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Salem Academy Charter School Foundation (Salem Foundation for Service Education Inc.)

 45 Congress Street, c/o Salem Academy Charter School
 Salem, MA 01970
[P] (978) 744-2105
[F] (978) 744-7246
www.salemacademycs.org
[email protected]
Sean O’Neil
INCORPORATED: 2003
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 83-0368169

LAST UPDATED: 07/09/2015
Organization DBA Salem Academy Charter School
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Salem Foundation for Service Education is a supporting organization and related party to Salem Academy Charter School. Salem Academy Charter School is a small commonwealth charter school serving the diverse population of Salem and the surrounding communities with a college preparatory program for students in grades six through twelve.   As an independent public school, Salem Academy is tuition free and open to all as space allows. Through a unique integration of college preparatory classes with service to the community, the school graduates informed, articulate and proactive individuals of strong character.

 

Salem Academy prides itself on a strong school culture defining the school as a learning community where students and adults interact with mutual respect and who collectively value the school’s norms embodied in the acronym REACH – Responsible – Empathetic – Assertive – Cooperative – Honest.

 

Salem Academy’s goal is to set high standards and expectations, and to raise students’ aspirations. We believe that with structure, support, and consistency, every student can become a successful learner. Our essential vision is for any student who chooses to come here, regardless of social, ethnic, or economic background, to find academic success and to develop the skills, the habits of mind, the attitudes, the strength of character, and the sense of civic responsibility to become successful in college and to become an active and constructive participant in an adult society. 

Mission Statement

The Salem Foundation for Service Education is a supporting organization and related party to Salem Academy Charter School. Salem Academy Charter School is a small commonwealth charter school serving the diverse population of Salem and the surrounding communities with a college preparatory program for students in grades six through twelve.   As an independent public school, Salem Academy is tuition free and open to all as space allows. Through a unique integration of college preparatory classes with service to the community, the school graduates informed, articulate and proactive individuals of strong character.

 

Salem Academy prides itself on a strong school culture defining the school as a learning community where students and adults interact with mutual respect and who collectively value the school’s norms embodied in the acronym REACH – Responsible – Empathetic – Assertive – Cooperative – Honest.

 

Salem Academy’s goal is to set high standards and expectations, and to raise students’ aspirations. We believe that with structure, support, and consistency, every student can become a successful learner. Our essential vision is for any student who chooses to come here, regardless of social, ethnic, or economic background, to find academic success and to develop the skills, the habits of mind, the attitudes, the strength of character, and the sense of civic responsibility to become successful in college and to become an active and constructive participant in an adult society. 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $4,640,018.00
Projected Expense $4,593,174.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Academic Success
  • Faculty and Staff
  • MMSI-APTAP
  • Service Learning

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Salem Foundation for Service Education is a supporting organization and related party to Salem Academy Charter School. Salem Academy Charter School is a small commonwealth charter school serving the diverse population of Salem and the surrounding communities with a college preparatory program for students in grades six through twelve.   As an independent public school, Salem Academy is tuition free and open to all as space allows. Through a unique integration of college preparatory classes with service to the community, the school graduates informed, articulate and proactive individuals of strong character.

 

Salem Academy prides itself on a strong school culture defining the school as a learning community where students and adults interact with mutual respect and who collectively value the school’s norms embodied in the acronym REACH – Responsible – Empathetic – Assertive – Cooperative – Honest.

 

Salem Academy’s goal is to set high standards and expectations, and to raise students’ aspirations. We believe that with structure, support, and consistency, every student can become a successful learner. Our essential vision is for any student who chooses to come here, regardless of social, ethnic, or economic background, to find academic success and to develop the skills, the habits of mind, the attitudes, the strength of character, and the sense of civic responsibility to become successful in college and to become an active and constructive participant in an adult society. 


Background Statement

Salem Academy Charter School is an independent public school chartered by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education in 2003 and opened for the 2004-2005 school year in Salem, Massachusetts.  The school was founded by Rachel Hunt, a graduate of Wesleyan, Harvard Graduate School of Education, and the state’s Building Excellent Schools program. Ms. Hunt had taught Spanish in Costa Rica, spent a year as Deputy Director of WorldTeach there training and placing teachers globally, and then taught for two years at the Collins Middle School in Salem. Recognizing the severity of need for the traditionally underserved population of this small urban center, Ms. Hunt gathered a team of area professionals who shared her concern and her vision for a new school. This would be a school that would be grounded in the best available current educational research. It would embrace children from all walks of life, set high expectations, provide all necessary support, and give proof to the belief that every child can succeed.

