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Boston Children's Chorus, Inc.

 112 Shawmut Avenue, Suite 5B
 Boston, MA 02118
[P] (617) 7782242
[F] (617) 7782248
http://www.bostonchildrenschorus.org/
[email protected]
Jan Woiler Meuse
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INCORPORATED: 2003
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 65-1188279

LAST UPDATED: 12/16/2016
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The Boston Children's Chorus harnesses the power and joy of music to unite our city's diverse communities and inspire social change. Our singers transcend social barriers in a celebration of shared humanity and love of music. Through intensive choral training and high-profile public performance experiences (locally, throughout the U.S. and around the world), they learn discipline, develop leadership skills, and proudly represent the city of Boston as ambassadors of harmony.

Mission Statement

The Boston Children's Chorus harnesses the power and joy of music to unite our city's diverse communities and inspire social change. Our singers transcend social barriers in a celebration of shared humanity and love of music. Through intensive choral training and high-profile public performance experiences (locally, throughout the U.S. and around the world), they learn discipline, develop leadership skills, and proudly represent the city of Boston as ambassadors of harmony.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $1,994,500.00
Projected Expense $1,939,617.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • BCC's Professional Development Program for Music Teachers
  • Choral Activities/Music Education
  • Social Integration Initiative
  • Tours and Excursions
  • Visiting Artists Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Boston Children's Chorus harnesses the power and joy of music to unite our city's diverse communities and inspire social change. Our singers transcend social barriers in a celebration of shared humanity and love of music. Through intensive choral training and high-profile public performance experiences (locally, throughout the U.S. and around the world), they learn discipline, develop leadership skills, and proudly represent the city of Boston as ambassadors of harmony.

Background Statement

Called "Boston's Ambassadors of Harmony" by the Boston Globe, the Boston Children’s Chorus (BCC) was founded by Hubie Jones, a social worker and community leader, who for decades has worked to address the social problems facing Boston’s vulnerable children and neighborhoods. In 2001, Mr. Jones experienced a breathtaking performance by the Chicago Children’s Choir, and returned determined to replicate this innovative program in Boston. At the time, there were no other organizations in Boston that effectively combined a mission for artistic excellence with an agenda for healing social and racial divides. After a year of planning, the Boston Children’s Chorus was launched in October of 2003. Twenty children began in an initial pilot program, and this year BCC expects to serve more than 450 youth who will participate in 13 different choirs in five Boston locations -- a central location on Shawmut Avenue in the South End and neighborhood-based locations in Dorchester, Allston-Brighton, South Boston, and the United South End Settlements in the Lower Roxbury area of the South End.

BCC draws singers from over 100 zip codes across the metropolitan area. More than half are non-white and are from an inner city neighborhood. Even with high artistic expectations, 99% of those who audition are accepted; previous training is not required. Tuition is based on a sliding-scale fee based on household income. Four out of five students receive finanical aid.

BCC has proven the importance of hearing young voices. The singers give more than 50 performances each season that range from homeless shelters and institutions of worship to the Boston Pops Fourth of July Celebration. They also take part in international cross-cultural travel and exchange opportunities, most recently to Berlin, Prague and Terezin.


Impact Statement

The Boston Children's Chorus, an integral part of Boston's cultural and social fabric, creates communities through the passionate provision of participation opportunities for all children in all neighborhoods.

Needs Statement

1. BCC significantly subsidizes tuition, ranging from $25-$1,100 based on household income, to ensure that every child has the opportunity to sing regardless of financial ability. 4 out of 5 singers receive financial aid. Up to $300,000

 2. The Social Integration Initiative is an educational framework infused throughout all choir activities and helps singers realize their capacities for compassion and empathy across differences and courage to speak out against unfairness and injustice. Singers gain a better understanding of their role in the world and pave the way for a more connected Boston. $1,600,000

 3. Community and performance initiatives related to BCC’s 14th Season (2016-2017), including the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Concert. Sponsorship range: $5,000-$100,000

 4.  Tours and Excursions provide once-in-a-lifetime performing and youth development experiences, both abroad and in the US. $150,000-$300,000, depending if tour is domestic or international.

 5. BCC builds relationships with leading professional artists and scholars in music and music education. They provide multiple training opportunities for students, audiences and are the backbone of BCC’s signature music education training program, the Professional Development Weekend. $20,000-$50,000


CEO Statement

Boston has many trademark sounds: the distinctive clank of a ball bouncing off the Green Monster; fireworks bursting over the Esplanade on the 4th of July; and the T operator's declaration, "Next Stop, Park Street." We at the Boston Children's Chorus continue our effort toward making our "Sound of Harmony" an equally inherent and identifiable part of Boston's aural landscape.

One way we're doing that is through broad recognition.

