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Youth Villages

 400 West Cummings Park, Suite 5200
 Woburn, MA 01801
[P] (781) 937-7900
[F] (781) 937-7901
www.youthvillages.org
kristin.wright@youthvillages.org
Kristin Wright
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INCORPORATED: 1986
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 58-1716970

LAST UPDATED: 12/04/2018
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Youth Villages is a private nonprofit organization dedicated to helping emotionally and behaviorally troubled children and their families live successfully.

Mission Statement

Youth Villages is a private nonprofit organization dedicated to helping emotionally and behaviorally troubled children and their families live successfully.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2011 to June 30, 2012
Projected Income $171,225,382.00
Projected Expense $160,956,440.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Intensive In-Home Services
  • Transitional Living Services

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Youth Villages is a private nonprofit organization dedicated to helping emotionally and behaviorally troubled children and their families live successfully.

Background Statement

Founded in the merger of two residential treatment campuses in 1986, Youth Villages is a nationally recognized leader in the field of children’s mental health, known for achieving positive and long-lasting results using evidence-based treatment solutions. With a mission of helping children and their families live successfully, Youth Villages has grown from a one city, one state operation to currently provide services in 66 locations in 52 cities across 11 states, including Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, Florida, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Oregon, Indiana and the District of Columbia. In Massachusetts, Youth Villages has offices in Woburn, Worcester, West Springfield, Plymouth and Lawrence. The organization has an annual operating budget of $171 million, and this year more than 18,000 young people and their families will be cared for across the country through Youth Villages’ research-based service model.

 

Youth Villages’ expansion into Massachusetts began in February 2006 with a seed grant of $266,000 from Strategic Grant Partners. Youth Villages was awarded the opportunity to provide our Intercept Program, an intensive in-home counseling service with demonstrated effectiveness, across the Commonwealth through a contract with the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families (DCF) and began working with its first family in June 2007. Since that time, Youth Villages was awarded a contract through the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health and has provided services to more than 530 of Massachusetts’ most vulnerable children and families through the Intercept Program. 

 

In early 2008, Youth Villages was approached by two Boston foundations, The GreenLight Fund and The Paul and Phyllis Fireman Charitable Foundation, about bringing the Transitional Living (TL) program to Massachusetts to assist with the large number of young adults who are aging out of state custody but lack the support, resources and skills needed to live on their own successfully. Youth Villages’ TL Program helps young adults prepare to leave the DCF system and successfully transition into adulthood through intensive community-based intervention that is conducted in the natural environments in which these young people live. Since the first youth enrolled in the Massachusetts TL program back in 2009, Youth Villages has provided services to more than 130 former Massachusetts foster youth.


Impact Statement

Our most significant accomplishments in the past year:
  • We continue to show success in our outcome data: of the children who have been discharged from our programs for two years, 83% are living at home or in a home-like environment in the community
  • The NonProfit Times and Best Companies Group have named Youth Villages as one of the 50 Best Nonprofit Organizations to Work For in the United States in 2010 and 2011.
  • Youth Villages’ Transitional Living program is participating in an independent, random assignment evaluation conducted by MDRC, a non-profit research and policy group with an outstanding reputation that specializes in this type of evaluation. The study will include 1,600 youth, making it the largest random assignment evaluation of this type of program for young people in this critical transition phase. The purpose of the trial is to critically and objectively evaluate if the program is achieving the long term goals as intended.  Participants are followed for 5 years post discharge to assess their long term success in the community.  
  • In August 2011, the Day Foundation in Memphis announced it will give Youth Villages a $42 million matching grant primarily to help expand the Transitional Living program.  The Day  grant and its matching funds will allow Youth Villages to serve more than 6,500 young adults across the country during the next 5 years.
  • Give Smart, a book on philanthropy which was released in March, 2011, makes several mentions of Youth Villages and specifically the impact our work has made on thousands of lives.

 


Needs Statement

To raise funds to expand the Transitional Living Program throughout Massachusetts to make sure all eligible young adults aging out of foster care have the opportunity to participate in this program.
 
