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Citizens For Safety, Inc. - LIPSTICK

 31 Heath Street, Suite 12
 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
[P] (617) 233-5363
[F] --
www.citizensforsafety.org
[email protected]
Nancy Robinson
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 2012
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 80-0380414

LAST UPDATED: 04/21/2016
Organization DBA LIPSTICK: Ladies Involved in Putting a Stop to Inner-City Killing
Former Names Massachusetts Against Trafficking Handguns (MATH) (2006)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Citizens for Safety (CFS) is a 501c3 nonprofit mobilizing the power of grassroots action to stop the flow of guns to criminals and create safe communities where every child can thrive without the fear of getting shot.
 
Operation LIPSTICK--Ladies Involved in Putting a Stop to Inner-City Killing--is a program of CFS that reduces the willingness of women to provide guns to people who can't get guns legally. LIPSTICK has been proven to reduce gun crimes by women.
 

Mission Statement

Citizens for Safety (CFS) is a 501c3 nonprofit mobilizing the power of grassroots action to stop the flow of guns to criminals and create safe communities where every child can thrive without the fear of getting shot.
 
Operation LIPSTICK--Ladies Involved in Putting a Stop to Inner-City Killing--is a program of CFS that reduces the willingness of women to provide guns to people who can't get guns legally. LIPSTICK has been proven to reduce gun crimes by women.
 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Dec 01, 2014 to Nov 30, 2015
Projected Income $170,000.00
Projected Expense $160,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • LIPSTICK: Ladies Involved in Putting a Stop to Inner-City Killings

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Citizens for Safety (CFS) is a 501c3 nonprofit mobilizing the power of grassroots action to stop the flow of guns to criminals and create safe communities where every child can thrive without the fear of getting shot.
 
Operation LIPSTICK--Ladies Involved in Putting a Stop to Inner-City Killing--is a program of CFS that reduces the willingness of women to provide guns to people who can't get guns legally. LIPSTICK has been proven to reduce gun crimes by women.
 

Background Statement

Citizens for Safety (CFS) formed in the early 1990s to reduce youth gun violence. CFS united civic and faith groups with police as part of the "Boston Miracle" that led to a 70% reduction in Boston gun crimes. CFS introduced the first gun buybacks in the country and took more than 3,000 guns off the street between 1996-98.

Revitalized in 2008, CFS became the first grassroots organization to reframe gun violence as a public health crisis and the first to focus on stopping gun trafficking. 

Introducing "Where did the gun come from?" campaign

In virtually every inner-city shooting, the gun was brought into the city illegally.  Citizens for Safety made "Where did the gun come from?" the key question. We urge residents need to demand an answer after every shooting.  

Q. Where do the guns come from? A. Women.

Introducing Operation LIPSTICK 

New research shows women play an outsized role in the marketplace for illegal guns. Firearms arrests of women in Boston increased 44% between 2011-2013. CFS launched Operation LIPSTICK to prevent women from being exploited as gun mules. LIPSTICK is a groundbreaking program of women's peer-to-peer education and empowerment, community organizing, and social service intervention to prevent women from being exploited to traffic guns to felons and minors. 

Suffolk County District Attorney says LIPSTICK is responsible for a 1/3 decline in gun cases involving women.


Impact Statement

  • LIPSTICK works. New research compiled by the District Attorney shows LIPSTICK is responsible for a 1/3 drop in gun crimes by women in Boston.
  • CFS programs recommended to White House as national best practice
  • In 2016, LIPSTICK won a competitive grant to be part of a panel discussion at a national criminal justice forum sponsored by the White House
  • Converted female straw gun buyers into LIPSTICK leaders, mentors and spokespeople
  • Stopped publication of classified ads commonly used by traffickers to smuggle firearms into Boston
  • Featured on CNN, NPR, Atlantic Monthly, New York Times, Boston Magazine, Boston Globe, NECN, Gawker, Cosmopolitan Magazine, more
  • Launched first mass transit public awareness campaign in the country to warn women of the consequences of straw buying guns

Goals:

1. Reduce the willingness of women to enable gun trafficking

2. Target high-risk young girls. Build self-esteem and resilience so they will not harbor guns for boyfriends

3. Offer skill-building workshops for females: public speaking, trauma reduction, using social media, advocacy, and more

4. Develop messages and clinical protocols to prevent women from providing guns used in crime

5. Expand network of informed and vocal female leaders to convince peers not to straw buy guns

 