In 2013 BCC was a recipient of the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award from First Lady Michelle Obama, the nation’s highest honor for youth arts organizations. And over the past two years, BCC has been engaged with German partners at the Berlin Philharmonic as they sought to create a new youth choral program modeled on BCC principles. Some of our partners who formed Berlin’s program, Vokalhelden, were able to attend BCC’s concert when we were on tour there a year ago June. One remarked: “It was such an enrichment to have had you here! Some of the Vokalhelden-team saw the concert and now understand even better our vision of the Vokalhelden – you are our ideal!” We cannot be more pleased that this prominent musical organization has sought us out for advice and partnership.

In 2015, BCC received the Chorus America Brazeal Wayne Dennard Award, recognizing BCC’s commitment to diversity, inclusiveness and furthering African-American choral traditions.

In 2016, BCC was the recipient of the Community Recognition Award from the Peace Islands Institute, recognizing contributions to promoting peace and tolerance.
 
And, in 2017, BCC has the distinct honor of being the only chorus to represent North America at the International Youth Choir Festival at Royal Albert Hall in London. 

BCC is much more than a choral program for kids. It has aggressively entered the race-relations and equity space as a social integration organization. Our Social Integration Initiative is not window-dressing, secondary to our arts work – it is core to our day-to-day program and central to our mission.

To achieve complete harmony with our city, it is critical that the people of Boston -- all the people of Boston -- see themselves in the faces of our singers. Indeed, BCC is a microcosm of our city -- our demographic makeup is nearly identical to the city at large. Through our young, creative leaders, Boston hears its future -- one that is equitable and harmonious for all. 

Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Boston and the surrounding metro area -- more than 100 zip codes, with half of our singers from an inner city neighborhood of Boston.

Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Singing & Choral Groups
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Education - Educational Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

BCC's Professional Development Program for Music Teachers

As our Choir Program reaches natural capacity, we are seeking other avenues to benefit students. Professional development (PD) allows us to increase student impact by investing in their teachers. Boston Public School teachers receive intensive instruction, which includes monthly study group meetings led by BCC artistic leaders, classroom observation/feedback, and an annual opportunity to attend a weekend-long PD workshop in the Spring featuring a renowned guest clinician.

Budget  $65,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Partnerships in Education
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

To date, 24 teachers have benefited from intensive study group, impacting 10,000+ students beyond BCC’s membership. Each year, 40-50 educators attend each annual PD workshop weekend.

· Participating teachers will improve their teaching practices.

· Participating teachers, who were once isolated in their individual schools, join a growing, supportive community of educators and are empowered in their professional development.

· BCC strengthens its relationships with the BPS schools, resulting in stronger recruitment of BPS students into BCC.

Program Long-Term Success 

· Participating teachers will improve their teaching practices.

· Participating teachers, who were once isolated in their individual schools, join a growing, supportive community of educators and are empowered in their professional development.

· BCC strengthens its relationships with the BPS schools, resulting in stronger recruitment of BPS students into BCC.

Program Success Monitored By  Teacher learning is evaluated through one-on-one classroom evaluation and a final, culminating project in the spring. Teachers also complete annual surveys to offer feedback on their experience in the program.
Examples of Program Success 

Dan was first introduced to BCC when he attended a PD Weekend Workshop a few years ago. He liked it so much that, the following year, he decided to join the Study Group. This year, BCC was fortunate that Dan accepted our offer of a teaching fellow position for the Central Intermediate Choir (alongside his primary teaching position at the Haley Pilot School). Michele Adams, BCC’s Director of Choirs, remarks, “Dan is an example of the kind of synergy that happens for teachers as they bridge what they learn in the Study Group and apply it in their classrooms. Just the other day, a Study Group teacher demonstrated for the rest of the group a particular warm-up he does with his students. Dan told me that he planned to do that warm-up with his BCC choir tonight!” This story highlights how vital this PD work is, the immediacy of the impact, and underscores the need to have high quality, engaging PD opportunities for all BPS music teachers.


Choral Activities/Music Education

At BCC’s core is its Choir Program, a multi-tiered music education and performance program. BCC is an innovator with its replicable, sequential curriculum for sustained mastery in music theory, sight-singing and ear-training – teaching the fundamentals of music, as opposed to teaching songs by rote. The artistic standard is high, as is the call for active citizenship and social awareness.

• 13 choirs at 5 levels of ability (2-4 hours/week); choirs include a Young Men's Ensemble, for young men with changing and changed voices; a new Jr. Men’s Ensemble, for boys with still-developing musicianship skills; and Choral Union, established for older singers with no music education background.

• 40 concerts/season, including our signature event, the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Concert (MLK), held at Jordan Hall, Boston

• Student-run opportunities such as choir officer positions, responsible roles during tours & excursions, and leading community service and fundraising projects.

