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Esperanza Academy Inc.

 198 Garden Street
 Lawrence, MA 01840
[P] (978) 686-4673
[F] --
www.esperanzaacademy.org
[email protected]
Allison Caffrey
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INCORPORATED: 2004
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 73-1722348

LAST UPDATED: 02/10/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Esperanza Academy is a tuition-free, independent middle school in the Episcopal tradition welcoming girls of diverse faiths, race, and cultures from Lawrence, Massachusetts. The school inspires students to become active learners and responsible global citizens. We empower and prepare our girls to meet challenges with courage, integrity, and respect. 

Mission Statement

Esperanza Academy is a tuition-free, independent middle school in the Episcopal tradition welcoming girls of diverse faiths, race, and cultures from Lawrence, Massachusetts. The school inspires students to become active learners and responsible global citizens. We empower and prepare our girls to meet challenges with courage, integrity, and respect. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $2,018,000.00
Projected Expense $1,988,050.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Extended Day Program
  • Graduate Support Program
  • Summer STEAM Program
  • Wellness Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Esperanza Academy is a tuition-free, independent middle school in the Episcopal tradition welcoming girls of diverse faiths, race, and cultures from Lawrence, Massachusetts. The school inspires students to become active learners and responsible global citizens. We empower and prepare our girls to meet challenges with courage, integrity, and respect. 

Background Statement

Esperanza Academy was founded by a group of volunteers who believed that they could close the achievement gap between girls from Lawrence and their peers in more affluent surrounding areas by providing a transformative middle school education. The school started serving its first fifth and sixth grade students in September 2006, and reached full enrollment in September 2008. Since opening its doors, the school has added a mandatory athletics program, an in-house chef who provides healthy meals and snacks for students and faculty, a social worker to help students and families navigate challenges, and a graduate support program to help students succeed through high school and college. In July 2015, Esperanza Academy earned full accreditation from the Association of Independent Schools in New England (AISNE), a nationally recognized accreditation program. Esperanza enrolls 60 students in grades five through eight and supports 130 high school and college-aged alumnae. Admission is done through a lottery to ensure that all girls in Lawrence have an equal opportunity to access the exceptional education provided by the school.

Esperanza Academy consists of two distinct, but overlapping programs – the middle school and the Graduate Support Program. In our middle school program, the school year includes the summer term and the regular academic year, and all programming is mandatory. The summer term consists of a four week, on-campus, STEAM-intensive academic program, and a week-long, sleep-away, outdoor education and leadership development program at a camp in New Hampshire. The academic year runs for 11 months and includes 9.5 hours of daily programming. In addition to academics, students spend two hours per afternoon participating in athletics, study hall, and clubs. Through our Graduate Support Program, Esperanza works with our students to research high schools, apply for financial aid, practice for entrance exams, and practice mock admissions interviews. Once students are in high school, we stay in close contact to monitor performance, and help the students and their families navigate the college application process.


Impact Statement

Esperanza makes a 12-year commitment to our girls; educating them in grades 5-8 and continuing to work with them in high school and college through our Graduate Support Program. 

  • Esperanza has been extremely successful in its efforts to prepare our students to thrive after graduation: 100% of graduates have completed high school and 100% of alumnae in high school are on track to graduate on time. 80% of high school graduates are enrolled in college and on track to graduate.
  • Esperanza’s alumnae are awarded over one million dollars per year in scholarship money to attend some of the region’s most prestigious independent high schools, including Phillips Academy, Phillips Exeter Academy, Brooks School, Groton School, Kimball Union Academy, and Pingree School, among others.
  • In 2016, Esperanza launched a highly successful summer STEAM program, where students participated in an intensive summer program including one week at a camp in New Hampshire, and four weeks on campus engaged in humanities and hands-on STEAM projects.
  • Looking to the future, we will continue to serve our girls with our excellent holistic programming, 9.5 hours a day, 11 months a year. We acknowledge the abundance of challenges that our girls face, and are committed to providing a transformative education at a pivotal point in their lives, since middle school is often recognized as the "last best chance" to put students on a path to achieving their full potential.

