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Institute for Nonprofit Practice

 144 Gould Street, Suite 205
 Needham, MA 02494
[P] (781) 4005742 x 4005742
[F] (781)
www.nonprofitpractice.org
[email protected]
Audrey Gillis
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INCORPORATED: 2014
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 47-1613050

LAST UPDATED: 08/16/2017
Organization DBA
Former Names Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership (2016)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Our mission is to transform communities by equipping the most promising nonprofit leaders with the skills, confidence, and resources they need to make their organizations effective, innovative and sustainable.
  
 

Mission Statement

Our mission is to transform communities by equipping the most promising nonprofit leaders with the skills, confidence, and resources they need to make their organizations effective, innovative and sustainable.
  
 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,555,550.00
Projected Expense $1,520,804.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Fellows Program
  • Core Certificate Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Our mission is to transform communities by equipping the most promising nonprofit leaders with the skills, confidence, and resources they need to make their organizations effective, innovative and sustainable.
  
 

Background Statement

INP was founded in response to several community-wide needs

  • The need for better skills among nonprofit leaders, who had learned by experience and discovered gaps in their capabilities; 
  • A generational succession crisis, triggered by the retirement of the baby boomers;
  • A detrimental lack of diversity among top leadership;
  • The isolation of mostly small nonprofits, minimizing their impact.

INP's principal activities include:

• Year-long Core Certificate Program for middle managers and executives

• Community Fellows Program for emerging leaders 

• Continuing education workshops

• Networking activities

The 22 session, year-long certificate programs include both lecture style classes focused on skill development in such subjects as finance, strategy, fundraising, developing individuals and teams, program evaluation, and project management, in addition to small group work in a Practice Seminars. In small groups students find their leadership voice, gain confidence, and apply skills learned.

To address the lack of diversity in nonprofit leadership, we launched the Community Fellows Program (CFP) in 2012. CFP is made up of 20 high-potential, emerging leaders of color and is offered at no cost to students. It follows the same model as the Core Program with a greater emphasis on community organizing and social justice.


Impact Statement

The Institute's history is one of continual improvement, expansion, progress, and adapting to meet the changing needs of the nonprofit sector. Over ten years our staff, programming, classes, and geographic reach have grown in size and effectiveness.

 In 2012 INP was awarded The Boston Foundation’s Out of the Blue Award for “outstanding leadership in the nonprofit sector.” That same year we launched the Community Fellows Program for emerging leaders.  
We replicated our Core Certificate Program for nonprofit executives and middle managers: first in the Merrimack Valley, later in Providence Rhode Island, and most recently, in 2016, on Cape Cod.
 
To date the Institute has trained 1,000 nonprofit leaders from 450 organizations across virtually every sector including education, community development, health care, youth and family services, the environment and the arts. Each year, our student body is made up of nearly 50% people of color and more than 60% women.
 
We are affiliated with the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life at Tufts University, recently ranked 27th best college in the country by US News. The university’s commitment to civic engagement is seamlessly aligned with the values and spirit of social justice and diversity that the Institute is built upon.
 
Looking ahead, we are committed to growing the number of leaders served, to strengthen the diverse and skilled leadership pipeline while strengthening the INP community. We will deepen our curriculum through increased focus on diversity and inclusion, strategy, and data-driven decision making; increase program partnerships; broaden alumni engagement; and implement more robust evaluation practices. We will contribute to field building as opportunities arise and in the coming years will build a multi-year field building plan.

Needs Statement

The need for nonprofit leadership development in New England is both urgent and important.  Over the next five years, 64% of nonprofit leaders will leave their jobs, yet only one in three nonprofit leaders believes there is adequate bench strength to step into leadership roles when needed.

There are nearly 75,000 nonprofits in New England. If not addressed effectively--and quickly-- this leadership transition could have a devastating impact on our communities, and our most vulnerable populations will suffer most.

In addition to this massive shift in leadership, our New England racial and economic landscapes are rapidly changing: there is more diversity and more poverty than ever before. Yet despite increasingly diverse communities, top levels of nonprofit leadership still do not reflect the communities they most often serve: only 11% of nonprofit CEOs and 10% of board chairs are people of color.

Amidst these many transitions lies great opportunity: to fill open leadership positions with much more skilled, equipped, connected and diverse leadership. For the past 10 years, in anticipation of this succession crisis, the Institute has been building such a pipeline.
 