Budget  $1,261,547.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Music
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
 In our 2015-2016 season:

· 485 singers will demonstrate proficiency in meeting national & state learning standards for singing and reading music, including memory and accuracy in learned repertoire, music and rhythm sight-singing & reading, matching and repeating pitch patterns, and range and quality of voice.

· 90% of our singers demonstrate advanced or proficient level of musicianship and performance skills.

· 485 singers increase their abilities as creative and confident leaders; team players; critical thinkers; and effective communicators.

· 90% of our singers display satisfactory or exemplary social and behavioral standards of maturity for their age level.

Program Long-Term Success 
 As a result of participating in the BCC:

100% of youth will have a deepened understanding of themselves and appreciation of cultures other than their own; and become more empathetic and compassionate citizens in the community and strong advocates for social justice

100% of families become more tolerant, more aware of communities outside their own and more culturally and civically engaged.

100% of the members of Boston’s diverse communities will experience the BCC’s transformative musical message and develop greater understanding and appreciation of differences.

Program Success Monitored By 

BCC rigorously evaluates all aspects of our program. We have developed a logic model through which we track our outcomes and indicators, based on our theory of change, inputs, activities, and the assets our singers bring to BCC.

To evaluate growth in our singers’ musical mastery, BCC has a comprehensive and sophisticated educational framework that maps out benchmarks in five skill areas for our four choir levels (Training, Intermediate, Advanced, and Premier). Four areas of social competence/work habits are also evaluated: maturity and responsiveness; interest and enthusiasm; physical engagement; and engagement with the audience.

Singers completing their second or third year in an ensemble typically progress to the next level ensemble. Our most recent evaluations revealed that, out of a total possible score of 100 on numerous measurements of music literacy, theory, maturity/behavior, performance skills, and attendance, singers across all choirs averaged 96.85.

Examples of Program Success 

Terrell, an African-American young man from Chelsea, credits BCC for his achievement in receiving a full, four-year scholarship to Berklee College of Music. In Terrell’s words, “Everything we did at BCC, the ear training, learning to sight-read music, solfege, learning rhythms, call and response, auditioning – that all prepped me for this. When I started, I didn’t know the program would do all this. But when I was at Berklee [as a high school student in the Summer Performance Program], I was way ahead of the game. A lot of the other students had to learn these things, but I already knew it. It’s the reason I got a scholarship to the school I wanted to go to. BCC is everything to me.”

Terrell graduated from Berklee with a degree in Music Education, and is now a successful working musician and actor in Boston.


Social Integration Initiative

BCC’s Social Integration Initiative (SII) is a social justice education program that integrates anti-bias and empathy training into our music education curriculum. This year, BCC will formalize the primary singer outcome we hope to see as a result of the SII implementation. Research has demonstrated that interracial and inter-class relationships break down stereotypes and bias (Allport’s Intergroup Contact Theory, 1954). Therefore, to have the greatest impact on social change, BCC must reduce prejudice and increase empathy and understanding among our diverse students by cultivating relationships among them – particularly among those who would not normally have met otherwise. To promote connections among our singers, we will focus on the perception of equal status in dialogue and activities; engage in working toward common goals (developing musical mastery and performance skills); negotiate cooperation within and among the choirs; and create and enforce supportive and safe norms.
Budget  $1,261,547.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Citizenship
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

This season, 485 youth will:

· Have deeper diverse cultural connections

· Identify themselves as advocates for social justice.

· Identify themselves as global citizens.

Program Long-Term Success 

BCC anticipates the following long-term outcomes:

· Singers will have increased friendships with youth different from themselves, and their own biases will be diminished.

· Singers will become more empathetic and compassionate citizens in the community and agents for social change.

· Families will become more tolerant, more aware of communities outside their own and more culturally and civically engaged.

· Members of Boston’s diverse communities will experience the BCC’s transformative musical message and develop greater understanding and appreciation of differences.

· BCC will have elevated its own visibility of in its emergence as a culturally & socially relevant organization that is playing a role in re-branding Boston as a more inclusive city, and inspiring the public through demonstrating how youth can drive & lead social change.

Program Success Monitored By 

Based on the research cited above, BCC will formalize the primary singer outcome we hope to see as a result of the Social Integration Initiative implementation this season. Then, we will be able to develop an appropriate tool to measure the outcome through ongoing evaluations, so that we can begin 2017-2018 with a solid baseline and procedures to determine how well we are doing, with the ultimate goal of replicating this groundbreaking work. Examples of how we may measure impact include tracking known friendships and connections throughout the season among singers; evaluating how equal status is perceived in each choir; and measuring how often and the process by which singers work together on a common goal. We will seek thought partners for this critical work as appropriate, and will share our results once our tool is developed.