 

Widely known as the site of the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692, Salem is a colorful, coastal city with much to offer - a culturally diverse population, a rich maritime heritage, an impressive display of historic architecture, and amazing stories that span almost four centuries. Salem has a population of 40,000 in an area of only eight square miles.  There are 4,400 students enrolled in the district schools. With eight elementary schools, and until recently, only one middle school and one high school in the district, Salem Academy provides the opportunity for a choice of public schools at the middle and high school levels in the city. Salem Academy occupies a 35,000 square foot building at Shetland Park, a waterfront industrial and commercial complex flanked on one side by the residential Point Neighborhood and on the other side by the tourist attractions of Pickering Wharf, the historic downtown area, and the more affluent residential area, all an easy walking distance for many students. 

 

The 2012-2013 school year is Salem Academy’s ninth year of operation. Admission is open to all, non-selective, non-discriminatory, and tuition free. Having opened with 88 students in grades six and seven the first year, the school has grown to 340 students in grades six through twelve. Demographics include: 34% Hispanic, 12% African American; and 5% Asian; 24% of our students’ first languages are not English; Salem Academy is a School Wide Title I school with 42% low income students; 15% of our students are enrolled in special education. In the past four years, 100% of our graduates have been accepted at an impressive list of colleges and universities including American, Barnard, Bates, Bucknell, Clark, Endicott, Gordon, Goucher, Ithaca, Northeastern, Regis, Salem State, Simmons, Syracuse, U. Mass Amherst, UNH, UVM, and WPI. Many of the school’s graduates are the first in their families to go to college. 


Impact Statement

Salem Academy Charter School serves the same demographic population as the Salem Public Schools. Salem is a Level Four District; Salem High School and Collins Middle School are Level Three Schools, among the lowest 20% performing schools in the state. Salem Academy Charter School has grown from 88 students in 2004 to 340 students in 2012 and will serve its maximum allowed enrollment of 372 students in the fall of 2013. In the lottery for the current year’s enrollment, there were 285candidates for 90 spaces. On average, Salem Academy students historically have scored ten points higher than Salem district students on MCAS exams in every subject at every grade level. 70% of Salem Academy juniors and seniors are enrolled in at least one Advanced Placement class. 100% of Salem Academy Charter School graduates have been accepted at two or four year colleges.

 

Within the past year:

·         The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education declared Salem Academy Charter School a Level I school.

·         Boston Magazine ranked Salem Academy Charter School as the number one charter school among 22 Boston area charters.

·         The Boston Globe featured Salem Academy as one of the top MCAS performing charter schools in the Boston suburbs.

·         Newsweek Magazine ranked Salem Academy Charter School number 499 among “The Top 1,000 High Schools in America”.

·          The Washington Post ranked Salem Academy Charter School among the top ten high schools in the state in the Post’s Challenge Index.

·         The Governor of Massachusetts declared Salem Academy Charter School a Commended School for growth in student performance and for closing the achievement gap.

 


Needs Statement

A.     Capacity Building

Salem Academy Charter School has achieved measurable results with limited funds and facilities largely due to the entrepreneurial spirit, energy, and dedication of a talented and selfless staff. As the school has grown from the “start-up” stage to become an established and respected institution, it can no longer depend on the largess of its employees to ensure sustainability. Salem Academy needs funds to accommodate the increase from 340 to 372 students. It needs funds to employ more learning specialists to work closely with students ensuring the support that each child needs to reach the goals of a personal student success plan. It needs funds to reward talented teachers and to become competitive in the educational marketplace for teachers and leaders alike. It needs funds to employ support personnel who will enable teachers to do what they do best and not lose time and energy to mundane tasks. And it needs funds to expand the schools facilities and equip the facilities properly ensuring the school’s ability to provide an environment that supports the school’s mission. These are capacity building needs enhancing the school’s ability to realize its goals and become sustainable. In the current year’s budget, the gap between state funded tuition and the actual cost per student is $1,500.