Needs Statement

A new California study found that women are disproportionately involved in the sale of guns used in crime.Guns purchased by women are twice as likely to be used to commit crimes. [i] A Maryland study reports similar findings. A handgun purchased by a female is over 50% more likely than a gun purchased by a male to be later used in crime. [ii] Such findings suggest that that a female handgun purchaser is disproportionately likely to be acting as a “straw purchaser,” procured to buy guns on behalf of prohibited buyers. Criminal justice data published in the Washington Post confirms that young women living in urban centers are often exploited as straw buyers for boyfriends, husbands, and friends who can’t buy guns legally.[iii] According to the ATF, 50% of trafficking investigations involve a straw purchase.[iv] It is one of the most common ways guns are trafficked into urban neighborhoods where they are used in homicides and other violent crimes.

New data from the Suffolk County District Attorney, Boston Police Dept. and FBI Uniform Crime Report shows the number of females possessing firearms at the time of arrest in Boston has increased 44% between 2011 and 2013. The most frequent offense, ‘weapon law violations,’ doubled from 18 to 36 offenses during this time. This represents almost 1/3 (32%) of all arrests in 2013, up from only 23% of arrests in 2011.

CFS believes women and girls hold the key to a successful campaign against illegal guns. They are a clandestine source of guns for criminals, and are also an untapped resource in the fight against trafficking. Operation LIPSTICK serves especially hard-to-reach populations of women and girls who are among those most deeply affected by gun trafficking and the violence it fuels. The forums are the first to begin to examine the behavior of women who have operated in the shadows and may be coping with abuse, trauma, feelings of shame, drug addiction, poverty and other serious issues. These women may already be involved with social services and the criminal justice system. But we’re missing critical opportunities to address the causes and effects of illegal gun trafficking before someone is shot or goes to jail.

LIPSTICK connects these women with behavioral services, health services, law enforcement and elected officials and other public health and safety experts who can help prevent them from getting involved in illegal gun activity.


[i] Factors Affecting a Recently Purchased Handgun’s Risk for Use in Crime under Circumstances
That Suggest Gun Trafficking. Wintemute, Journal of Urban Health, 2010

[ii] Crime Gun Risk Factors: Buyer, Seller, Firearm, and Transaction Characteristics Associated with Gun Trafficking and Criminal Gun Use. Koper, Report to the National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, 2007

[iii] The Hidden Life of Guns. Fallis, “Washington Post, Oct.-Dec. 2010.

[iv] Following the Gun. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, 2000

The demand for LIPSTICK's trainings, tools and awareness campaign currently outstrips our capacity to deliver. For example, we receive an average of 10 requests per week for our workshops; current budget constraints allow us to fulfill only one of these requests. 
 
LIPSTICK's most pressing need is for funding to support the initiatives below. 
1. Workshops and educational events. LIPSTICK's workshops are catalysts for community action. Increased funding will allow us to hold additional workshops for at-risk women and girls and support them to organize post-workshop actions in the community. Examples of post-workshop actions include organizing Beauty Day events in local nail and hair salons to offer discounted services while educating patrons on the risks and consequences of illegal gun activity. Estimate cost: $1,500 per workshop, $1,500 per Beauty Day event. Total annual budget: $30,000
 
2. Clinical guidelines. Clinicians, social workers, domestic violence counselors, etc. are missing critical opportunities to talk with women about the risks of trafficking guns for men. LIPSTICK will create the first protocols in the country to identify and treat at-risk women. Estimate: $40,000
 
3. Research into the risk factors and opportunities for early intervention that would help prevent women from being exploited as gun traffickers.
Estimate: $25,000 
 
4. Expand LIPSTICK's train-the-trainer model for domestic violence and homeless shelters, schools, prisons, churches, and other venues where we can reach women in Boston and beyond. $3,000 per workshop; $50,000 per year (includes curriculum, activist toolkit, volunteer stipends)
 
5. Disseminate LIPSTICK's "His Crime--Your Time" message throughout public housing venues in Boston and beyond. Estimate: $5,000 per housing site. Total annual cost: $30,000 (includes materials, workshops and leadership trainings, organizing time)
 

CEO Statement

The dirty little secret of urban gun violence is that women are supplying the guns. Women are easy prey for gun traffickers just as they're easy prey for sex traffickers and drug traffickers. Vulnerable women are often used to make a "straw buy," purchasing firearms for men who can't pass criminal background checks.  