Examples of Program Success 

Singers participated in socially relevant presentations, including a more authentic performance of Woody Guthrie’s This Land Is Your Land at the 2014 TEDxBoston event (http://tedxboston.org/speaker/trecek-king-2); BCC’s annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Concert; and local Black Lives Matter protests.

Another glimpse of BCC’s impact can be seen in what some of our 2014-2015 graduating singers had to say as they reflected on their time at BCC:

Coming from a suburb 45 minutes from the city, I had never been exposed to so much diversity. BCC taught me so much more than just music. It taught me love and acceptance of others, maturity, responsibility, and leadership. – Mara

With singers coming from all over the Greater Boston area, from all kinds of families and with a remarkable range of life experiences, personalities, and goals, the BCC has created the safest of spaces for all of us to be ourselves together. -- Jessie

 

Tours and Excursions

Middle and high school singers tour domestically or internationally annually, with opportunities to learn about foreign cultures, their histories, and form friendships across national and global boundaries. Rather than a series of superficial “cultural encounters,” BCC tours put people of vastly different backgrounds together in active, inquisitive interactions that broaden perspectives and challenge pre-conceptions. Tours have made a significant impact on how BCC kids understand the world, and have helped prepare them to be better global citizens.

Budget  $300,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Musical Performances
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

This program will enable:

· 75 BCC youth to deepen social, cultural and global awareness and identify as world citizens (for int’l tours);

· 100 children develop independence, see other US cities and meet peers/adults from other walks of life

After a cultural exchange tour, our youth will:

· Better understand our differences and realize our common humanity

· Gain a unique global perspective that prepares them in their development as 21st century leaders and agents for social change.

· Practice organizational skills, responsibility, teamwork and self-reliance in unfamiliar settings – having a positive impact on confidence and self-esteem.

Program Long-Term Success 

As a result of participating in the BCC:

· Youth will have a deepened understanding of themselves and appreciation of cultures other than their own; and become more empathetic and compassionate citizens in the community and strong advocates for social justice.

· Families with singers traveling will become more tolerant, more aware of communities outside their own and more culturally and civically engaged.

Program Success Monitored By 

To evaluate the quality and impact of our Tours and Excursions experience, BCC utilizes the following evaluation tools: dedicated singer surveys and focus groups; singer travel journals for self-reflection and sharing; an annual survey/meeting with BCC parents; and an informal survey with our partners and collaborators.

Examples of Program Success 

Upon hearing BCC sing in Amman during the 2009 tour to Jordan, marking the 60th anniversary of U.S.-Jordanian Relations, U.S. Ambassador R. Stephan Beecroft noted: “You make my job easier. You convey America’s caring and values to Jordanians far better than the millions of dollars of US foreign aid does.”

A student on that tour noted, “The cultural exchanges with children, musicians, politicians, and common people in Jordan were more enlightening than anything I could ever learn while flipping through the pages of a textbook ...When I came home, I had a newfound energy to get involved with my community and make a difference.”

BCC singers also had life-changing experiences touring Germany and the Czech Republic in June 2015. “I made friends with girls in the Czech Republic whose parents had lived under Communist rule. It’s crazy to think that the Velvet Revolution took place in 1989. With all of the evil in the world, it gives me hope to see people expressing themselves through art.”


Visiting Artists Program

BCC builds relationships with renowned artists and scholars in the field; BCC brings 2-3 leaders to Boston each year for weekend and week-long residencies to interact and partner with all levels of singers and the community.

Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

This season, 485 singers will gain a disciplined work ethic, achieve independence as musicians, and gain the personal, social and creative skills that will prepare them as 21st century leaders.

Program Long-Term Success 

As a result of participating in the BCC:

· Youth will have a deepened understanding of themselves and appreciation of cultures other than their own; and become more empathetic and compassionate citizens in the community and strong advocates for social justice.

· Families will become more tolerant, more aware of communities outside their own and more culturally and civically engaged.

· Members of Boston’s diverse communities will experience the BCC’s transformative musical message and develop greater understanding and appreciation of differences.

Program Success Monitored By 

Pre- and post-season assessments and evaluations determine the level of singers’ progress in social competence, work habits, discipline and performance skills (in addition to progress in meeting national and state learning standards for singing and reading music). Singer attendance at rehearsals and performances is also measured throughout the year. Other tools to evaluate this program’s impact include: annual survey/meeting with BCC parents; focus groups with singers; exit interviews with non-returning singers; feedback instrument from partners and collaborators.

Examples of Program Success 
Thus far, 100% of our graduates have been accepted to college, or are on track to do so.
 