Needs Statement

Esperanza Academy is 100% privately funded and relies on the generosity of its donors to be able to provide our girls with our exceptional, holistic programming. All our students are residents of Lawrence, MA and live at or under 185% of the federal poverty line, which means they qualify for free or reduced price lunch under the National School Lunch Program. 90% speak a language other than English at home and 70% live with a single parent or guardian. Our student population is largely comprised of first and second-generation immigrants from Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Almost all students will be the first in their families to attend and graduate from college, and some are even the first to attend or graduate from high school.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
All students must reside in Lawrence, Massachusetts.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Primary & Elementary Schools
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Extended Day Program

Students are in school for 9.5 hours per day, 11 months per year. Our rigorous academic program includes the core subjects of math, history, science, language arts, and reading. Students also take Spanish language and literature, and world religion classes. Our 8:1 student-teacher ratio ensures that each student receives significant individualized attention. All classes are team-taught by an experienced teacher and an AmeriCorps teaching fellow. Additionally, we have a committed group of volunteer tutors who provide extra help to students who need it. The extended day also includes supervised study hall, athletics, and extracurricular clubs.

Budget  $145,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Hispanic, Latino Heritage Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

In the short term, we expect that every student will average two years of academic growth for every year at Esperanza. Our extended school year, small classes, individualized attention, and rigorous tutoring program help our students thrive academically and graduated prepared for high school and college. 

Program Long-Term Success 

As a lottery-based school welcoming students with a wide range of cognitive abilities, our definition of success is different for each student. Many of our students arrive at Esperanza one to three grade levels behind where they should be academically. That being said, we strive to create a college-bound culture that permeates all programming, and we expect and prepare each student to graduate from high school and pursue post-secondary education - either a two or four-year college, or a job training program. 

Program Success Monitored By 

MAPS tests are administered throughout the year, and teachers use a program called Jupiter Grades to track student progress in real time – and this information is accessible by students, parents, and administrators. We will also continue to track and measure programmatic success through the percentage of students who graduate from high school, the percentage of students who enroll in college, and the percentage of students who graduate from high school.

Examples of Program Success 

Students demonstrate tremendous academic gains during their time at Esperanza, often advancing many grade levels past where they started. Our holistic programming gives our girls opportunities to try new things, challenge themselves and take risks, and learn valuable leadership and self-advocacy skills. Students graduate from Esperanza supported and prepared to achieve success in high school, college, and beyond.


Graduate Support Program

Through our Graduate Support Program, Esperanza makes a twelve-year commitment to students, educating them in grades five through eight and supporting them through high school and college. Our graduate support program starts working with girls early in their Esperanza career, and creates a college-bound culture that permeates all aspects. Through our Graduate Support Program, Esperanza works with our students to research high schools, apply for financial aid, practice for entrance exams, and practice mock admissions interviews. Once students are in high school, we stay in close contact to monitor performance, and help the students and their families navigate the college application process.

Budget  $200,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Education, General/Other
Population Served Hispanic, Latino Heritage College Aged (18-26 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

In the short term, we expect and prepare each student to graduate from Esperanza ready to attend their best-fit high school. Our Graduate Support Program gives students and families the deep and ongoing support to guide them through the high school application and financial aid process and leave Esperanza ready for the rigors of high school. 

Program Long-Term Success 

In the long term, we expect all our students to graduate from high school on time, find their best-fit college/post-secondary school option, and be prepared for success. Research has shown that the type of wraparound services we provide can have a tremendous impact on the college persistence and graduation rates for first-generation students. We strive to provide the academic, emotional, and social support to help our students thrive during and after their time at Esperanza.