LIPSTICK is the first program in the country to address this problem and get results. The District Attorney says LIPSTICK contributed to a significant drop in gun prosecutions involving women.
 
LIPSTICK is changing social norms that say it's acceptable to buy, hide or carry guns for men. When a man tells a woman, "buy this gun for me," she will say no. When he says, “hide this gun for me,” she’ll know that would be enabling violence and risks going to jail. When he says “you’d do it if you loved me,” she’ll know that’s not what love looks like. LIPSTICK gives women the information, peer support, tools, strength, and confidence to make the right choice and help others do the same.

Board Chair Statement

I became involved in CFS because I was horrified by the steady stream of gun homicides occurring in cities across the country.  As an African American business leader, I wanted to apply my experiences and business knowledge in ways that would make a difference for young African American children growing up in today's urban centers.  CFS has the right leadership, messages and approach.  Unfortunately, we work in a challenging political environment, and are coming on the heels of many years of legislative failures and setbacks.  CFS offers a fresh approach and innovative, non-legislative solutions that take time to click with high-level partners and funders.  I am increasingly confident in CFS' ability to change the conversation about guns and crime in a meaningful, profound and lasting way. 

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Urban neighborhoods throughout the U.S. 

Organization Categories

  1. Public Safety, Disaster Preparedness and Relief - Alliances & Advocacy
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Leadership Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

LIPSTICK: Ladies Involved in Putting a Stop to Inner-City Killings

Where do crime guns come from? Increasingly, the answer is women. Emerging research, and anecdotal evidence compiled by CFS and Mayors Against Illegal Guns, shows women and girls enable gun traffickers by buying, smuggling and hiding guns for felons and minors who can't pass background checks. Astonishingly, no one has addressed this problem—until now.

CFS partnered with the US Department of Justice, Massachusetts Department of Public Safety, Harvard School of Public Health, and Boston’s Project RIGHT to launch LIPSTICK. LIPSTICK the first focus groups, counseling protocols, educational workshops and community actions in the country to prevent women from providing guns used in crime. We are the first to document women’s stories, feature positive role models and spokespeople, and educate women and girls about the dangers of buying, hiding and holding guns illegally.

New research shows LIPSTICK works. Boston's District Attorney says LIPSTICK contributed to a 1/3 drop in gun crimes by women in 2013-14.
Budget  $150,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served At-Risk Populations Females Females
Program Short-Term Success  Short-term success: train women leaders to conduct Traffick Jam Leadership Trainings for their peers and provide online and grassroots organizing tools for women to spread messages and awareness
Program Long-Term Success 
Long-term success:  change social norms so that women make the right choice not to traffic in illegal guns, and help other women do the same
 
At the campaign’s conclusion, Boston will have an expanding network of educated, active, engaged, and vocal female leaders who are key partners with law enforcement to reduce violence committed with trafficked guns. They will lead peer-to-peer education, outreach, community organizing, and grassroots and social media strategies to raise consciousness, recruit friends and neighbors, change accepted norms, and build a robust coalition to advocate for policy reforms. The project will also yield new research on the nature, scope and prevalence of straw purchasing by women, and produce the first guidelines for service providers to protect women from being exploited as straw purchasers. 
 
Program Success Monitored By  Law enforcement data, workshop evaluations, surveys, focus groups and meetings with stakeholders, partners, funders, program participants, and members of targeted populations
Examples of Program Success  Gun cases involving women drop; women trainees take the initiative to spread messages and awareness to their coworkers, friends, family and neighbors.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Unique LIPSTICK benefits: 

  • Impacts a common source of guns used in crimes--women straw buyers
  • Avoids polarizing political debate
  • Based on proven models of social change
  • Doesn't require Congressional action
  • Engages, empowers and mobilizes most-affected populations
  • Strengthens outcomes for other violence-prevention efforts 
  • Yields groundbreaking research to inform public policy
  • Develops replicable best practices, strategies and protocols
  • Engages the domestic violence and public health communities in the fight to curb gun trafficking
 
 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Nancy Robinson
CEO Term Start Jan 2008
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Executive Director Nancy Robinson has more than 10 years' experience in nonprofit management and community organizing. Ms. Robinson is a trained educator and writer. In 2004, she toured the country, meeting survivors, activists and local leaders in more than 50 cities. She served on the National States Presidents Council and created gun violence prevention tools, programs and messages currently in use in five states. 
 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Kim Odom Field Director Kim Odom is a recognized faith and civic leader in the Boston community. She was voted on of the most powerful and influential Boston leaders by Boston Magazine in 2014. 
Ruth Rollins Program Director Trained domestic violence women's advocate with more than 10 years' experience

