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Peer Health Exchange (PHE)

 745 Atlantic Avenue, Eighth Floor
 Boston, MA 02111
[P] (513) 629-0588
[F] --
www.peerhealthexchange.org
[email protected]
Uchenna Ndulue
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INCORPORATED: 2003
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 56-2374305

LAST UPDATED: 09/06/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Peer Health Exchange's mission is to empower young people with the knowledge, skills, and resources to make healthy decisions. We do this by training college students to teach our effective health education curriculum in under-resourced high schools. Through our health education program we aim to reduce unplanned pregnancy, reduce substance use, and increase help-seeking behavior for high school students. Our vision is that Peer Health Exchange, with our partners, will advance health equity and improve health outcomes for young people.

Mission Statement

Peer Health Exchange's mission is to empower young people with the knowledge, skills, and resources to make healthy decisions. We do this by training college students to teach our effective health education curriculum in under-resourced high schools. Through our health education program we aim to reduce unplanned pregnancy, reduce substance use, and increase help-seeking behavior for high school students. Our vision is that Peer Health Exchange, with our partners, will advance health equity and improve health outcomes for young people.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $602,510.00
Projected Expense $602,510.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Peer Health Exchange (PHE)

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Peer Health Exchange's mission is to empower young people with the knowledge, skills, and resources to make healthy decisions. We do this by training college students to teach our effective health education curriculum in under-resourced high schools. Through our health education program we aim to reduce unplanned pregnancy, reduce substance use, and increase help-seeking behavior for high school students. Our vision is that Peer Health Exchange, with our partners, will advance health equity and improve health outcomes for young people.


Background Statement

In 1999, six Yale undergraduates began teaching health workshops in New Haven public schools in order to fill the gap left by an underfunded, understaffed district health program. These college students believed that all young people deserve equal opportunities to be healthy- including access to health education- regardless of their zip code or socioeconomic status. In 2003, the founding members of the group established Peer Health Exchange (PHE) to replicate this successful program in other communities with unmet health education needs.
 
PHE Boston launched in 2006 with significant financial support from the GreenLight Fund, a prominent venture philanthropy fund that identifies innovative, high-performing nonprofits in cities across the country and supports their successful expansion. We have provided effective sexual health, mental health, and substance misuse prevention education for over ten years, serving 33,000 high school students and training approximately 4,000 volunteers in that time. Our vision is that PHE, with our partners, will ultimately advance health equity and improve health outcomes for young people in our community.
 
We work with four partnering universities (Northeastern, Tufts, Harvard, and Boston University) to selectively recruit and rigorously train college volunteer health educators. PHE staff then coordinates volunteer and high school schedules, so that our volunteers teach an engaging 13-workshop curriculum to ninth grade students. Through our skills-based health education curriculum we aim to reduce unplanned pregnancy, reduce substance use, and increase help-seeking behavior for high school students.
 
In the classroom, PHE volunteer health educators use role play and other interactive activities to help ninth grade students practice critical skills for sexual health, mental health, and substance misuse prevention. These skills include how to communicate effectively, identify sexual consent, evaluate health information, analyze potential consequences, and make decisions. Workshop topics include “Communication & Advocacy,” “Decision Making,” and “Accessing Resources.” Students also learn to assess the validity of internet resources and identify the closest adolescent-friendly clinic. Where possible, we integrate tours of the students' school-based health clinic into our program, in order to connect students with the preventative health care they need.

Impact Statement

Peer Health Exchange (PHE) launched in Boston in 2006. Since that time we have trained nearly 4,000 volunteer health educators and provided health education to over 33,000 ninth grade students.
 
We recently completed an external study with the American Institute of Research (2015 and 2016), which helped us analyze our program's outcomes in relation to our goals and measure our impact. PHE was shown to have statistically significant positive effects on students' knowledge, skills, attitudes, intentions and behaviors in relation to their sexual and mental health. More specifically, we found that PHE positively impacts young people in some key ways:

· P1) PHE students increased their sexual health knowledge at five times the rate of those in the comparison group. PHE students were 30% more likely to correctly identify sexual consent.

2) PHE students had greater intentions to use condoms and other forms of contraceptives than those in the comparison study.
 
3) PHE students were more likely to speak with a trusted adult and to have conversations about their health. PHE students were also better at identifying warning signs of poor mental health.