 

B.     Professional Development

In keeping with the school’s founding philosophy of research based best practices in education, Salem Academy Charter School is committed to ongoing professional development programming for its teachers and administrators. The school sponsors a five day orientation / training session for new staff every summer followed by another five days of professional development activities for the entire staff before classes begin in late August. While classes are in session until 4:00 pm Monday through Thursday, classes end at 2:00 pm on Friday every week, and the faculty engages in a two hour professional development workshop every Friday afternoon throughout the school year. Periodically, the school supports a team based approach to professional development enabling members of an academic department or a task force to take class time off for an of campus workshop. In addition, five half days are scheduled each year for focused professional development workshops, and the year concludes with a full day of programming typically the last weekday of June. 

 

In recent years, Salem Academy has brought specialists and consultants to the school for targeted programs on service learning, standards based instruction and assessment, and English language learner instruction. Salem Academy engages the Achievement Network consulting firm to support teachers in using data to inform curriculum design and instructional strategies. Salem Academy also supports faculty participation in workshops, conferences, and graduate courses to the degree possible, and the school maintains membership in the Salem State University Collaborative Project, a source of excellent and timely training sessions on a variety of subjects including especially the effective application of technology in teaching. The current budget for this program is $42,000; however, only $20,000 is allocated in the school’s state funded budget and the remaining $22,000 is dependant each year on philanthropic support.

 

C.     Service Learning

Service learning is an essential element of the school’s mission. Student engagement in service learning enhances students’ understandings of academic content by practical application, addresses the school’s mission based goal of character development, provides opportunities for teamwork and leadership, and contributes to the long term goal of citizenship. The service learning program is administered by the Head of School and implemented by the entire teaching staff. Service learning programming, approximately 100 hours a year, is scheduled into the 195 day school year. Selected half days and full days are devoted to service learning. An effective service learning program for a team of 18 to 20 students is equivalent to another course for a teacher. This increases the average teaching load from four classes to five for most teachers in addition to their Connections

(homeroom) classes and supervisory responsibilities, and it adds an element of responsibility where many teachers feel a lack of expertise. 

 

Salem Academy seeks to improve the service learning program by designating a person who would take on the administrative leadership as a significant percentage of his or job description. In addition, the service learning program by its nature depends on partnerships with community based organizations, and so a goal for this program is to transfer the prime responsibility for planning, implementation, and student engagement from the classroom teachers to specialists who represent the participating community organizations. A budget to support these improvements in the program would be in the range of $60,000.

 

D.     Facilities

Salem Academy Charter School leases a 35,000 square foot facility in Shetland Park, an industrial / commercial complex on Salem Harbor. Recently renovated, the school building is modest but well equipped for the current student population with sufficient classrooms, laboratories, offices, a learning common (library/technology center), and cafeteria. As the school’s enrollment grows, however, more space will be needed for additional classrooms and particularly for studios that will support art, music, dance, and drama programs. The most urgent need, however, is for a gymnasium.   As the school has grown, particularly from a middle school to a full middle school and high school, the athletic and physical education programs have grown, and the school has had ever increasing needs for gymnasium space. For the first few years, students walked a mile to the Salem YMCA to use a gym there, but that facility is no longer available. More recently, Salem Academy has enjoyed a relationship with the Salem Boys’ and Girls’ Club a short, two block walk from the school, and students have been able to use the gym there until 2:00 pm each day when the Club needs the space for its own programs. This has accommodated Salem Academy’s physical education program but has forced the basketball teams to travel to nearby towns for rented gym space. Now, the Boys’ and Girls’ Club’s facility is at risk of renovation for another purpose, and Salem Academy is searching for new options. 

 

Fortunately, additional space contiguous to Salem Academy’s current building is available for potential expansion. In the near term, Salem Academy’s facilities priority is to build a new gymnasium, most likely in the currently available space or elsewhere on the Shetland Park grounds. Further expansion of the school building space would then follow after the gymnasium as the school’s enrollment grows. The estimated cost of a new gymnasium is $2.5 million. As a charter school in an area targeted for economic development, Salem Academy is eligible for favorable tax exempt bond financing and so the school’s need now, at minimum, is for the first 10% of that cost, $250,000.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

NORTHEAST REGION, MA

Salem Academy Charter School's primary sending district is the City of Salem.  80% of the school's students are from Salem.  Additional students come from East Boston, Lynn, Saugus, Peabody, Marblehead, and Beverly.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Charter Schools
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Academic Success

Salem Academy Charter School’s highest priority is academic achievement leading to success in college. Toward that end, Salem Academy offers a well defined curriculum, good teaching, and a school culture that supports learning. 