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Women's Empowerment Boston Boys and Girls Clubs 2015
Youth Leadership Greater Love Tabernacle Church 2010

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

U.S. Dept. of Justice 
Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security
Suffolk County District Attorney 
Harvard School of Public Health
Boston's Project RIGHT  
Casa Myrna
Rosie's Place
Elizabeth Stone House
Louis D. Brown Peace Institute 
Massachusetts League of Women Voters
Boys and Girls Club
Black Ministerial Alliance
Boston Ten Point Coalition
+ 40 more 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 6
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 5
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No Quarterly
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Gregory King
Board Chair Company Affiliation Kingbridge Consulting
Board Chair Term Jan 2012 - Jan 2016
Board Co-Chair Michael Reinhorn
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Newton-Wellesley Hospital
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2013 - Jan 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Laura Ahart Boston Ten Point Coalition Voting
Paul Barrett Equity Residential Voting
David Chipman ShotSpotter Technologies Voting
Robert Francis Law Enforcement Consultant for MassHousing Voting
Courtney Grey Boston Public Health Commission Voting
David Hemenway Harvard School of Public Health Voting
Gregory King Kingbridge Consulting Group Voting
Jorge Martinez Project RIGHT Voting
Ayanna Pressley Boston City Council Voting
Michael Reinhorn Newton-Wellesley Hospital Voting
Nancy Robinson Citizens for Safety Voting
Robert Sege Boston Medical NonVoting
Mary Vriniotis Harvard School of Public Health NonVoting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Shante Leathers LIPSTICK Voting

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
William Dickerson Greater Love Tabernacle Church NonVoting
Michael Dukakis former Massachusetts Governor NonVoting
Gordon Martin New England School of Law NonVoting
John Rosenthal Stop Handgun Violence --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 4
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 50%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We are privileged to have a diverse, highly skilled, and dedicated board who are thought leaders and experts in research and public policy, law enforcement, community organizing, public health, and business.   

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Dec 01, 2014 to Nov 30, 2015
Projected Income $170,000.00
Projected Expense $160,000.00
Form 990s

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

Audit Documents

2011 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $42,694 $61,984 $81,792
Total Expenses $58,813 $68,597 $83,073

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $42,690 $61,980 $81,786
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $4 $4 $6
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $55,290 $66,397 $83,073
Administration Expense $3,523 $2,200 --
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.73 0.90 0.98
Program Expense/Total Expenses 94% 97% 100%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $9,658 $25,777 $32,390
Current Assets $9,658 $25,777 $32,390
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $9,658 $25,777 $32,390

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990-EZs. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note, for fiscal year 2013, an amended 990 file is posted above, as the nonprofit worked with its preparer to correctly attribute its program related expenses, to the program service expense category.
 
This organization’s exempt status was automatically revoked on December 10, 2012 for failure to file a Form 990 / 990EZ / 990N / 990PF for three consecutive years. This organization’s Ruling Date of June 2014, in the above posted IRS Letter of Determination, indicates that the IRS subsequently accepted an application for exemption and has issued a new letter of determination.
 

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

LIPSTICK contributed to a 1/3 drop in firearms cases involving women in Boston. Women living, working, and raising families in low-income, high-crime communities will tell you gun violence prevention is a top priority, higher even than access to health care or good jobs. They want the shootings to stop. They don’t want to be gripped with anxiety and fear every time their children leave their sight. They don’t want to have to go to another funeral, shudder every time they hear a gunshot or siren, or console their grieving sisters, mothers and daughters. Urban gun violence—much of which is committed with illegally trafficked handguns—is deeply personal for these women. It’s the difference between whether they get to celebrate their child’s 21st birthday in person or standing over a grave.

It’s no surprise that women and girls in urban communities are profoundly affected by gun violence. What’s surprising is that they’re also a major, and, in many cases, unwitting contributor to the problem.

New research shows women arm “impact players”— juveniles and felons responsible for much of the shooting in urban communities. These women may be coerced, bribed, or sweet-talked. Or they may be simply unaware that they could be contributing to someone’s death, lose their housing, or go to jail. One woman is capable of putting hundreds of guns on the streets.

Operation LIPSTICK transforms her from being part of the problem to being part of the solution. Women, it turns out, hold the key to stopping neighborhood gun violence. And they can do it with one great defining, defiant act—by refusing to buy, hide or hold guns for people who can’t get guns legally.

