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Playworks New England

 67 Kemble Street Suite 3.6
 Boston, MA 02119
[P] (617) 708-1734
[F] (617) 849-5791
http://www.playworks.org/ne
[email protected]
Jonathan Gay
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INCORPORATED: 1996
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 94-3251867

LAST UPDATED: 10/20/2017
Organization DBA 501 (c)(3)
Playworks Education Energized
Former Names Playworks Massachusetts (2016)
Playworks Metro Boston (2012)
Sports4Kids (2009)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Playworks’ mission is to improve the health and well-being of children, and enhance their education, by increasing opportunities for safe, meaningful play. Playworks transforms the playground into an unconventional classroom designed to foster social skills, improve student’s ability to focus, decrease behavioral problems and promote student leadership.

 
The 2017-2018 school year marks the 11th year of Playworks New England, energizing education for 60,000 students across Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island. Since our launch in 2006, we have grown from 7 to 120 elementary schools, been recognized as a Social Innovator by Root Cause’s Social Innovation Forum and recently selected as a 2012 EdVestors finalist for building strong school communities through improving school climate.

Mission Statement

Playworks’ mission is to improve the health and well-being of children, and enhance their education, by increasing opportunities for safe, meaningful play. Playworks transforms the playground into an unconventional classroom designed to foster social skills, improve student’s ability to focus, decrease behavioral problems and promote student leadership.

 
The 2017-2018 school year marks the 11th year of Playworks New England, energizing education for 60,000 students across Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island. Since our launch in 2006, we have grown from 7 to 120 elementary schools, been recognized as a Social Innovator by Root Cause’s Social Innovation Forum and recently selected as a 2012 EdVestors finalist for building strong school communities through improving school climate.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $2,883,006.00
Projected Expense $2,883,006.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Direct Services to Low income schools
  • Training and Technical Support

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Playworks’ mission is to improve the health and well-being of children, and enhance their education, by increasing opportunities for safe, meaningful play. Playworks transforms the playground into an unconventional classroom designed to foster social skills, improve student’s ability to focus, decrease behavioral problems and promote student leadership.

 
The 2017-2018 school year marks the 11th year of Playworks New England, energizing education for 60,000 students across Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island. Since our launch in 2006, we have grown from 7 to 120 elementary schools, been recognized as a Social Innovator by Root Cause’s Social Innovation Forum and recently selected as a 2012 EdVestors finalist for building strong school communities through improving school climate.

Background Statement

In order to explain how far Playworks has come and what we’ve learned along the way, it is important to understand our modest beginning. In 1996, Jill Vialet, Playworks Founder and CEO, was visiting an elementary school principal when a teacher burst into the room with a couple of harried looking boys who had gotten into a skirmish on the playground. Exasperated, the principal looked at Jill and said, “Can’t you do something for these boys? They are in here everyday!” And after thinking about it for a bit, Jill decided that yes, she could do something. Jill remembered a helpful and caring adult from her childhood who had helped her get “into the game” with other kids on playgrounds and recreation centers in her hometown of Washington, DC. So that idea became what is now Playworks.

For the last 21 years, Playworks has been positively impacting children’s health and well-being by harnessing the power of play during recess and throughout the school day, creating valuable opportunities for children to grow physically, emotionally, and socially. A first-of-its-kind nationwide Gallup Poll of school principals conducted in 2009 revealed that principals overwhelmingly believe recess has a positive impact on student’s social skills, as well as achievement and learning in the classroom. However, the poll also found that many schools cut recess to meet testing requirements, many schools continue to take recess away as a punishment for bad behavior, and due to the multiple challenges that recess presents—schools are looking for help.

Playworks began operating in two public schools in Berkeley, California in 1996. Since that time, it has grown to serve in 22 communities nationwide in low-income elementary schools and youth organizations. Locally, Playworks serves 120 schools throughout Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island, energizing education for 65,000 students. An independent randomized control trial conducted in 2013, found that Playworks programming improves school climate, reduces bullying and increase student engagement in school through play and physical activity.

