, removing the financial burden so the Veteran and his or her family can focus on their recovery and future.

We see helping the Veterans and their families to rebuild their lives as the most important aspect of our mission. Although the Veteran pays no mortgage, HFOT places a ten-year lien on the home, with no equity for the first five years, followed by accrual of 20% per year until the Veteran completely owns the home after 10 years. This safeguards our donors’ investments in the program and also provides a period of time for Veteran and his or her family to acclimate to the responsibilities of homeownership.

To assist with these new responsibilities, Homes For Our Troops provides three years of pro-bono financial planning to every Veteran in our program. This encourages financial literacy and provides opportunity for successful homeownership. Having a donated home eliminates a major financial burden, and enables the Veterans to focus on furthering their education, getting back to the work force or returning to their life’s work of serving others.

  
Budget  30,000,000
Category  Housing, General/Other Barrier-Free Housing
Population Served Veterans People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities US
Program Short-Term Success 

Our program's short-term success may be measured in the amount of specially adapted homes we build and donate to Veterans in our program, and other metrics such as how many Veterans we welcome to our program, and how many parcels of land we purchase. Building homes is only the beginning, our tagline is "Building Homes, Rebuilding Lives", and it is what the Veteran and his or her family are able to achieve once in their HFOT home that measures our true success. 

Program Long-Term Success 

Our long-term is demonstrated in accomplishments of Veterans once in their home. Living in a barrier-free, donated home that built to their needs allow Veterans and their families to focus on health improvements, education, new therapies, and their dreams. The pro bono financial planning we provide gives opportunity for our home recipients to grow their financial literacy and be successful homeowners, in addition to planning for future expenses such as starting a business or college education. Our warranty coverage and specialized staff available for homeowner education provide home recipients support as they adjust to the new responsibilities of home ownership. 

Many Veterans report improvements to their physical and mental well-being, while many caregivers and spouses report a peace of mind achieved by the safer environment an HFOT home offers for their Veteran. Also,they often have more ability to pursue their own education and careers now that the Veteran is able to live more independently at home. The whole family benefits, truly; many Veterans report an expanded ability to be a part of family activities - such a bed or bath times - in a home that is wholly accessible. 
Program Success Monitored By 

Community support is critical to each build as well as meaningful to each Veteran. We track the number volunteers supporting the home build process, as well as those hosting fundraisers in the community to provide monetary contributions for a project. This allows us to build meaningful relationships in those communities.

We conduct after action reviews (AAR) at the completion of all home builds and other events, such as community outreach, fundraising and marketing events. AARs allow staff and leadership to evaluate each step of the build or event and to identify improvements forthe future, or successes to recreate. As a team, we discuss what went well, what needs improvement, how we improve and who is responsible for implementing changes. We are then able to target change that is necessary for our growth in a consistent and effective way. Another way we evaluate our progress is to monitor cost, time, and quality to our standards for home builds. We maximize donations of labor and materials for each home we build, which allows us to stretch our monetary donations further – allowing us to build more homes. Our team also meets quarterly and annually to assess progress on revenue goals and compare results with objectives.

In an ongoing effort to ensure we are delivering the best possible homes for our Veteran recipients, to gather feedback on the effectiveness of our overall program, and to add another layer of support for the Veterans we serve, HFOT created a Veteran Action and Advisory Team (VAAT). Made up of 6 Veteran home recipients and 1 Veteran spouse and caregiver, the VAAT promotes the HFOT mission, provides critical feedback to leadership, and connects with fellow Veterans in the HFOT family to ensure each Veteran has the support they need to rebuild their lives.

 

Examples of Program Success 

Our Veterans accomplishments once in their home demonstrate our real progress. We measure the impact an HFOT home

brings to Veterans in several ways. For example, we look at the number of Veterans starting or finishing college degree programs, their ability to start or expand their family, and their successes in new business ventures or careers. One of the most tangible outcomes is the amount of time they continue to live in the home as a successful homeowner and other quality of life improvement they have accomplished since living in their home.

Once in their HFOT home, many Veterans share stories of a new capacity to join in family activities in the home and improvements to their health and wellbeing. Army SGT Eric Edmundson received his specially adapted home in North Carolina in 2007. Due to an anoxic brain injury caused by cardiac arrest when he stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED), he was not able to walk, use his hands, or speak. The home has enough space for Eric’s mother and father to live with Eric, his wife, and their young child, to provide the support needed to care for the family. In 2016, SGT Edmundson’s father wrote to HFOT to report Eric had achieved significant improvement in use of his hands, now walks with a walker, and has improved cognitive ability.

Army SPC Geoffrey Quevedo received his home in California in June of 2015. He and his wife welcomed their first child a year later. Geoffrey, who in 2012 lost his left leg below the knee and his left arm below the elbow when he stepped on a pressure-plated IED, shares how his wife was able to take a well-earned weekend trip away while he stayed home with their infant son, due to the adaptations in their HFOT home. Geoffrey, known for his humor, joked that he told his wife she could stay away as long as she wanted; he had it all under control.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director General Timothy P. McHale USA, Ret
CEO Term Start Feb 2012
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Major General USA, Ret. Timothy P. McHale was born and raised in Minnesota. In May 1977 he completed his undergraduate studies at St. John’s University Collegeville, Minnesota as a Distinguished Military Graduate with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Transportation Corps.
During his 35 years of service, he has commanded both aviation and logistics units of every echelon from platoon to theater support command, with duty in Germany, Korea, Iraq, Afghanistan, and throughout the United States.
Major General McHale held several key staff positions on the Department of the Army Staff, The Joint Staff, US Forces Korea, Multi-National Forces-Iraq, and US Forces Afghanistan.
He holds Master’s Degrees in Management from Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, and National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College. He is a former National Security Fellow, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.
Major General McHale has been married to his wife Janice for over 32 years and they have two sons, Casey who is a First Lieutenant in the U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division and Riley who is attending Bishop Ireton High School in Alexandria, Virginia.