LIPSTICK’s mission is to change the culture among women in inner-city communities that says it's acceptable to buy, smuggle or conceal guns for men who can’t get guns legally. When a man tells a woman, "buy this gun for me," she will say no. When he says, “hide this gun for me,” she’ll know she would be enabling violence and risks going to jail. When he says “you’d do it if you loved me,” she’ll know that’s not what love looks like. LIPSTICK gives women the knowledge, peer support, tools, resolve and confidence to make the right choice, and help others do the same. Through LIPSTICK, women who have found a way out are showing others the way out.

 

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

LIPSTICK is a groundbreaking women's program of peer-to-peer education and empowerment, community organizing, and social service intervention to prevent women from being exploited to buy, hide, or smuggle crime guns. Core education and organizing strategies:
 
A. Public educational workshops, presentations and forums for high-crime neighborhoods to educate women about the serious risks and consequences of engaging in illegal gun activity
 
B. Leadership trainings for workshop graduates. These are skill-building workshops on public speaking, community organizing, social media organizing, advocacy, trauma reduction and more to increase LIPSTICK's scope, visibility and capacity to impact the problem.
 
C. “His Crime Your Time” public awareness campaign for mass transit, public housing and other venues. It's the first of its kind to run on municipal mass transit and has been shown to reduce high-risk behaviors among women and girls.
 
D. Research & protocol development to give domestic violence counselors, social workers, and other service providers the tools to identify and treat women at risk of being exploited as gun traffickers. There are currently no guidelines in place to address women at risk of gun trafficking. LIPSTICK will provide the first protocols in the country and make them available to service providers nationwide.
 
E. Community organizing actions include beauty salon educational events, pledge drives, social media mobile education tools, more. One beauty day event in 2014 educated 300 female community residents in 2 hours. Women are pampered while they learn how to save lives. Pledge drives have resulted in 3,000 plus signatures of women vowing not to buy or smuggle guns illegally. Studies show people who take pledges are more likely to keep them. 
 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

CFS is has a long track record of launching innovative public health and safety solutions.  CFS' programs have been recommended to the White House as national best practices, received multiple local awards and featured by national media.  
 
1990s
CFS launched the first gun buybacks in the country. Buybacks have removed tens of thousands of crime guns from inner-city neighborhoods. 
 
2009-2012
CFS partnered with the ATF and City of Boston to create "Traffick Jams," the first civilian trainings on gun trafficking sources and solutions.
 
2012
CFS became the first organization in the country to focus on preventing women from supplying crime guns. 
 
LIPSTICK tools and endorsements
LIPSTICK trainings are based on an award - winning educational curriculum developed by CFS in partnership with the ATF, City of Boston, BPD and Boston community organizations. LIPSTICK has been endorsed by Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, BPD, Harvard School of Public Health, Suffolk County District Attorney, NYPD Commissioner William Bratton, NY Police Foundation, and more than 60 Boston-based community organizations. 
Board members include one of the country's preeminent thought leaders on gun violence prevention-HSPH Professor David Hemenway, Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley, a former ATF agent, and business and faith leaders.
 
LIPSTICK Field Director, Kim Odom, was named one of Boston's most powerful people by Boston Magazine. Other staff members include experts in domestic violence treatment and prevention, community organizing and marketing and communications.   

“Experienced offenders have no qualms about using young women to carry, store and even obtain their weapons through straw purchases. And this is where LIPSTICK comes in—by educating women, particularly young women, and empowering them to say I’m not going to do the time for your crime. I’ve seen that social forces like peer pressure can really change people’s behavior. That’s why I’ve been a supporter of LIPSTICK from Day One.” Suffolk County DA Dan Conley

"LIPSTICK is a new initiative that reduces the willingness of women to engage in straw purchases using peer-to-peer education. As women have helped reduce drunk driving, they can mobilize to reduce firearm violence.  
 --David Hemenway, Director, Harvard Injury Research Control Center and Citizens for Safety Board member  
 

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

LIPSTICK will creat an expanding network of educated, active, engaged, and vocal female leaders in Boston who are key partners with policymakers to reduce violence committed with illegally trafficked guns. They will be trained to lead peer-to-peer education, advocacy, and grassroots and social media organizing to raise consciousness, recruit friends and neighbors, change accepted norms, and build a robust coalition to advocate for reforms. The project will also yield groundbreaking insights and information on the nature, scope and prevalence of illegal gun activity by women.
 