 


Impact Statement

Independent studies verify that Playworks dramatically reduces bullying at our partner schools, increases time for teaching, and inspires students to behave better both at recess and in class. In 2013, Stanford University and Mathematica Policy Research released results of a randomized control study of Playworks. This level of evaluation is considered the gold standard for research. Several findings were found to be statistically significant indicating the impact did not happen by chance but was a result of our programming:

  1. Playworks schools have less bullying and exclusionary behavior – compared to teachers in control schools, a 43% difference in average rating scores.

  2. Students at Playworks schools receive more daily physical activity and the vigor of activity increases (14% versus 10% of recess time, a 43% difference).

  3. Teachers in Playworks schools gain valuable instructional time – last year teachers in New England reported spending significantly less time transitioning from recess to learning activities (34% fewer minutes) gaining on average 20 hours teaching time.


To measure impact, Playworks collects survey data from teachers, principals, and students who participate in the program. Our New New England 2016-2017 teacher and principal data indicates that:

Physical Activity Increases:

  • 98% report an increase in the number of students engaged in healthy play.

  • 98% report an increase in intensity of physical activity during recess.

School Climate Improves:

  • 96% agree that Playworks improves overall school climamte

  • 95% report an increase in level of cooperation among students during recess.

Recover Learning Time:

  • 90% report a reduction in the amount of time transitioning from recess to classroom instruction, reclaiming 18 hours of teaching time over the course of the school year.

  • 94% report an increase in the students’ ability to focus on class activities.


Needs Statement

Our top 3 needs for the 2017-2018 school year:

  •  Program Coordinators - This year we will have 32 full-time professionally trained program coordinators, or coaches, in 45 schools across Boston, Brockton, and Cambridge providing Playworks programming for an entire school year. Coaches know the names of each student in school, greet students with a smile and high-five and encourage safe, positive behavior amongst students. The cost of one coach is $15,000
  • Non-Competitive Sports League - This year we will host a Co-Ed Volleyball League in November and a Girls' Basketball League in March. Leagues last seven weeks and are free and non-competitive for our students. Both leagues get approximately 550 students participants and league nights are truly a community night. The cost of one team for leagues is $5,000.

  • Junior Coach Leadership Program - This year we will have 500 4th and 5th grade students enrolled in our Junior Coach Leadership Program. Each Junior Coach will receive 100 hours of training on leadership development, teamwork, conflict resolution and peer negotiation.  Additionally this year we will be launching our Junior Coach Transition Project, helping Junior Coaches manage the stressful transition to middle school. The cost of one Junior Coach is $1,000.

CEO Statement

Playworks’ vision is that one day, every child in America will have access to safe, healthy play every day. Play creates essential opportunities for children to explore their imaginations, to connect with other people and to stretch and grow physically, emotionally and socially.

Our experience is that diminishing opportunities for unsupervised play in our society have left kids with a very thin understanding of how to manage their own play and that it is important to have grown-ups introduce some basic rules to make play work.

Playworks builds the culture of play at a school so that kids feel safe and included. This means that soccer games aren't running through four-square games, for instance. We also introduce games that encourage kids themselves to take ever-increasing responsibility for the quality of play and for each other. Ultimately our unique brand of play fosters greater independence and leadership among children.

Our experience at Playworks shows us that play creates an important opportunity to teach kids conflict resolution skills. In particular, we are huge fans of rock-paper-scissors. Building a play culture that acknowledges the arbitrariness of most conflicts and provides a simple, playful tool for addressing them, ultimately makes it easier for kids to recognize and address more serious conflicts.

We also believe that there is value in having grown-ups play alongside of children.  A grown-up standing on the sidelines barking instructions only serves to perpetuate the less-than-playful status quo. But when adults get in the game and actually play themselves, it introduces an important element of silliness and shared humanity, making the play more accessible, and helping children feel safer and more connected.

Playworks incorporates competitive activities into its programming, but strives to do it in a developmentally appropriate way. One amazing thing about play is this: kids’ desire to keep the activity going will motivate them to take actions that are actually in the best interest of the larger group. Most often this manifests as self-handicapping: switching players, adapting the rules, etc. to keep some balance and ensure that everyone is having enough fun to continue playing. In short, play works!