Co-CEO William D. Ivey
Co-CEO Term Start Jan 2014
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience

Originally from Minnesota, Bill Ivey is a retired Infantryman who served 31 years in the U. S. Army. Assignments included Fort Benning Georgia, Fort Bragg North Carolina, Hawaii, Korea, Japan, and Iraq. He had the opportunity to command units from platoon through brigade, serve as an observer/controller at the Joint Readiness Training Center, and serve on several joint and Army staffs, including chief of staff of Eighth Army in Korea and a deputy task force commander in Iraq. Following his retirement from the Army in 2006, he joined the Army’s Asymmetric Warfare Group, a unique unit that combined retired senior NCOs and officers with senior active duty personnel to embed with units in Iraq and Afghanistan, identify problems, develop solutions, and disseminate those solutions to units preparing to deploy. His seven years as an operational advisor with that unit took him back to Korea, Iraq, and Afghanistan.

Bill joined Homes For Our Troops as its executive director in January, 2014, and is honored to have this opportunity to join the Homes For Our Troops Team in its important mission of returning freedom and independence to our Veterans who have sacrificed so much for our American freedoms.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Timothy P McHale Feb 2012 Dec 2016
Mr. John S. Gonsalves Feb 2004 Feb 2012

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Cindy Baptiste Director of Finance --
Kristi Galanek Director of Marketing --
Chris Mitchell Director of Corporate and Community Engagement --
Isabel Pais Director of IT Services --
Richard Pratt -- --
Cheryl Wick Director of Office Management --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Community Service Award National Association of State Contractors Licensing Agencies 2008
Homes built in each presidential convention city Credit Union National Association / 2008 Democratic and Republican Presidential Conventions 2008
DAR Medal of Honor to John Gonsalves, president and founder Daughters of the American Revolution 2007
Medal for Exceptional Public Service Office of the Secretary of Defense 2007
Newman's Own Award Newman's Own Award 2006

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


 

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 56
Number of Part Time Staff 9
Number of Volunteers 10,000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 62
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 38
Male: 26
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair General Richard A. Cody
Board Chair Company Affiliation L-3 Communications
Board Chair Term Oct 2011 - Oct 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
General John R Allen Retired Voting
Ms. Valerie Lynn Baldwin US House of Representatives Voting
General Richard A. Cody Senior VP L-3 Communications Voting
Mr. Gerald W. Howard National Association of Home Builders Voting
Sgt. Adam Kisielewski Homes for Our Troops, home recipient Voting
Major General (USA, R) Timothy P. McHale President, Director Voting
SMA Kenneth O. Preston President Voting
General Robert W. RisCassi Retired Voting
Dr. Joseph G. San Miguel Professor Emeritus Naval PostGraduate School Voting
COL Michelle Yarborough Cypress International Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2017 to Sept 30, 2018
Projected Income $30,749,703.00
Projected Expense $30,695,188.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

2008 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $21,442,238 $21,379,749 $17,651,491
Total Expenses $23,048,943 $21,348,441 $21,092,807

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $18,437,550 $20,493,302 $16,817,699
Indirect Public Support $1,865,810 $248,173 $249,734
Earned Revenue $18,159 -- $15,501
Investment Income, Net of Losses $140,406 $140,501 $109,798
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $980,313 $483,388 $458,759
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $14,385 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $20,427,478 $18,728,328 $18,855,335
Administration Expense $1,177,850 $1,438,902 $1,096,349
Fundraising Expense $1,443,615 $1,181,211 $1,141,123
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.93 1.00 0.84
Program Expense/Total Expenses 89% 88% 89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 7% 6% 7%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $19,038,241 $22,225,781 $25,052,725
Current Assets $7,332,471 $8,836,889 $13,896,749
Long-Term Liabilities $4,884,629 $6,906,703 $9,606,000
Current Liabilities $1,010,020 $794,714 $774,227
Total Net Assets $13,143,592 $14,524,364 $14,672,498

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 7.26 11.12 17.95

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 26% 31% 38%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakdown was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

It is our goal to ensure that all severely injured veterans that meet our qualifications will be appropriately housed by HFOT or another organization. If we accomplish this mission, we can expand our scope to continue serving severely injured veterans in other ways or expand our eligibility requirements.

      

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Following the completion of all home builds and other events (community outreach, fundraising, marketing, etc.), we conduct an after action review to evaluate each step and make changes as needed. We understand that change is necessary for growth but consistency is vital in carrying out our mission efficiently. The after action reviews identify what went well, what needs improvement, how we improve, and who is responsible for implementing the changes. Maximizing donations of labor and materials for each home we build allows us to stretch our monetary donations further, enabling us to build even more homes. We monitor cost, time, and quality and compare to our standards for home building, we also establish annual and quarterly revenue goals, and compare results with objectives.

Because of the relationships we maintain with our home recipients, we can evaluate the impact the HFOT home is making on their lives. Last year, we have established an initiative, “HFOT by the numbers”, to better monitor the effectiveness and success of our program. By surveying and recording all of the information based on the Veterans’ before and after experiences with our program, we can compile statistics with respect to their families, education, and careers, and will use this information to strengthen our program as we grow.

The true impact of our mission is best defined by the individual success stories of each of our home recipients. We measure several factors to identify how we helped improve a Veteran’s life. For example, we look at the number of Veterans who have started and/or finished a college degree program, the number of years they have been a successful homeowner, their ability to start or expand their family, their successes in new business ventures or careers, how long they remain in the home, and other quality of life changes they have accomplished since living in their specially adapted home.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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