Jean, the mother of 10-year-old Nazeli, describes her child’s transformation:
 
Nazeli is a shy kid, not a very confident child, and very reserved. At the end of the first year in the choir, I saw a spark in her. Then throughout her whole second year, her confidence just bloomed and blossomed…Assistant Artistic Director Michele Adams was critical in bring Nazeli out of her shell and made her a leader among the group…The treble chorus is a large group, probably 20-30 kids, and Nazeli had to feel her way to be a part of it. Now, she’s one of the first to volunteer to sing a solo in front of a group. It’s mostly due to Michele pulling that leadership piece out of her, recognizing and encouraging it. Nazeli is a much more confident child. She expresses herself, and is able to say what she likes. It gives her such joy, and gives me happiness to see her this way.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The budget for the Social Integration Initiative/Leadership Development is the same as the budget for Choral Activities/Music Education because these two programs are integrated and occur at the same time.
 
The budget for tours and excursions varies from year to year depending on whether we are implementing a domestic or international tour. The budget therefore typically ranges from $150,000 to $300,000.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Anthony Trecek-King
CEO Term Start June 2015
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Anthony began with BCC in 2006 as Artistic Director and was named President and Artistic Director in June 2015.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience


Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mr. David C. Howse July 2009 Mar
Ms. Annette Rubin Oct 2005 June

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mrs. Michele Adams Director of Choirs Michele has been BCC's Assistant Artistic Director since 2007 in a role just beneath senior management level.
Ben Hires Director of Programs --
Heather Rogers Director of Finance and Administration --
Celeste Wilson Managing Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Brazeal Wayne Dennard Award Chorus America 2015
ArtsFwd Business Unusual National Challenge EmcArts 2013
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Young Leadership Award Cooperative Metropolitan Ministries 2013
National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award Winner President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities 2013
National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award Finalist President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities 2012
Margaret Hillis Award for Choral Excellence Chorus America 2011
Nonprofit Excellence Award Nominee Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2010
Gabriel Award for Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Concert Television Program The Catholic Academy of Communication Professionals 2009

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

BCC benefits from strong leaders who have built a foundation for student achievement and have propelled BCC into becoming a multi award-winning organization in its first decade. Anthony Trecek-King, Artistic Director since 2006, now also serves as President, with support from Celeste Wilson, Managing Director and a robust leadership team: Director of Choirs, Director of Programs, Director of Finance & Administration, and a Director of Philanthropy (to be identified this fall). In addition, two BCC staff members are bi-lingual (Spanish and Mandarin/ Cantonese) and were intentionally hired to help us with recruitment and build stronger relationships with our singers and their families. It is our intention to translate recruitment and other materials into another 1-2 languages by next season.

Michele Adams, previously our part-time Assistant Artistic Director, has now moved into a new, full-time role as Director of Choirs. Trecek-King continues to conduct BCC’s premier-level choirs, the Premier Choir and the Young Men’s Ensemble. The creation of the Director of Choirs position allows Trecek-King the time to strengthen his external standing in the City and enhance BCC’s visibility and brand locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. At the same time, Adams and other BCC artistic staff will be afforded a greater presence in the Boston Public Schools, further increasing BCC’s professional development work with teachers and impacting thousands of more students beyond BCC’s walls. Adams will also lead efforts in exploring additional school partnerships that could lead to an expansion of BCC’s presence throughout the metropolitan area.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 13
Number of Part Time Staff 15
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate % 93%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 4
Caucasian: 20
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 20
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 10
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Tim Ferguson
Board Chair Company Affiliation Next Street Financial, LLC
Board Chair Term Feb 2011 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Pamela Adams No Affiliation Voting
Krystal P. Banfield Ed. D Berklee College of Music Voting
Taylor Bodman Brown Brothers Harriman Voting
Ms. Margaret E. Clough Loomis, Sayles & Company Voting
Susan Conkling Boston University College of Fine Arts --
Tim Ferguson Next Street Financial, LLC Voting
Patricia Forbes Community Volunteer Voting
Hubie Jones City Year Voting
Ms. Jean Kanarian SMR Voting
Mr. Allan Kiser Fidelity Voting
Marjorie Malpiede Community Voting
Charlayne Murrell-Smith Boston Children's Museum Voting
Adam C. Powell IV Infinium Voting
Marjorie Ringrose Social Venture Partners, Boston Voting
Joel Sherman McLane, Graf, Raulerson & Middleton Voting
Mr. Wendell Taylor WilmerHale Voting
Mr. Philip A. Weitzel CohnReznick LLP Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $1,994,500.00
Projected Expense $1,939,617.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2015 BCC Audit Report

2014 BCC Audit Report

2013 BCC Audit Report

2012 BCC Audit Report

2011 BCC Audit Report

2010 BCC Audit Report

2009 BCC Audit Report

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $2,006,826 $1,852,637 $2,226,481
Total Expenses $2,023,359 $1,784,293 $2,173,018

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$886,488 $838,266 $1,094,054
Government Contributions $36,300 $11,000 $41,500
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $36,300 $11,000 $41,500
Individual Contributions $500,975 $444,599 $435,429
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $482,907 $315,853 $464,639
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,318 $1,700 $1,851
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- $100,000 --
Revenue In-Kind $90,226 $134,140 $184,866
Other $7,612 $7,079 $4,142