 


Board Chair Statement



Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Massachusetts-All Regions
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE

Playworks will energize education for 60,000 students from 120 primarily low-income elementary schools during the 2017-2018 school year.

Coach Schools

Boston:

Allston: Gardner Pilot Academy

Brighton: Thomas A. Edison K-8 School, Winship Elementary School

Dorchester: Conservatory Lab Charter School, Dr. William W. Henderson Inclusion School, Martin Luther King Jr. K-8 School, Neighborhood House Charter School, Oliver Wendell Holmes Elementary School, Richard J. Murphy Elementary School, Sarah Greenwood Elementary School, Thomas J. Kenny Elementary School, William Monroe Trotter Elementary School

Hyde Park: Match Community Day Charter Public School

Jamaica Plain: Boston Teachers Union Pilot School, James W. Hennigan Elementary School, John F. Kennedy School, Joseph P. Manning Elementary School, Mary E. Curley School

Mattapan: James J. Chittick School

North End: Eliot K-8 Innovation School

Roxbury: David A. Ellis Elementary School, Ellis Mendell Elementary School, Maurice J. Tobin K-8 School, Orchard Gardens K-8 School

Lawrence: Francis M. Leahy School, Robert Frost Elementary School

TeamUp Schools

Boston: Boston Green Academy, Boston Renaissance Charter Public School, Charles Sumner Elementary School, Codman Academy Charter School, Dennis C. Haley Pilot School, Dever Elementary School, Donald McKay K-8 School, Hugh R. O’Donnell Elementary School, Higginson/Lewis K-8 School, John Winthrop Elementary School, Joyce Kilmer Elementary School, Michael J. Perkins Elementary School, Rafael Hernandez Elementary School, Samuel E. Mason Elementary School, William E. Russell Elementary SchoolPauline A. Shaw Elementary School, Boston Renaissance Charter Public School, Higginson-Lewis K-8 School, McKay K-8 School

Brockton: Arnone Elementary School, Brookfield Elementary School, Mary E. Baker School, Brookfield Elementary School, Oscar Raymond School

Cambridge: Fletcher Maynard Academy

Pro Schools

Massachusetts

Lynn: Brickett Elementary School, Sisson Elementary School, Washington Elementary School, Lynn Early Childhood Center, Harrington Elementary School

Chelsea: Sokolowski Elementary School, Hook Elementary School, Berkowitz Elementary School, Argenziano School, John F. Kennedy Elementary School

New Hampshire

Bethlehem: Bethlehem Elementary School

Colebrook: Colebrook Elementary School

Lebanon: Mount Lebanon School

Manchester: Bakerville School, Beech Street Elementary, Gossler Park Elementary, Weston School, Wilson School

Milton: Milton Elementary School

Lincoln: Lincoln Wood Elementary School, Lincoln Wood Middle School

Rhode Island

Barrington: Primrose Elementary School

Bristol Warren: Rockwell Elementary School

Center Falls: Learning Community

Coventry: Blackrock Elementary School, Tiogue Elementary School, Washington Oak Elementary School, Western Elementary School

Cumberland: Ashton Elementary School, Cumberland Hill Elementary School, BF Norton Elementary School, Garvin Elementary School

East Greenwich: Eldredge Elementary School

East Providence: Whiteknact Elemenary School

Lincoln: Lonsdale Elementary School

North Kingstown: Hamilton Elementary School, Stony Lane Elementary, Fishing Cove Elementary, Quidnessett Elementary School

Pawtucket: Baldwin Elementary School, Varieur Elementary School

Portsmouth: Melville Elementary School

Providence: Bailey Elementary School, Carnavale Elementary School, Fogarty Elementary School, Fortes Elementary School, Kennedy Elementary School, Leviton Elementary School, Reservoir Avenue Elementary School, Sackett Elementary School, Webster Elementary School, West Elementary School

North Providence: Greystone Elementary School, Marieville Elementary School

Scituate: Clayville Elementary School

Tiverton: Pocasset Elementary School

Woonsocket: Globe Park Elementary School

 

 

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development NEC
  2. Education -
  3. Recreation & Sports -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Direct Services to Low income schools

Playworks New England currently serves 45 low-income schools across the Commonwealth, providing a Playworks-trained, full-time program coordinator, or site coordinator onsite at each school. 
 