Salem Academy offers a standards based, college preparatory curriculum. Every student takes math, science, English Language Arts, history or social studies, and with few exceptions, Spanish. In addition, students take multiple electives in art, music, dance, drama, health, physical education, and technology. The school supports an extended day and an extended year. There are 195 days in the school year. Classes begin at 8:30 a.m. and continue to 4:00 p.m. followed by homework center, tutoring, and a variety of activities and athletics until 5:30 p.m. ELA, math classes, and most lab sciences are 80 minutes in length; other classes are 54 minutes. Multiple levels of each discipline and multiage groupings allow the school to respond to students’ individual learning styles, levels of skill, and achievement. The curriculum is grounded in the Massachusetts Common Core Curriculum Frameworks, and student progress is purely performance based measured by internal and external assessments. 

Teachers hold students to high academic expectations in every classroom. Instruction is standards-based and daily objectives are derived from established benchmarks for each academic core course. In order to ensure that students master lesson objectives, standard lessons open with an introduction, include direct instruction or modeling, guided practice, and time for independent application of skills prior to conclusion of the lesson. This format may be spread over the course of more than one instructional period. Instruction in every class is supported by the use of technology. Salem Academy has invested in personal laptops for every teacher, SMART Boards in nearly every classroom, multiple laptop carts, and netbooks for our upper classmen.

Budget  $2,500,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Education Policy Programs
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 
In the first four graduating classes so far, 100% of graduates have been accepted at colleges.
Program Long-Term Success 
100% of graduates will be accepted at colleges.
Program Success Monitored By 
Success is measured by documented graduation rates and college acceptance documents.
Examples of Program Success 
In the school's first few years, there were insufficient candidates from Salem to fill all available spaces, and the attrition rate from 8th grade was 40%.  In 2012, there were 285 candidates for 90 spaces; 100 of new students, other than siblings, were from Salem, and the attrition rate from 8th grade was 20%.

Faculty and Staff

Salem Academy Charter School believes that the adult professional staff members are at the core of the school’s success. Salem Academy seeks teachers who have expertise in their subject matter, who care deeply about young people and believe in their students’ ability to succeed, who are team players, and who have an entrepreneurial spirit that supports determination, persistence, and creativity in their efforts to create a highly personalized education for every student. Multiple levels of delegated authority empower teachers to have a voice in the daily life of the school and to effect change. The staff is not unionized; contracts are for one year at a time; professional development programming is continuous throughout the school year, and the school employs a clearly defined teacher evaluation system. 

The student teacher ratio is 10:1. One hundred percent of teachers are highly qualified by NCLB standards; 67% have advanced degrees; average teaching experience is 8 years.  

Budget  $2,500,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Teacher & Faculty
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 
Salem Academy Charter School is fortunate to have a team of 5o on staff who share a sense of comaraderie and pride in accomplishment as evidenced by being named a Level One school and by Boston Magazine as the best charter school in the Boston area.
Program Long-Term Success 
The long term success of the school will depend on the school's enduring committment to attract and retin the best possible teachers available.
Program Success Monitored By 
Salem Academy administers a mid-year staff satisfaction survey every year and then asks faculty in the spring to consider their idea job description for the following year.  This provides a structure for discussions intended to draw on teachers greatest strengths as the school plans for the next year.  Ultimately, the faculty attrition rate offers the most concrete data, and the school has been fortunate to reduce the rate to an average of 10% in recent years.
Examples of Program Success 
The average teacher's salary at Salem Academy Charter School is $48,000 for a person with eight years experience and a master's degree.  Most teachers here could easily earn $10,000 more at a district school.  While Salem Academy needs to address the compensation issue, it is clear that within reason, job satisfaction for teachers is derived more from personal satisfaction and fulfillment than from compensation.