To recruit and retain quality staff to ensure providing the best possible care to our young people
 

To increase awareness of the work that we do


CEO Statement

Right now, there is a vulnerable child being raised by the state. Without intervention, she will spend her childhood in expensive institutions, being shuffled from foster home to foster home. She will experience unimaginable trauma and, as a result, will be 75% more likely to wind up in institutions or prisons as an adult. Because once kids are in the system, they tend to stay in the system.

 

Youth Villages knows that there is a better way to help her and the thousands of children like her growing up now in child welfare, juvenile justice and children’s mental and behavioral health systems in Massachusetts.

 
We fiercely believe that building strong families is the answer. And we have proven our belief by helping thousands of children and families across the country.
 
Our counselors are a force for families, providing evidentiary family restoration for kids and parents alike. We do this with one goal in mind: to ensure that each child has a functioning family and a safe, permanent home. Because stronger families result in safer neighborhoods and better communities for everyone.
 

Our long-term success rate of 80% is nearly twice the national average, compared to traditional services. And we operate at one-third the cost. Additionally, by obsessively collecting data and measuring outcomes, we’re able to quantify effectiveness precisely—something most programs don’t do.

 

Our dream for our state is that no Massachusetts child will grow up without a loving family, either their own or an adoptive family. We have momentum, but we need your help. Please consider joining our force -- a force for good, a force for change, the force for families.

 

An investment in Youth Villages is an investment in the future of precious Massachusetts children and young adults, but it also gives foundations and individual donors a chance to enhance Massachusetts' reputation and influence so that reform can be achieved in child welfare, juvenile justice and children’s mental and behavioral health systems across the nation.  

 


Board Chair Statement

Board President Mike Bruns' message in the 2006 Program Report: "While Youth Villages has achieved many important milestones in its first 20 years, there is no doubt that this is the most exciting time in our history, especially when we look at what the future holds. In two decades, our organization has built a reputation for providing the most effective help to children with the most difficult emotional and behavioral problems. Our success with the more than 30,000 children and families we have helped since 1986 is now being recognized on a national level, and we are committed to doing more. Bringing our evidence-based programs to more children and families who desperately need help will be rewarding for everyone who has had a hand in our success over the years. The Board of Directors will be forever grateful for the help provided by our volunteers and the continued financial support from all of our donors. Now, as we aim even higher, we've been presented with the opportunity to help build a truly enduring institution, one that is firmly established as a national leader in children's mental health. On the road ahead, we pledge our continuing commitment to excellence and to helping more troubled children and families find lasting success next year - and every year."

Geographic Area Served

Massachusetts-All Regions
--

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  2. Human Services - Family Services
  3. Human Services - Family Counseling

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Intensive In-Home Services

Youth Villages’ acclaimed intensive in-home counseling program, Intercept, provides troubled children and their families with intensive help through counseling in their own homes. Counseling focuses on all areas (or systems) that may affect a young person's behavior and perceptions including family, friends/peers, the community, school, neighborhoods and church.
Budget  $4,060,200.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family Preservation
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Families
Program Short-Term Success 

Child and family safety is the most important short-term goal of the Intercept Program. Once safety is established, Intercept staff work with parents to establish a working partnership with the child’s school in order to achieve appropriate educational functioning, assist parents in meeting basic needs, and help them to access a wide variety of resources in the community that will allow them to successfully function as a family. Successful discharges occur when youth are able to remain with their family and to function appropriately within the community.

Examples of program success

Program Long-Term Success 

The Intercept Program expects to impact families long-term by assisting them in creating a sustainable support structure that will allow them to manage their child’s behavior long after the end of the program. It is anticipated that this will include an increase in parental competence, appropriate educational functioning, avoidance of negative involvement with the legal system, and stability in the family placement so that out-of-home placements are not necessary.

Program Success Monitored By 

Much of Youth Villages' high-performance culture is made possible by the organization’s emphasis on outcomes and results. Youth Villages’ 14-member research department tracks outcomes on every youth who leaves its programs, first at discharge and again at 6, 12, and 24 months post-discharge. In addition, Youth Villages employs a balanced scorecard performance management system consisting of 10 Core Indicators and hundreds of program-specific measures. These indicators include: projected vs. actual census, successful discharges, outcome at one year post-discharge, individual program disruptions, staff turnover, physical interventions, serious incidents, revenue over expenses, customer perception of care, and compliance. This focus on clear data and outcomes gives Youth Villages confidence in the quality of its services and allows for continuous quality improvement in its operations. Outcome data is released on a quarterly basis and can be requested at any time by a funder.