  • The first delivery service is Playworks Coach, where a full-time professional delivers our four-component program every day of the school year. 
  • The second model is Team-Up, which includes a Playworks staff person rotating between four schools throughout the school year providing consultative services. 
Both Playworks Coach and Team-Up implement Playworks’ four-component program of recess, Class Based Action Learning, Junior Coaches, and Interscholastic Sports Leagues.
 
Budget  $2,883,006.00
Category  Education, General/Other Education, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
Every year Playworks conducts surveys with principals and teachers to help us learn more about our program impact. To measure impact, Playworks collects survey data from teachers, principals, and students who participate in the program. Our Massachusetts 2016-2017 teacher and principal data indicates that:

Physical Activity Increases:

  • 98% report an increase in the number of students that are physically active during recess.

  • 98% report an increase in intensity of physical activity during recess.

School Climate Improves:

  • 84% report a decrease in the incidents of bullying during recess.

  • 84% report a decrease in the number of conflicts and discipline referrals during recess.

Recover Learning Time:

  • 90% report a reduction in the amount of time transitioning from recess to classroom instruction, reclaiming 18 hours of teaching time over the course of the school year.

  • 94% report an increase in the students’ ability to focus on class activities.
Program Long-Term Success 
Playworks' ultimate goal is to create an educational and social environment where students learn how to interact with their peers in appropriate and respectful ways, practice safe and healthy behaviors, take on meaningful leadership roles on the playground and in the classroom, and make positive contributions to the broader school community.
Program Success Monitored By 

In 2013, Stanford University and Mathematica Policy Research released results of a randomized control study of Playworks. This level of evaluation is considered the gold standard for research. Several findings were statistically significant indicating the impact did not happen by chance but was a result of Playworks programming:


·        Playworks Schools Have Less Bullying: Teachers in Playworks schools reported significantly less bullying and exclusionary behavior during recess compared to teachers in control schools.

·        Students Feel Safer At School and Recess: Playworks teachers’ average rating of students’ feelings of safety at school was 20% higher than the average ratings reported by teachers in control schools. Specifically focusing on recess, Playworks teachers’ average rating of students’ feelings of safety and engagement in inclusive behavior during recess was 26% higher than the average rating reported by teachers in control schools.

·        Students Are Engaged In More Vigorous Physical Activity: Accelerometer data showed that children in Playworks schools spent significantly more time in vigorous physical activity at recess than their peers in control schools

·        Students Are Ready To Learn: Teachers in Playworks schools reported spending significantly less time to transition from recess to learning activities. Playworks teachers’ average rating of difficulties transitioning to learning activities after recess was 23% lower than the rating reported by teachers in control schools.

Examples of Program Success 
Success Story: The Gardner Pilot Academy
Coach Caroline worked hard at her school to create a playground that was a healthy, inclusive and safe place to play for all students. One such student that benefited from the program was Delmace, a first grade student who is confined to a wheel chair without any use of his legs from the waist down. On the very first day Coach Caroline met Delmace, she could see he had a huge desire for play and fun. Coach Caroline learned that Delmace was not comfortable playing in his chair with other students. Coach Caroline immediately began to work to find games that Delmace would feel comfortable to play in his chair. Over the course of the year, Delmace actively played baseball and kickball. His favorite game became hockey. Delmace was able to take an active part in the game with the help of Coach Caroline. Now during recess, you can find Delmace with a huge smile on his face, eager to participate in the newest game.

Training and Technical Support

Playworks New England has a training department that offers training and technical support to schools, districts, PTAs, CBOs, and NGOs who serve youth. This training provides adults with tools and techniques to encourage healthy and inclusive play in their schools and communities. This allows Playworks to reach youth who don't qualify for our direct service programs.
Budget  $270,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Education, General/Other
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
Playworks collects survey data from administrators, teachers and support staff at schools partnering with Playworks to achieve safe and healthy play. Survey results from our Pro partner schools for the 2016-17 school year indicate, among other findings, that:
 
Physical Activity Increases:
• 98% report an increase in the number of students engaged in healthy play.
• 95% report an increase in the level of cooperation among students at recess.
• 93% report an increase the number of students who are physical active.
 