MMSI-APTAP

Salem Academy is participating in the Massachusetts Math and Science Initiative Advanced Placement Training and Award Program (APTAP). The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in partnership with Mass Insight Education and Research Institute, secured one of the first grants from the National Math and Science Initiative, Inc. (NMSI) for this program. The goal is to increase student enrollment in mathematics, science and English AP courses, as well as to improve student performance  as reflected by an increase in the number of qualifying scores. The program provides extensive training for AP and Pre-AP teachers, establishes AP lead teachers, demands additional student preparation, and provides performance-based financial incentives for students and teachers. It focuses on teacher and student support, vertical teaming, open enrollment, and incentives.  The program increases the number of students taking AP exams, and expands access to traditionally under-represented students. 

Budget  $10,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

As a result of this program, 60% of students in the Class of 2010 and 78.6% of students in the Class of 2011 earned qualifying scores on at least one AP exam. In 2011 and again in 2012, Salem Academy was ranked among the top twelve high schools in the state in the Washington Post’s Challenge Index, a measure of effectiveness in preparing students for college.   This year, 70% of students in Salem Academy’s grades 11 and 12 are enrolled in a least one Advanced Placement course.

Program Long-Term Success 
The MMSI-APTAP program raises expectations for students and teachers and will lead to a population of more skilled teachers and better educated students.
Program Success Monitored By 
The succes of the MMSI-APTAP program is well documented by the percentages of stuidents taking AP courses and by the their qualifying scores.
Examples of Program Success 
One example of the results of the MMSI-APTAP program is a recent graduate from an ethinic minority, low income family, who despite modest acadmic success in 9th and 10th grades became motivited by this program to take AP courses, earned qualifying scores in three of four subjects in two years, and earned a full four year scholarship to the college of his choice. 

Service Learning

Service Learning allows students to apply their learning in context. Students spend 100 hours of school time each year on service learning projects. Younger students participate in thematically oriented teams while older students pursue independent or small group projects of their own design. Through the Five Step Process students identify an issue, research the issue, develop a strategy for addressing the issue, implement the strategy, and evaluate the results.

Each year the sixth grade focuses on housing and food. Their service learning experiences are woven into the curriculum and include a Hunger Banquet, a partnership with Heifer International, and a visit to a farm. The seventh and eighth grades choose their projects within a theme, and ninth and tenth grade students choose a mini-project each quarter. This allows the students to learn how to research and solve problems  before completing an independent service learning project and thesis in eleventh and twelfth grade.

Budget  $4,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Service Learning
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 
Service Learning contributes to character development, provides opportunity for teamwork and leadership, and helps students understand the relationship between academic content and its practical application.
Program Long-Term Success 
Service Learning leads to responsibile adult citizenship.
Program Success Monitored By 
Student surveys consistently identify service learning programs among students' most valued experiences during their tenure here.
Examples of Program Success 

Independent individual projects, such as a recent graduate’s anti-bullying project, are where students take ownership of the Five Step Process and make an issue their own. This student’s choice to take up the cause of bullying has lasted well beyond her time at Salem Academy. The non-profit organization she founded, Stand Up, Speak Out: On A Mission to End Bullying, features a webpage with over 30,000 views, a Facebook page with over 6,000 likes, and a Twitter feed with almost 400 followers. Her organization aims to educate children and adults about bullying and its effects and to encourage those who are suffering from bullying. In recognition of her work, she was invited to attend Lady Gaga’s launch event for the Born This Way Foundation at Harvard last spring, and her project continues to make a difference in the lives of others each day. Service learning combines meaningful service in the community with high academic standards and structured reflection. 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Salem Academy Charter School is currently implementing the new Educator Evaluation Framework sponsored by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, a system that will draw direct correlations between student performance and teacher performance, and this will raise new issues with respect to teacher compensation.  Four years ago, Salem Academy introduced a system of slary increments for longevity at the school in an attempt to remain competitive and retain talented teachers.  Salem Academy already has begun giving stipends through the MMSI-APTAP program to AP teachers whose students earn qualifying scores on the AP exams, and this year Salem Academy is using Title IIA Teacher Quality funds to award bonuses to teachers whose students met high benchmarks on MCAS exams. While attracting and retaining top quality teachers is one of Salem Academy’s highest priorities, the issue of teacher compensation, particularly in relation to student performance, will become a pressing, complicated, and ultimately expensive issue.  Short term increments, stipends, or bonuses may generate short term benefits, but the issue will become sustainability.  Charter schools cannot depend on the generosity of dedicated teachers to bear the burden of limited budgets and expanded programs.  This is our greatest challenge.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Sean D. O'Neil
CEO Term Start July 2006
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