Examples of Program Success 

The Massachusetts Intercept program has served more than 600 youth. 


At Discharge
  • Almost 80% of youth are discharged home with family
One Year Post-Discharge
  • Nearly 75% of youth remain at home with family
  • Almost 80% of youth report no trouble with the law
  • 90% of youth are in school, have graduated from high school, or are in GED classes
  • 12% have been in residential treatment, 7% in a psychiatric hospital, and 5% in a detention or correctional facility
  • 20% of youth under 18 at the time of follow-up were in state custody; youth who participate in the Massachusetts Intercept Program are at high risk of placement into state custody at the time of admission

Transitional Living Services

Now in its tenth year, Youth Villages’ Transitional Living (TL) program continues to meet the needs of young adults who are "aging out" of state care and need help learning to live successfully on their own. Depending on their needs, TL staff members work to help program participants find and maintain employment and a place to live, finish their education, pay bills, develop permanent relationships with trusting adults and access community resources.
Budget  $2,067,600.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

In the short-term, the TL Program seeks to increase youth and community safety through thorough and realistic safety planning and follow-up; TL specialists work with youth to secure safe, affordable and stable housing, establish and pursue and education and vocational goals, and create and maintain a support structure with caring adults in their community. Through work on all these fronts, it is anticipated that youth will successfully discharge from the program having stable housing, community connections, and that they will be making progress on educational and vocational goals.

Program Long-Term Success 

The TL Program seeks to help youth increase positive, lasting connections to others within their community, achieve their educational goals, increase vocational stability, retain safe, affordable and stable housing, and decrease negative involvement with the Legal system.

 

Program Success Monitored By  Much of Youth Villages' high-performance culture is made possible by the organization’s emphasis on outcomes and results. Youth Villages’ 14-member research department tracks outcomes on every youth who leaves its programs, first at discharge and again at 6, 12, and 24 months post-discharge. In addition, Youth Villages employs a balanced scorecard performance management system consisting of 10 Core Indicators and hundreds of program-specific measures. These indicators include: projected vs. actual census, successful discharges, outcome at one year post-discharge, individual program disruptions, staff turnover, physical interventions, serious incidents, revenue over expenses, customer perception of care, and compliance. This focus on clear data and outcomes gives Youth Villages confidence in the quality of its services and allows for continuous quality improvement in its operations. Outcome data is released on a quarterly basis and can be requested at any time by a funder.
Examples of Program Success 

Nationally, the TL program has served more than 4,700 youth. 


At Discharge
  • More than 85% of youth are living independently or with family

One Year Post-Discharge

  • More than 85% of youth remain at home (living independently or with family)
  • Over 80% of youth report no trouble with the law
  • 84% of youth are in school, have graduated from high school, are in GED classes and/or are employed
  • Less than 10% have been placed in a detention or correctional facility

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Right now, there is a vulnerable child being raised by the state. Without intervention, she will spend her childhood in expensive institutions, being shuffled from foster home to foster home. She will experience unimaginable trauma and, as a result, will be 75% more likely to wind up in institutions or prisons as an adult. Because once kids are in the system, they tend to stay in the system.

Youth Villages knows that here is a better way to help her and the thousands of children like her growing up now in child welfare, juvenile justice and children’s mental and behavioral health systems in Massachusetts.

We fiercely believe that building strong families is the answer. And we have proven our belief by helping thousands of children and families across the country. Our long-term success rate of 80% is nearly twice the national average, compared to traditional services. And we operate at one-third the cost. Additionally, by obsessively collecting data and measuring outcomes, we’re able to quantify effectiveness precisely—something most programs don’t do.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Patrick W. Lawler
CEO Term Start Jan 1980
CEO Email pat.lawler@youthvillages.org
CEO Experience

Under Pat Lawler's leadership, Youth Villages has grown from two small residential facilities serving 40 youth in Memphis to a national leader in the child welfare community. The organization now serves over 18,000 families every year and has established 66 locations across 11 states and the District of Columbia. Mr. Lawler collaborated with Tennessee's Department of Children's Services to establish the Youth Villages Continuum of Care. This nationally recognized service approach has become a model for other states interested in reforming their systems of care.