School Climate Improves:
• 100% report an increase in the level of cooperation among students during class.
• 93% agree that Playworks creates a safe and effective learning environment.
• 90% report a decrease in the number of bullying incidents.
 
Learning Time Increases:
• 100% report an increase in students’ level of participation in academic activities.
• 92% report an increase in students’ ability to focus on class activities.
• 85% report a decrease in the number of disruptive events in the classroom.
Program Long-Term Success  Playworks New England seeks to stop the chaos, shift behavior, and accelerate learning at the schools we serve.
Program Success Monitored By  To effectively monitor training quality, we have developed an evaluation form used at the end of each training to gather feedback about the trainers, the delivery, and content. In addition, we use performance measure on our technical assistance visits to ensure success and gather data.
Examples of Program Success 
Training Success Story:
 
“Prior to the training, the Community Safety Assistants (adults who monitor recess) were yelling at kids and waiting for negative behaviors to emerge. Playworks Training gave them new skills, certified them in recess management, and turned the recess and lunch periods from a negative time of day to a positive, active place.” Kirk Nicholas, Assistant Superintendent, Stockton Unified School District, Stockton, CA

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Jonathan Gay
CEO Term Start Jan 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Jonathan Gay has stepped into the role of being the Executive Director. Jonathan has worked with Playworks for eight and a half of years and is excited to lead our team in this interim role. He has served as a Playworks Coach, Playworks Manager and for the past three years has led the Development team reach a financially sustainable level.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Eunice Dunham June 2006 July 2008

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Karleen Herbst Development Director
Rebeca Pazo Program Director

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Fit-Friendly Worksite - Gold Achievement American Heart Association 2013
Edvestor Finalist EdVestors 2012
Social Innovator Root Cause 2009

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Our primary collaboration is with the schools and communities we serve. Teacher, principal and student buy-in is extremely important to our success, and feedback from year-end surveys suggests we were quite successful in our programs.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 50
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 1,200
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 70%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 14
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 32
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 25
Male: 25
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Tri-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Jay McQuaide
Board Chair Company Affiliation Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts
Board Chair Term July 2016 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Kanda Alagappan Carbonite Voting
Mrs. Allison Bauer MA Department of Health Voting
Mr. James Burns Brown Brothers Harriman Voting
Mr. Christopher di Bonaventura Fidelity Investments Voting
Mr. Aidan Donahue Fidelity Voting
Ms. Valerie Fleishman NEHI Voting
Ms. Rita German John Hancock Voting
Mr. Doug Kangos PwC Voting
Mr. Jordan Krasnow Goulston & Storrs Voting
Ms. Nan Langowitz Babson College Voting
Mr. Jay McQuaide Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
Mr. Dave Newman Strategy Group Inc. Voting
Mr. Edward Orazem Fidelity Voting
Ms. Christine Weithman Health Management Resources Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 12
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 95%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $2,611,403 $2,095,084 $1,996,011
Total Expenses $2,158,519 $1,851,501 $1,995,688

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,100,000 $931,586 $853,610
Government Contributions $165,908 $150,219 $11,994
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $165,908 $150,219 $11,994
Individual Contributions $141,632 $124,888 $120,211
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $1,119,149 $854,582 $954,331
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $84,715 $28,067 $55,865
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $5,742 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,791,581 $1,536,307 $1,656,504
Administration Expense $194,267 $166,587 $179,568
Fundraising Expense $172,671 $148,607 $159,616
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.21 1.13 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 83% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 12% 15%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $0 -- --
Current Assets $0 -- --
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- --
Current Liabilities $0 -- --
Total Net Assets $0 -- --

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

*Please note that the uploaded 990s and audited financials are for our national IED.