 Sean O’Neil is Executive Director of Salem Academy Charter School.  Mr. O’Neil holds a BS in Business Administration from Rider University and a Master of Arts in Teaching English from the University of Notre Dame.   He has held a variety of teaching and administrative positions in independent and charter public schools including teacher, Development Director , and Assistant Headmaster at Lawrence Academy at Groton, Headmaster of the Chapel hill Chauncy Hall School in Waltham, Development Director at Cambridge School of Weston, and Executive Director of the Cape Cod Lighthouse Charter School.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Stephanie Callahan Head of Lower School --
Ms. Rachel Hunt Head of School --
Ms. Chyna Onembo Dean of Students --
Ms. Linda St. Pierre Special Education Coordinator --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Best Charter School in Boston Boston Magazine 2012
Level One status Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary education 2012
Top 1,000 Hugh Schools in America Newsweek Magazine 2012
Top Ten High Schools in Massachusetts Washington Post 2012
Commended School Massachusetts Governor's Office 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Massachusetts Department of Early and Secondary Education (Mass DESE) 2009

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 48
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 32
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 16%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 43
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 36
Male: 14
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Peter Copelas
Board Chair Company Affiliation Peter's laundry
Board Chair Term Jan 2013 - Dec 2013
Board Co-Chair Mr. John Jermyn
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation American Express
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Joshua Biber Teach for America Voting
Ms. Constance Burke New England Institute of Art Voting
Mr. Peter Copelas Peter's laundry Voting
Dr. Alyce Davis Salem State University Voting
Ms. Kate DiGangi Attorney Voting
Mr. John Jermyn American Express Voting
Ms. Paige Nalipinski Massachusetts General Hospital Voting
Dr. Emily O'Brien Massachusetts General Hospital Voting
Ms. Leslie Tuttle Tuttle & Company --
Mr. Alex Vasquez Wheaton College Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 20%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • --
  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Campus Planning and Development
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Education
  • Finance
  • Human Resources / Personnel

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $5,195,864 $4,044,610 $3,753,714
Total Expenses $4,972,175 $4,134,644 $4,561,113

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$317,192 $227,149 $229,832
Government Contributions $4,305,105 $3,750,371 $3,611,384
    Federal $179,947 $186,616 $242,308
    State $4,125,158 $3,563,755 $3,369,076
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $491,532 $47 $-197,865
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $77,330 $59,677 $79,318
Investment Income, Net of Losses $708 $442 $1,037
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- $23,932
Revenue In-Kind -- -- $4,400
Other $3,997 $6,924 $1,676

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $4,049,921 $3,468,123 $3,770,630
Administration Expense $917,889 $666,168 $765,275
Fundraising Expense $4,365 $353 $25,208
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.04 0.98 0.82
Program Expense/Total Expenses 81% 84% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $949,450 $902,382 $583,680
Current Assets $553,407 $742,258 $394,940
Long-Term Liabilities $426,224 $196,828 $223,136
Current Liabilities $385,717 $791,734 $356,690
Total Net Assets $137,509 $-86,180 $3,854

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value $0.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.43 0.94 1.11

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 45% 22% 38%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Salem Academy Charter School suffered a financial setback in FY 2011 when the Department of Education discovered errors in the sending district's calculation of per student expenses midyear and reduced this school's tution income by 8%, $250,000.  With a full complement of students and faculty under contract, there was little that could be done to prevent a serious deficit in that year's budget.  Salem Academy then established an austere budget for the FY 2012 year and closed the year with a $14,000 deficit before depreciation on a $4 million budget.  The school is again solvent and this year is working with a cautiously conservative budget that includes contingency and surplus funds.  While shortage of cash flow has been the most challenging element of the FY11 shortfall, Salem Academy has enjoyed the support of several philanthropic foundations and the flexibility provided by Beverly Cooperative Bank.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials and reflect both the charter school and its foundation.  For fiscal year 2011, the summary column of the 2012 audit was used, non-operating revenue was edited to include the total of the items listed.  The breakout of functional expenses is per the organization.
 
Please note, during 2013 the organization changed its fiscal year end from December 31 to June 30 to coincide with the fiscal year of the charter school. As such, a six month Form 990 covering Jan. 1, 2013 – June, 30, 2013 is posted above.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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