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $1,183,127 $947,621 $1,348,138
Administration Expense $367,488 $466,581 $481,544
Fundraising Expense $472,744 $370,091 $343,336
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.99 1.04 1.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses 58% 53% 62%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 33% 27% 22%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,239,584 $1,250,780 $1,357,724
Current Assets $1,062,860 $958,604 $999,838
Long-Term Liabilities $8,432 $11,726 $0
Current Liabilities $48,424 $39,793 $226,817
Total Net Assets $1,182,728 $1,199,261 $1,130,917

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 21.95 24.09 4.41

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 1% 1% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We are gearing up for the FY2016 Audit. 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials. 

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

 

The Boston Children’s Chorus (BCC) is an innovative music education organization that unites area children ages 7-18 across differences of race, religion and socioeconomic status, creating harmony both socially and through a shared love of music. We bridge Greater Boston’s many diverse groups and foster a sense of belonging, cultural awareness and social justice. Through intensive choral training and once-in-a-lifetime performing experiences locally, nationally and around the world, BCC enhances the education and social development of youth as culturally aware future leaders and global citizens in the 21st century. BCC has grown from a 20-singer pilot program in 2003 to serve over 450 youth who participate in 13 different choirs in five Boston locations.

BCC spent its first decade focused on establishing the artistic and educational integrity of the organization as we brought diverse youth from all over Greater Boston together. One of the beautiful things about the study of music is that there is no end point; there are always greater artistic heights to reach. With that said, we are proud that we have met, or exceeded, many of our most dearly-held hopes, accepting the President’s Committee Award at the White House in 2013 being one of the ultimate honors. Our singers were also honored to use their voices for healing following the 2013 Marathon tragedy, including the City-wide Interfaith Service and the One Year Remembrance Tribute attended by victims’ families, survivors, and national, state and city leaders, including President Obama, Governor Patrick, and Mayor Walsh. 

But BCC is much more than a choral program for youth. We have aggressively entered the race-relations and equity space as a social integration organization. These activities are not secondary to our arts work -- they are core to our day-to-day program and central to our mission. This past season, BCC successfully implemented the pilot phase of the Social Integration Initiative (SII), a social justice education program that integrates anti-bias and empathy training into our music education curriculum. Through this initiative, more than ever before, BCC is deeply embracing a unique approach to the difficult issues of racial and social inequities. Choirs have incorporated an array of social activities into weekly rehearsals, and each conductor has created a safe environment and space for age-appropriate conversations to flourish. Looking forward, with the help of thought partners and outside expertise, BCC will determine the primary impact it wants the program to have on its students and build an evaluation tool around this outcome with the ultimate goal of sharing its work with the community.

BCC’s ultimate goal is to become a well-capitalized institution that uniquely nurtures diverse youth as successful, global citizens and social change agents, contributing to a vibrant city. BCC believes that we will have succeeded when a community of students and alumni who have achieved mastery as singers and musicians has emerged that cuts across age, race, religion and social class, seeks out connections to each other, navigates through opportunities and challenges together, and uses their voices in song and speech for social change. This community will essentially form a “movement” that will link to and extend beyond the doors of BCC. We will also have succeeded when we can demonstrate that the arts can play a substantial role in addressing many of society’s ills.

 


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Bolstered by our achievements, BCC has ambitious plans that will endure well beyond this season. The following strategies and activities will help us meet the growing demand for the Choir Program; take our Social Integration Initiative to the next level; and ensure that BCC can achieve its goal of becoming a well-capitalized institution. 