 

Program Success Monitored By 

The graduate support team gets releases from all high school-aged alumnae to interact with their school as a parent would. As such, Esperanza receives all report cards, communicates with advisors, and visits students on campus. The graduate support team maintains a database that tracks student progress and achievement, including grades, honor roll status, whether students are failing or close to failing a class, what types of activities and athletics they participate in, and data on the school themselves that the graduates attend. Regular meetings with graduates also allows for qualitative accounts of their feelings about their high school and college experiences. The graduate support staff maintains continuous contact with alumnae to ensure they are making progress towards their goals.

Examples of Program Success 

The program has maintained a 100% high school graduation rate and an 85% college enrollment rate, which are major accomplishments in a city with a 60% high school graduation rate and 46% college enrollment rate. 80% of our alumnae who have enrolled in college are still in school and on track to earn their degrees. 75% of Esperanza graduates earn admission and full scholarships to attend highly competitive independent boarding and day schools, and earn over $1,000,000 in scholarships each year.


Summer STEAM Program

In 2016, Esperanza launched an innovative, project-based, hands-on STEAM program. The summer program is broken into two parts: a week at an all-girls overnight camp in New Hampshire and four weeks on campus at Esperanza in Lawrence. The week at camp is spent on leadership development and team building, outdoor education, and traditional camp activities. On campus, students focus on humanities in the morning and work on their STEAM projects in the afternoon. Projects include computer science, engineering, ecology, and jewelry-making with recycled materials. Each grade works on a different project in a different STEAM subject and at the end of the program, Esperanza hosts a showcase in which the students present their findings and finished products.
Budget  $160,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

Our short term goals are to increase interest in science, math, and technology, and to increase student proficiency and progress in STEM-related subjects, specifically math and science. We will measure these goals through a year-to-year comparison of student grades in each subject as well as standardized test scores. As we continue past our pilot year, we will be able to compare science and math test scores from year to year to see if the STEAM projects conducted in the summer program improved overall progress and proficiency in those subjects. Our goal is to see increased test scores each year in these subjects, and for teachers to notice increased math and science comprehension in the classroom.

Program Long-Term Success 
The long-term goal of the program is to increase the number of students who successfully pursue careers in STEM fields. We believe that this program has the potential to create the next generation of scientists, doctors, engineers, programmers, and mathematicians. As part of our mission to break the cycle of poverty through education, our goal is to expand the horizons of professional ambitions for our students. This program will open their eyes to a whole new world of possibilities. Esperanza’s Graduate Support Program tracks alumnae through high school and college so we will be able to gather data on the majors/careers that our graduates pursue.
 
Program Success Monitored By 

We use a combination of qualitative and quantitative measures to evaluate the effectiveness of our summer program. Last summer we conducted an intensive debrief with all faculty to gather feedback on what worked, what needed improvement, and new ideas for next year. We also solicited feedback from the students. Later this year we will be able to compare science and math grades and test scores from last year to this year to measure any increases in student progress for math and science.

Examples of Program Success 

Last year’s summer program was extremely successful. Students were excited and engaged, and the projects exhibited at the showcase were very impressive. Last year we were also able to hire 10 graduates to work as camp counselors and one to be a teaching assistant for the on-campus STEAM projects. Anecdotally, we have seen incredible strides in our girls’ self-confidence and leadership development that has transitioned from the summer program to the academic year.