We will measure progress in Phase I of the work by tracking the following:
 
Goal #1:Increase the number of residents, especially women, who hear the message that the trafficking of illegal guns, including straw purchasing, is a major problem. Track pledge signatures, database growth, workshop and event attendance, community partners, and media coverage.
 
Goal #2: Increase the number of people/leaders working to solve the problem. Track number of LIPSTICK Ladies, social media activity, requests for workshops, presentations and materials, Iron Pipeline™ demonstrations, and the number of people who help plan LIPSTICK events, gather pledge signatures, share personal stories, and disseminate LIPSTICK messages.
 

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Accomplishments
 
“LIPSTICK is a new initiative that reduces the willingness of women to engage in straw purchases using peer-to-peer education. As women have helped reduce drunk driving, they can mobilize to reduce firearm violence.” David Hemenway, Director, Harvard Injury Research Control Center and Citizens for Safety Board member.
 
We are organizing an army of informed, civically engaged women and girls to change the way crime guns move into and around their community. LIPSTICK breaks cycles of exploitation and violence, empowers new leaders, changes accepted norms for the next generation, and prevents thousands of guns from getting into the wrong hands.
 
Through LIPSTICK, young girls convince their friends to say no when a boyfriend asks them to hide a gun. Mothers and grandmothers vow to no longer store guns in the home illegally. Women refuse to fill out the paperwork at gun stores and gun shows for men who can’t pass criminal background checks. This is the new normal.
 
The best testament to LIPSTICK’s impact comes from its scores of volunteer leaders, the majority of whom are victims and survivors of gun violence and domestic abuse.“LIPSTICK Ladies” have made the campaign a part of who they are and what they do. They're flexing muscles they didn’t know they had. Using LIPSTICK’s tools, they’re rallying their peers, opinion leaders, policymakers, law enforcement officials and the media around a common agenda to keep guns out of the wrong hands. They’re testifying at legislative hearings, organizing pledge drives and beauty salon educational events, and spreading LIPSTICK’s uplifting message online and throughout the community.
 
One of the original LIPSTICK Ladies organized a Gospel retreat that featured the LIPSTICK campaign. Another leader, a college student, raised money to produce a video about LIPSTICK for her social network. A domestic violence counselor incorporates LIPSTICK in her work with survivors. A Mary Kay representative spreads LIPSTICK’s message and recruits new volunteers as she goes door-to-door selling cosmetics. A former gun smuggler shares her story with the media to warn young girls not to follow in her footsteps. Teenage girls now working with LIPSTICK said they refused to carry their boyfriends’ guns as a result of seeing our ad on the MBTA.
 
Impact
  •  Suffolk County District Attorney credits LIPSTICK with a 1/3 decline in gun crimes by women 2013-14.
  • Trained hundreds of community residents in Massachusetts through workshops and events
 
  • 95% of workshop attendees will sign LIPSTICK pledge not to buy, hide or hold guns illegally (studies show that people who sign pledges are more likely to keep them)
 
  • 95% of workshop attendees say they learned something new about crime gun sources
 
  • 85% of workshop graduates sign up to stay involved in the campaign
 
  • Converted dozens of former straw gun buyers into LIPSTICK leaders
 
  • Doubled database of supporters including community residents and leaders, elected officials, law enforcement and more
 
  • Deputized 50+ leaders, mentors and spokespeople in 6 months
 
  • Reached thousands of Americans through mainstream and social media with coverage in CNN, NPR, Boston Globe, Boston Magazine, NECN, Atlantic Monthly, Gawker, Cosmopolitan Magazine, the Journal of the American Medical Association and more.
 
On the Horizon
 
Service Provider Counseling Guidelines Social service providers across the country interact with tens of thousands of women every day who are at risk of being exploited by gun traffickers. But there are no guidelines in place on how to recognize or counsel these women. Consequently, they are missing key opportunities to protect women and girls and prevent them from being exploited to straw buy and smuggle guns.
 
LIPSTICK seeks to develop first-of-its-kind assessment and intervention protocols for domestic violence counselors, social workers, and medical professionals. The protocols will be made available to service providers nationwide to prevent vulnerable women from buying, hiding or carrying illegal guns. The protocols will include insights into the best ways to communicate anti-gun trafficking messages to targeted populations and engage women’s advocates as leaders in the fight to reduce gun trafficking.