Foundation Comments

The charts and graphs on this page represent Playworks Massachusetts financials.  The financial spreadsheet for Playworks Massachusetts is available on the Other Documents tab. The IRS Form 990s and Audits posted above are per the national Playworks entity and cover the entire organization. There are no assets and liabilities listed for the local chapter as the assets and liabilities are calculated on the national level.
 
Please note: For fiscal years 2016, 2015 and 2014 the Earned Revenue total in the charts above includes Earned Revenue from Trainings (as indicated in Other Documents, Financial Statement).

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Playworks' ultimate goal is that children are physically healthy and experiencing positive social, emotional, and intellectual development within their schools. To be eligible for Playworks, schools must serve populations where at least 50 percent of students are eligible for free and/or reduced lunch. We choose to work only in these schools because the children served often come from neighborhoods challenged by poverty and crime with limited opportunities to play. Our programming stops the chaos at recess, shifts kids’ behavior into a positive direction, and accelerates learning in the classroom. Students are taught conflict resolution skills, teamwork and empathy, as well as get their daily dosage of physical activity. Through Playworks, we create school environments where all our students are focused, prepared, healthy and ready to learn.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Playworks' success starts with a professionally trained adult who believes strongly in the Playworks model and philosophy, works well with students and school staff, and implements our full-day four component program: recess, junior coach leadership, class game time, and developmental sports leagues. The coach introduces a common set of rules to games as well as conflict resolution tools and positive reinforcement in order to reduce the number of conflicts that arise, enable youth to resolve their own conflicts, and create an environment for positive play. Additional strategies include fostering youth leadership, consistent messaging about the importance of play, and encouraging adults to play alongside youth. 
 
During the 2017­-18 school year, Playworks New England will serve 120 elementary schools across New England reaching 60,000 students. We achieve our mission by providing as much as 30­-45 minutes of daily physical activity to children throughout the school day by engaging all children in recess and extracurricular activities that focus on healthy and inclusive play.
 
We offer three levels of integrated services to schools. The first is direct service, where a full time professional coach delivers our four component program every day of the school year. The second is expert professional development for school personnel. The third model is TeamUp, which includes a Playworks staff person rotating between four schools throughout the school year providing consultative services.
 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Additionally, unlike many school-based programs, Playworks operates in our partner low-income schools every day of the school year. We use play, a universally accessible activity, to improve the educational climate for every student. Children receive repeated reinforcement in healthy play from the Playworks coach at recess, from teachers in the classroom, and even from other staff during activities that take place before and after school. Saturating the school day with an emphasis on play and respectful social behavior ensures that it sticks. Playworks coaches reach every child in the school, not just those students who struggle the most with behavior issues or those who are least active. This approach makes it possible to shift the climate for everyone at the school, creating a ripple effect far beyond the play and physical activities. As individual children have more fun, feel safer, and get in trouble less often, the experience for all students at recess and throughout the school day improves.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

The long-term outcomes are possible if certain school conditions are met: support for Playworks components, philosophy, and required facilities. This support includes full and faithful implementation of the Playworks program components; building time into the curriculum for class game time; teachers who are eager to participate; letting the Playworks coach organize the playground environment as he or she sees fit; and finally, coaches working with teachers, yard aides, or other adults who supervise play and so that recess is run in a routine manner, even when the coach is absent or when turnover in coaches occur. These conditions are crucial if schools are to experience long-term school-wide changes, including more physically active students engaging in positive play during recess, and students who are mentally and emotionally prepared to learn upon returning to the classroom at the end of recess.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Playworks aims to ensure all students are physically active and engaged in play at recess and other play times, prepare all children both mentally and emotionally in order to be ready to learn, and promote healthy, productive play both in and out of school. Over the past seven years, Playworks has grown from serving 7,000 students in 14 schools across Boston to 120 schools serving 60,000 students daily. Moreover, our programming operates across the New England region.
 
We have also launched a training and professional development strategy to serve schools and youth-serving organizations outside of these regions. Our growth to date reaffirms our ability to support the healthy development of children across the state and we have strategic plan to serve the gateway regions throughout New England. Ultimately, we will measure our long-term success on our ability to reach children across the region.