We also found through this study that PHE students who received a tour of their school-based health center via PHE were nearly twice as likely to visit a health center following our program. We will continue to build on this work in 2017-2018, identifying additional ways to connect PHE students with health resources and care in their communities.

We have set the following program goals for the 2017-2018 academic year:

1) To train a minimum of 280 college student volunteers to teach our skills-based health curriculum in our partner high schools;
2) To teach the PHE curriculum to a minimum of 3,100 ninth grade students in the Greater Boston area; and
3) To increase students’ ability to make healthy decisions regarding their mental health, sexual health, and substances. 

Needs Statement

Every day, young people in our community navigate difficult decisions around their mental health, sexual health, and substance use that pose serious consequences to their health, academic success, and their futures. According to the Center for Disease Control’s Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (YRBSS), in Massachusetts:

· 26% of sexually active ninth grade students did not use a pregnancy prevention method the last time they had sex.
· 61% of high school students have used alcohol. 34% of high school students currently drink (had at least 1 drink within the past 30 days), and 1 in 5 high school students binge drink.
· 15% have seriously considered attempting suicide.

Nationwide, preventable and/or treatable health issues directly contribute to over one million high school students dropping out of school each year. Still, many under-resourced high schools in Boston cannot provide health education to ninth grade students due to budget cuts. Consequently, students often are uninformed and unprepared to make critical decisions around their mental health, sexual health, and substance use.

PHE meets the critical need for effective health education in under-resourced schools.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- West Roxbury

We partner with 17 low-income high schools in Boston, Malden, Lynn, and Revere.Our school partners include:Boston Latin Academy, Brighton High School, Dearborn STEM Academy, East Boston High School, Excel High School, Fenway High School, Jeremiah Burke High School, John D. O'Bryant School of Mathematics & Science, Josiah Quincy Upper School, Malden High School, Tech Boston Academy, Urban Science Academy, Revere High School, West Roxbury Academy, Lynn Classical, Lynn English, and Lynn Vocational.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Educational Services
  2. Health Care - Public Health
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Peer Health Exchange (PHE)

PHE meets a critical need for effective health education in under-resourced schools in Greater Boston. We work with four partnering universities (Northeastern, Tufts, Harvard, and Boston University) to selectively recruit and rigorously train college volunteer health educators. PHE staff then coordinates volunteer and high school schedules, so that our volunteers teach an engaging 13-workshop curriculum to ninth grade students. Through our skills-based health
education curriculum we aim to reduce unplanned pregnancy, reduce substance use, and increase help-seeking behavior for high school students. Our program also serves as an important point of connection for students to additional health resources and services.
Budget  $602,510.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
In the 2017-2018 academic year, we will train at least 280 volunteer health educators and provide a minimum of 3,100 ninth grade students in Greater Boston with effective health education.We will provide these students with the knowledge, skills, and resources they need to make healthy decisions.
Program Long-Term Success 

Our vision is that Peer Health Exchange, with our partners, will advance health equity and improve health outcomes for youth in the Greater Boston area.

Program Success Monitored By 

·       Our Executive Director, Program Director, and Program Manager routinely track progress towards our goals for number of volunteers trained and ninth grade students served by collecting and analyzing data in our volunteer management database (Salesforce). They formally report on our progress towards these goals on a near-monthly basis to PHE Boston’s Board of Directors.

 
In order to measure our program's effectiveness in terms of increasing students' ability to make healthy decisions, and to inform programmatic decisions, we employ post-program evaluation methods to measure youth knowledge, attitudes, intentions, skills, and behaviors in relation to their mental health, sexual health, and substance misuse. We also use workshop observations by program staff, interviews with classroom instructors, and workshop logs and records. We measure outcomes in relation to our college volunteers as well, including volunteer feedback, retention rates, and future commitments to public service.
Examples of Program Success 

Last year (2016-2017) we provided health education to over 2,500 students and trained 270 volunteer health educators. We also positioned ourselves to grow substantially in the coming years and reach more students through our health education program.