In 2006, Lawler was recognized as one of "America's Best Leaders" by U.S. News & World Report in conjunction with the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He also is one of the select few professionals in the nonprofit sector inducted into the prestigious Society of Entrepreneurs. Youth Villages has been cited as a model by such prominent organizations as the American Youth Policy Forum, National Coalition of Juvenile Justice and the United Way of America.

Mr. Lawler's entire career has been spent working with society's most vulnerable children. He began as a counselor at Tall Trees Guidance School when he was 18 years old and then worked at the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County for 5 years before becoming the CEO of Youth Villages.

ADDITIONAL PROFESSIONAL AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
Mr. Lawler is chairman of the St. Francis Hospital board of directors in Bartlett, Tenn., chairman of the Diocesan Review Board Catholic Diocese; and a board member of the Bank of Bartlett, the American Re-Education Association and the Society of Entrepreneurs.

EDUCATION
MS, Memphis State University, Counseling, 1981; BA, Memphis State University, Criminal Justice, 1977

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Matthew Stone MSSW Executive Director As Youth Villages’ executive director for Massachusetts and New Hampshire, Matthew Stone is responsible for all clinical, administrative and development activities in these states. After joining Youth Villages in 2001 as a direct care counselor in a residential treatment facility in Memphis, Tenn., Matt went on to manage residential and community-based programs. In June 2006, Matt relocated to New England to bring Youth Villages’ Intercept and transitional living intensive in-home programs to the region. Matt holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in social work.
Ms. Lori Sustek Assistant Director of Community Based Programs --
Ms. Kristin Wright Development Manager --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Since 2004, EMCF has invested $21.25 million in Youth Villages to develop and implement its business plan Edna McConnell Clark Foundation 2012
The NonProfit Times and Best Companies Group have named Youth Villages as one of the 50 Best Nonprofit Organizations to Work For in the United States in 2010 and 2011. The NonProfit Times and Best Companies Group 2011
In July 2010, Casey Family Programs released a study detailing how Youth Villages had partnered with the state of Tennessee to safely reduce the number of children in foster care by 34% over 10 years. Casey Family Programs 2010
Released a case study exploring Youth Villages' innovative treatment approach, use of research in program development and targeted growth strategies (available at www.hbs.edu) Harvard Business School 2009
Youth Villages was recognized as a results-oriented nonprofit that is transforming communities with innovative and promising ideas White House 2009
CEO Patrick Lawler named one of America's Best leaders U.S. News & World Report 2006
One of 8 "Guiding Light" models in the U.S. with programs that successfully reduce the incidence of juvenile crime American Youth Policy Forum 2001
The Franklin Covey Company names Youth Villages the recipient of its Humanitarian Service Award at its 7th Annual International Symposium Franklin Covey Company 2000
Youth Villages was highlighted as a national model in its annual report and calls for other states to implement similar programs National Coalition for Juvenile Justice 2000