  • Increase the number of singers, choirs and artistic staff. Due to emerging demand, we anticipate serving 485 singers this year. We are also implementing a Jr. Men’s Ensemble to accommodate the growing influx of adolescent boys newly accepted to BCC and those coming up through our system. This will better prepare them for the rigorous commitment of the senior Young Men’s Ensemble. Although there is a high artistic standard at BCC, 98% who audition are accepted. Singers need not have any previous musical training. And we actively recruit diverse youth from urban neighborhoods of Boston through a comprehensive marketing approach. 
  • Expand rehearsals, excursion and community service opportunities for more choirs. We are excited to raise the bar for more of our younger and developing singers by offering new opportunities and challenges: expanded rehearsal times, overnight excursions, higher profile performances, and community service projects. These activities foster independence and responsibility while boosting the singers’ confidence and comfort level as they interact with different communities and larger audiences. By expanding rehearsal times for two of our mid-level choirs we will increase their music mastery and their commitment to our social mission, preparing them for expanded performance opportunities in 2016-2017. Finally, in 2016, three choirs will perform in an opera trilogy at the Cutler Majestic Theater. They will prepare for this opportunity throughout the next 12 months.
  • Determine the primary outcome for the Social Integration Initiative. BCC will formalize the primary singer outcome we hope to see as a result of the SII implementation. Research has demonstrated that interracial and inter-class relationships break down stereotypes and bias (Allport’s Intergroup Contact Theory, 1954). Therefore, BCC believes that to have the greatest impact on social change, we must reduce prejudice and increase empathy and understanding among our diverse students by cultivating relationships among them – particularly among those who would not normally have met otherwise. To promote connections among our singers, we will focus on the perception of equal status in dialogue and activities; engage in working toward common goals (developing musical mastery and performance skills); negotiate cooperation within and among the choirs; and create and enforce supportive and safe norms.
  • Becoming a well-capitalized institution. Finally, to enhance sustainability, BCC’s critical strategic goals are to build our capacity for our major giving programs and to assess the organization for corporate sponsorship proposals. This past year, we have advanced our operational systems and laid solid groundwork that has helped us begin this journey, but to truly have a breakthrough in this area, we must expand our capacity so that we can identify additional major donors and corporate sponsors to increase our pipeline.

Key to achieving this goal is to hire a Director of Philanthropy. A search is underway and we anticipate hiring for this critical role by year end. This person will drive a development plan that will increase individual giving; pilot parent and alumni giving programs; engage in key donor visits; develop portfolios for 10 key Board and Development Committee members; and create stewardship plans for each segment of our highest level of donors and prospects.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

BCC is uniquely positioned to advance our twin missions of musical excellence and breaking down the silos in our communities through the strength of our internal resources:

· BCC draws a student body from metropolitan Boston and purposefully unites urban and suburban youth of different social and racial backgrounds in a way that transcends typical boundaries. At this point in the 2015-2016 season, over 450 singers have the following demographic breakdown: 26% Black, 39% White, 15% Latino, 11% Asian, 8% Multi-Racial, 1% Other. 76% female, 24% male. 33% are from families with household incomes of $45K or less.

· Anthony Trecek-King has served as Artistic Director of BCC since 2006 and now also serves as President, with support from Celeste Wilson, Managing Director and a core leadership team consisting of: Director of Choirs, Director of Programs, Director of Finance & Administration, and a Director of Philanthropy (to be identified). This is a strong management team that is ready to bring BCC’s programmatic impact to a higher level. Two BCC staff members are bi-lingual (Spanish, Mandarin/Cantonese) and were intentionally hired to help us with recruitment and build stronger relationships with our singers and their families.

· In addition, the creation of the full-time Director of Choirs position (previously a part-time Assistant Artistic Director role for Michele Adams) allows Trecek-King the time to strengthen his external standing in the City and enhance BCC’s visibility and brand locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. At the same time, Adams and other BCC artistic staff will be afforded a greater presence in the Boston Public Schools, further increasing BCC’s professional development work with teachers and impacting thousands of more students beyond BCC’s walls.

· BCC’s artistic leaders are regularly asked to apply their knowledge and expertise as conductors, clinicians, and presenters at various conferences and festivals throughout the country.

· BCC is led by a talented and committed 20-member Board of Directors, a racially and ethnically diverse group of leaders from Boston’s corporate, professional, community, religious, education and arts sectors. Two parents sit on the Board, and there are also non-Board community members and parents who sit on committees.

We also rely on our external partners, who are essential for advancing our work:

· Through BCC’s four neighborhood-based choirs, we partner with United South End Settlements, First Parish Church in Dorchester, the South Boston Perry K-8 School and the West End House Boys & Girls Club, organizations that serve urban Latino and African-American populations. These choirs draw ethnically diverse singers from local neighborhoods, and also draw singers from the suburbs into these communities. In addition, our partnerships with the New England Conservatory; Boston Public Schools Arts Office; music organization collaborators such as: Boston Symphony Orchestra, Boston’s Children’s Museum, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Rockport Music, plus many other for-profit and non-profit organizations who request BCC performances for their concerts and other events a) provide enriching educational and artistic experiences for our singers, b) enable BCC to extend its reach among diverse communities in Boston, and c) increase BCC’s visibility and reputation as well as support the organization’s rapid ascent as a key player in Boston’s landscape.

· BCC continues to work towards its vision of social change through local and national alliances and by building its presence as a thought leader in social justice integration and learning in the arts. BCC participates in the Boston Foundation’s Culture for Change cohort and the City of Boston, Boston Creates, which is creating a shared vision of arts and culture in Boston.

 


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

BCC rigorously evaluates all aspects of our program. We have developed a logic model through which we track our outcomes and indicators, based on our theory of change, inputs, activities, and the assets our singers bring to BCC. Our indicators of success include the following:

· Youth demonstrate proficiency in meeting national & state learning standards for singing and reading music, including memory and accuracy in learned repertoire, music and rhythm sight-singing & reading, matching and repeating pitch patterns, and range and quality of voice. 90% of our singers demonstrate advanced or proficient level of musicianship and performance skills.