As noted in other sections on this profile, PHE recently completed an external evaluation with the American Institute of Research (AIR), and found that our program has a statistically significant positive effect on students' knowledge, skills, attitudes, intentions, and behaviors in relation to their mental health and sexual health.We know our program is having a positive impact on young people.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Louise Langheier
CEO Term Start Oct 2003
CEO Email [email protected]g
CEO Experience

In 2003, Louise Davis Langheier co-founded Peer Health Exchange, Inc. (PHE) with Katy Dion in order to help fill a gap left by underfunded, understaffed health education programs in public high schools nationwide. As Chief Executive Officer, Louise is primarily responsible for leading Peer Health Exchange's national growth plan, building and managing the Peer Health Exchange Staff and Boards, raising funds, and providing fiscal and organizational oversight. Louise graduated from Yale University with a B.A. in History. While at Yale, she co-founded and directed Community Health Educators, the student volunteer program out of which Peer Health Exchange, Inc. grew. Louise serves on the Board of Directors of Dwight Hall at Yale-the center for public service and social justice. In addition, in 2011, Louise was named one of 24 Entrepreneurial Leaders for Public Education Fellows through the Aspen Institute and NewSchools Venture Fund. This program is designed to recognize and support exceptional entrepreneurial leaders who are committed to transforming public education.

Co-CEO Mr. Uchenna Ndulue
Co-CEO Term Start Sept 2016
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience

Uchenna joined Peer Health Exchange as the Boston Executive Director in September 2016. He has twenty years experience supervising youth enrichment and health education programs. Prior to joining PHE, he was the director of the Boston Area Health Education Center at the Boston Public Health Commission. Uchenna believes that health education can be a powerful tool to further health equity, especially when health education is community informed and culturally relevant. Uchenna received his B.A. in East Asian Languages and Cultures from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, his MPH in Community Health Education and Public Administration from Southern Illinois University Carbondale, and is completing his PhD in Health Services Research from Boston University.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Advancement Award The Boston Club 2014

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

In pursuit of our goals and vision, and to leverage our funding to serve a larger audience, PHE Boston currently works in close collaboration with: 1) Our 17 partner high schools and school district administrators; 2) Health and Wellness Council members at Boston Public Schools; 3) Host teachers in our high school site classrooms; 4) College student volunteers at Harvard, Tufts, Northeastern, and Boston University; 5) And health and education experts, to continue improving our skills-based health education curriculum.
 
As part of our strategic plan, we have also prioritized developing our partnerships with health plans and medical institutions. PHE Boston can play a pivotal role in improving connections between the education and health systems, helping students to access additional health information, resources, and preventative health care.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 280
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Martin Schneider
Board Chair Company Affiliation Fine Capital Partners
Board Chair Term Oct 2008 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Larry Berger Wireless Generation Voting
Ms. Angela Diaz Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center --
Ms. Lauren Dutton Community Volunteer --
Ms. Laura Fisher Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Michael Grobstein Retired Voting
Ms. Barbara Krasa Kelly Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP Voting
Ms. Louise D. Langheier Chief Executive Office and Co-Founder Voting
Mr. Stanley Rosenzweig Retired Voting
Mr. Martin Schneider Fine Capital Partners Voting
Mr. Bob Searle New Profit --
Ms. Marci Spector New Profit Inc. Voting
Mr. Gary Syman SeaChange Captital Partners --
Mr. Timothy A. Wilkins Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Kevin Callans Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary NonVoting
Mr. Mark Elefante Hemenway & Barnes NonVoting
Ms. Jane Glazer Nurse Practitioner Voting
Mr. William Greenrose Deloitte Voting
Ms. Michelle Louis Boston University Voting
Ms. Anne R. Lovett Lovett-Woodsum Foundation NonVoting
Ms. Janet Nahirny Community Volunteer --
Ms. Susan Follett Panella -- --
Dr. Margot Phillips -- Voting
Ms. Leslie Read Deloitte Voting
Ms. Elizabeth Shelburne Freelance Writer Voting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 7%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $12,589,847 $5,020,801 $3,915,292
Total Expenses $6,408,650 $7,602,266 $7,528,552

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$2,263,663 $1,904,097 $2,138,655
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $10,086,366 $2,293,799 $1,561,477
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $129,756 $61,530 $3,540
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- $536,384 $37,341
Revenue In-Kind $110,062 $224,991 $174,279
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $4,317,035 $5,052,009 $5,190,826
Administration Expense $758,272 $1,133,287 $966,185
Fundraising Expense $1,333,343 $1,416,970 $1,371,541
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.96 0.66 0.52
Program Expense/Total Expenses 67% 66% 69%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 11% 30% 37%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $11,393,112 $5,197,442 $7,879,421
Current Assets $4,275,361 $4,947,249 $5,496,924
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- $0
Current Liabilities $461,414 $446,941 $547,455
Total Net Assets $10,931,698 $4,750,501 $7,331,966

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 9.27 11.07 10.04

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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