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) 2012
Children’s League of Massachusetts 2012
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 133
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 45
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 113
Hispanic/Latino: 9
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 4
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 113
Male: 20
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? No
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Bryan Jordan
Board Chair Company Affiliation First Horizon National Corp.
Board Chair Term Dec 2013 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Jim Barton Jr. Southeastern Asset Management Voting
Mr. Eric Bolton Mid-America Apartment Communities Voting
Mr. Paul Bower Education Realty Trust Voting
Mr. Mike Bruns Bruns Holdings Voting
Mr. Kenneth A. Campbell Retired Voting
Mr. Terry Cross MSW, ACSW, LCSW Seneca Nation of Indians Voting
Ms. Marietta Davis Enterprise and Partner Group of Microsoft Voting
Mr. Nicholas R. Ehlen Melvin Mark Brokerage Company Voting
Mrs. Joanna Jacobson Strategic Grant Partners Voting
Rev. Robert Earl Jones Hill Chapel Missionary Baptist Church Voting
Mr. Bryan Jordan First Horizon Corporation Voting
Mr. Jimmy Lackie Rhyton Capital Voting
Ms. Karole Lloyd Southeast Ernst and Young Voting
Mr. Mark Medford Vining-Sparks Voting
Mr. Jim Parrish Wunderlich Securities Voting
Mr. Johnny Pitts Lipscomb & Pitts Insurance Company Voting
Mr Ray Pohlman Auto Zone Voting
Ms. Jennifer Queen McKenna Long & Aldridge Voting
Mr. Ronnie Randall Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. H. Patterson "Pat" Ritz Footwear Specialties International Voting
Mr. Matthew F. Tarkenton Renova partners/Genesis Business Advisory Voting
Mr. Scotland Thede Nike Golf Voting
Mr. David Tyler Grant Thornton LLP Voting
Mrs. Betsy Walkup Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. George White Wellspring Management, LLC Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Deborah Fung The Paul and Phyllis Fireman Charitable Foundation NonVoting
Mr. Robert P. Gittens Northeastern University --
Mr. Paul S. Grogan The Boston Foundation NonVoting
Ms. Margaret Hall The GreenLight Fund NonVoting
Ms. Kathy Harris Sonus Networks NonVoting
Ms. Joanna Jacobson Strategic Grant Partners Voting
Mr. Paul F. Levy Community Volunteer NonVoting
Ms. Sharon Liszanckie The Bridgespan Group NonVoting
Mr. Robert M. Nephew RM Nephew & Associates NonVoting
Ms. Shannon P. O'Brien Community Volunteer NonVoting
Mr. Chris Pollara Convertiv NonVoting
Mr. Mark E. Robinson Bingham McCutchen NonVoting
Ms. Marylou Sudders Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children NonVoting
Mr. Warren E. Tolman Holland & Knight, LLP NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 22
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 20
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 69%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2011 to June 30, 2012
Projected Income $171,225,382.00
Projected Expense $160,956,440.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $196,847,549 $169,273,966 $165,930,936
Total Expenses $169,820,982 $164,868,479 $148,995,425

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$14,484,825 $6,491,025 $8,332,079
Government Contributions $72,612,761 $70,395,029 $64,029,383
    Federal $944,265 $910,942 $780,017
    State $71,668,496 $69,484,087 $63,249,366
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $15,168,061 $15,844,221 $10,732,150
Indirect Public Support $204,122 $155,457 $219,464
Earned Revenue $81,529,581 $76,000,311 $71,961,635
Investment Income, Net of Losses $10,456,216 $91,939 $10,302,873
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $192,587 $126,984 $158,204
Revenue In-Kind $1,999,258 -- --
Other $200,138 $169,000 $195,148

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $143,210,253 $137,066,067 $124,271,725
Administration Expense $22,747,508 $24,080,707 $22,018,925
Fundraising Expense $3,863,221 $3,721,705 $2,704,775
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.16 1.03 1.11
Program Expense/Total Expenses 84% 83% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 4% 4% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $229,442,427 $196,202,660 $192,541,717
Current Assets $156,538,030 $130,893,855 $126,515,257
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $16,125,399 $17,559,348 $18,303,892
Total Net Assets $213,317,028 $178,643,312 $174,237,825

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $78,000,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) 0.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal $0.00
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $0.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 9.71 7.45 6.91

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

This profile reflects the statewide work of a national nonprofit Youth Villages, Inc.  The nonprofit has an associated foundation, Youth Villages Foundation that funds Youth Villages, Inc.  
 
Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are for the national nonprofit and the associated foundation, as per the combined audited financials. The audits and IRS Form 990s posted above are per the national nonprofit. For local financial data, please contact the nonprofit directly. 
 
As referenced in Note 18 of the FY12 audit, the Organization acquired ChristieCare, effective June 1, 2011, and as such the separate existence of ChristieCare ceased. Please see Note 18 for further detail.
 
Per Note 20 in the FY13 audit, the Organization acquired Germaine Lawrence, Inc., effective September 1, 2012, and as such Germaine Lawrence, Inc. became a subsidiary of Youth Villages, Inc. under the name Youth Villages - Germaine Lawrence, Inc. Please see Note 20 for further detail.
 
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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