· Singers increase their abilities as creative and confident leaders; team players; critical thinkers; and effective communicators. 90% of our singers display satisfactory or exemplary social and behavioral standards of maturity for their age level.

· Youth have deeper diverse cultural connections and identify themselves as advocates for social justice.

· Singers identify themselves as global citizens.

· BCC receives increased invitations to collaborate with Boston's professional artistic organizations.

To evaluate growth in our singers’ musical mastery, BCC has a comprehensive and sophisticated educational framework that maps out benchmarks in four skill areas for our four choir levels (Training, Intermediate, Advanced, and Premier). Four areas of social competence/work habits are also evaluated: maturity and responsiveness; interest and enthusiasm; physical engagement; and engagement with the audience.

Singers completing their second or third year in an ensemble typically progress to the next level ensemble. Our most recent evaluations revealed that, out of a total possible score of 100 on numerous measurements of music literacy, theory, maturity/behavior, performance skills, and attendance, singers across all choirs averaged 96.85.

As stated above, BCC will formalize the primary singer outcome we hope to see as a result of the Social Integration Initiative implementation this season. Then, we will be able to develop an appropriate tool to measure the outcome through ongoing evaluations, so that we can begin 2017-2018 with a solid baseline and procedures to determine how well we are doing, with the ultimate goal of replicating this groundbreaking work. Examples of how we may measure impact include tracking known friendships and connections throughout the season among singers; evaluating how equal status is perceived in each choir; and measuring how often and the process by which singers work together on a common goal. We will seek thought partners for this critical work as appropriate, and will share our results once our tool is developed.

Finally, we have implemented focus groups and a number of annual surveys for our singers, parents and audience members. All have provided useful information in improving our programs. In surveys, parents report high rates of satisfaction with their children’s experience; 98% say they would recommend BCC to a friend. And to date, over 100 singers have graduated from BCC; 100% of them graduated high school; and 100% went on, or are on track, to attend Ivy League and other colleges, conservatories and post-secondary programs such as City Year.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

 

BCC is proud of our success in creating a strong platform for musical achievement for hundreds of Greater Boston children of diverse backgrounds, regardless of their ability to pay. We look forward to continuing this life-changing work as we delve deeper into our mission of inspiring a vibrant Boston where folks are treated with respect, dignity and fairness regardless of differences.

Issues of race and inequity are very much in our consciousness given the recent and recurring events around the country, including Baltimore and Charleston. Our demographic research reveals that, though the City of Boston is becoming more diverse and is more than 50% of color, segregation persists. Nearly 70% of Black students and 68% of Hispanic students in the Boston metropolitan area attend majority-minority schools, while White students in the Boston metropolitan area attend schools where over 80% of their peers are also White (Ayscue & Greenberg, 2013).

Research shows that segregation impacts all students negatively, regardless of their race, ethnicity, or family income. At the same time, social science data has definitively shown social gains when students are in intentionally integrated environments: all students are less willing to accept stereotypes, and they learn to communicate and develop friendships across race and class lines (Crystal, Killen, & Ruck, 2008; Mickelson & Bottia, 2010; Pettigrew & Tropp, 2006).

BCC has learned that simply bringing diverse youth together in a safe space does not necessarily lead to the kind of bonding that leads to social integration. We have also discovered that culturally specific, neighborhood-based programming and targeted marketing is not enough to drive communities of color into our programs. Therefore, it is incumbent upon us to question and challenge these widely-held assumptions. Such assumptions only distract and prevent the arts and culture field from engaging in the meaningful work that could propel all of us forward. Furthermore, we have learned and recommend to our peers that institutions need to focus first on internal relationships by building cultural competency within, before building community externally.

In Fall 2014, BCC presented a 5-week pilot series of Dialogues on Race and Ethnicity facilitated by Paula Lima Jones of YW Boston. The 20 diverse BCC parents who volunteered to participate reported having extremely positive reactions to the experience. Taking part in this program gave them the opportunity to parallel the dialogues in which their children are engaged. We are thrilled to offer this program again this Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 (tentative) and look forward to building a cohort of parents who will drive change both within our organization and in the broader community.

In addition, over the next 1-2 years, BCC looks forward to beginning a longitudinal study of alumni so that we can better understand how our impact carries forward in our singers in the communities within which they become a part. We will use this data to inform our framework and share our outcomes with our partners.

Over the next three years, BCC, with key partners and supporters, will focus on creating a strong programmatic and organizational foundation that will enable us to move closer to realizing our vision and ultimately inspire others to join us in this journey of self-discovery, empathy and social change.