Wellness Program

Esperanza’s Wellness Program takes a multidisciplinary approach to incorporating physical fitness and health education into each school day, and includes a mandatory athletics program, healthy and nutritious school meals and snacks, cooking workshops for families, and a daily advisory period where students can discuss in- and out-of-school issues in a safe space. This program helps students understand the importance of a healthy lifestyle in achieving success both in and out of the classroom. Esperanza empowers students to both make healthy choices and to understand why these choices are important, which will serve them in their experiences during and after Esperanza.
Budget  $150,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Females
Program Short-Term Success  In the short term, we expect our students to demonstrate growth and improvement in terms of self-confidence, leadership, sportsmanship, and maturity. 
Program Long-Term Success  By improving our students’ physical health through nutritious, healthy meals and rigorous weekly exercise, and by giving them the tools to deal with challenging social and emotional situations, we are helping to set them and their families up for success during and after graduation from Esperanza. 
Program Success Monitored By  Health indicators for the city of Lawrence are alarming; 47% of students are overweight, 12% of Latino residents have diabetes, and 51% of teen girls get pregnant. Esperanza’s Wellness Program is designed to upend these trends and ensure that our students do not become another statistic. To measure the impact of this program, we conduct frequent debriefs and assessments with our students to get feedback, and our school social worker works closely with students and families to ensure that they are healthy, safe, and secure. We also track our alumnae as they progress through high school and college. This includes frequent check-ins to gauge the emotional and social well-being of our alumnae, monitoring of grades, and tracking of their athletic participation.
Examples of Program Success  A restructuring of our parent engagement program has seen increased numbers of parent and family involvement with student life at Esperanza, including at our cooking workshops. In addition, our athletic program continues to thrive, with strong partnerships with other local independent schools and record numbers of students on our varsity sports teams. Also, by restructuring our Advisory program so that students have this time daily, we have seen significant increases in our girls' well-being.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Lynne Myavec
CEO Term Start July 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience


Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Annmarie Quezada Principal --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Association of Independent Schools of New England --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 17
Number of Part Time Staff 11
Number of Volunteers 150
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 90%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 22
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 22
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Marty Doggett
Board Chair Company Affiliation The Governor's Academy
Board Chair Term July 2015 - June 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
The Rev. Joanna Barrett Rector, Trinity Episcopal Church --
George Bixby Retired, Former owner and treasurer Malcolm Technologies Voting
Denise Bordonaro Esq. Commercial Real Estate Attorney Voting
Linda Borland Executive Recruiter Life Insurance/Financial Service Industry Voting
Yeng Butler State Street Global Advisors --
Susan Casey Elementary School Teacher Lawrence Public Schools Voting
Marty Doggett Headmaster Emeritus The Governor's Academy Voting
Dianne Domenech Burgos Director Math & Science for Minority Students Phillips Academy Voting
Christine Dwyer The Dwyer Foundation Voting
Ian Gracey Director of Admissions Groton School Voting
Michael Helman Co-Owner Shawsheen Village Liquors Voting
Pete Lara United States Property and Fiscal Office --
Kate Morris Fidelity Investments --
Sarah Newton Community Volunteer --
Marvin Nyman Business and Tax Consultant --
Cathy Perron Eaton Professor/ Director Boston University Voting
Diane C Pinakiewicz MBA, CPPS Principal DCP Consulting LLC Voting
Winnie Swan Esq. Sr. Vice President/General Counsel NxStage Medical Inc. Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 16
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 11
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Building
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Education
  • Finance
  • Investment
  • Marketing
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
  • Trusteeship

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $2,018,000.00
Projected Expense $1,988,050.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

Audit Documents

2016 EA Financial Statement Audits

2015 EA Financial Statement Audits

2014 EA Financial Statement Audits

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,576,349 $1,490,299 $2,683,049
Total Expenses $1,982,514 $1,660,621 $1,540,286

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $51,177 $55,317 $54,371
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $51,177 $55,317 $54,371
Individual Contributions $1,332,890 $1,216,460 $2,372,377
Indirect Public Support -- $0 --
Earned Revenue $16,849 $22,378 $20,739
Investment Income, Net of Losses $26,480 $10,081 $9,041
Membership Dues -- $0 --
Special Events $148,953 $176,830 $177,038
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $9,233 $49,483

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,436,899 $1,270,769 $1,184,719
Administration Expense $203,653 $128,555 $120,032
Fundraising Expense $341,962 $261,297 $235,535
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.80 0.90 1.74
Program Expense/Total Expenses 72% 77% 77%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 22% 18% 9%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $3,131,747 $3,469,099 $3,651,001
Current Assets $640,137 $1,599,991 $1,737,692
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $78,271 $36,077 $45,318
Total Net Assets $3,053,476 $3,433,022 $3,605,683

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 8.18 44.35 38.34

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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