Tuition alone does not cover the full operating expense of the Core Certificate Program and we fundraise to keep the cost of attending low. Affordability is critical to the success of our program given the lack of investment in talent development in the nonprofit sector.
 
The Community Fellows Program is offered for free and the program is highly selective. We fully fundraise the cost of attending so that the most promising emerging leaders have the opportunity for this type of comprehensive leadership development. 
 

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA

Greater Boston, Cape Cod and the Islands, Merrimack Valley, Southern New Hampshire, Rhode Island

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Adult Education
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Community Fellows Program

The Community Fellows Program (CFP) is a one-year certificate program for 20 emerging leaders—almost entirely young leaders of color. CFP combines the organizational leadership training of our Core Certificate Program with an equal focus on community leadership and community organizing. Each cohort of CFP is connected to the next and the next, with the intention to create a powerful force for social justice. To make this program accessible to emerging leaders, we offer CFP free of charge.

Budget  $130,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

All 16 of our CFP students have successfully completed their first year in the newly launched two year program. We have received nearly 60 applications for the 16 slots in the 2013-2014 class. Second year students will include first year students in their capstone projects that encapsulate and exemplify what they have learned during their first year thus knitting the two groups together and creating a network of young, diverse leaders who can call upon one another as resources. 

Program Long-Term Success 

Much like with the Core Program, long term success will be realized with the increased capacity and diversity of the nonprofit sector. We currently have 385 alumni (175 are people of color). In 10 years, we will have 1,500 graduates. Through them we will increase the capacity of nonprofit management and leadership, increase the diversity of top nonprofit managers, and create a stronger and much more connected network of leaders. 

Our alumni network connects past and future participants, and encourages sharing of knowledge, connections and best practices in the nonprofit sector. This network of racially and ethnically diverse young leaders will help secure the future of the nonprofit sector. This is particularly important because a large percentage of leadership positions in the nonprofit sector will be opened during the next decade due to the retirement of baby boomers. We are preparing the pipeline for their successors and our success will be measured by the health of the nonprofit sector after their succession. 

Program Success Monitored By  Same as Core Program.        
Examples of Program Success           

Core Certificate Program

The year-long Core Certificate Program includes the following components:

  • 22 Management Seminars, held once a week from September through April

  • 22 Practice Seminars (small groups) using live cases and facilitated by senior leaders

  • Mentoring (5+ hours)

  • Ongoing peer network of support

    The two-hour Management Seminars focus on core skills ranging from managing individuals, marketing, budgeting, and fundraising to more complex topics in organizational development and project management. The classroom time is followed by two-hour small group Practice Seminars that integrate discussion, reflection, feedback and support in order to deepen and solidify the skills that are learned in the classroom and to build a deep and lasting confidence to lead.

    Each participant is given the opportunity to be paired with a mentor, a seasoned nonprofit executive pleased to share his or her lessons learned with the new generation of nonprofit leadership. 

Budget  $430,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

According to our survey results, short term success means our students are better equipped to manage and lead with vastly increased skills, confidence, and knowledge of the larger nonprofit community. Since our young nonprofit leaders are more capable of performing their duties as managers, the nonprofit community is and will become stronger and more sustainable because of their leadership abilities.

Connections to other professionals in similar positions will create a sense of community and cohesiveness. These relationships will connect not only the actual participants, but also their organizations, knowledge of best practices, resources, and communities, thus making the impact on their underserved populations stronger.

 

Program Long-Term Success 

Long term success will be realized with the increased capacity and diversity of the nonprofit sector. We currently have 385 alumni (175 are people of color). In 10 years, we will have 1,500 graduates. Through them we will increase the capacity of nonprofit management and leadership, increase the diversity of top nonprofit managers, and create a stronger and much more connected network of leaders. 

Our alumni network connects past and future participants, and encourages sharing of knowledge, connections and best practices in the nonprofit sector. This network of racially and ethnically diverse young leaders will help secure the future of the nonprofit sector. This is particularly important because a large percentage of leadership positions in the nonprofit sector will be opened during the next decade due to the retirement of baby boomers. We are preparing the pipeline for their successors and our success will be measured by the health of the nonprofit sector after their succession. 

Program Success Monitored By 

Success is measured in various ways, including number of program applicants and acceptances per year; number of mentors and program staff recruited and retained each year; number of program graduates who are promoted and/or obtain jobs at a higher level than when they entered the program; number of institutions sending multiple participants each year; number of graduates who continue to interact with INML in a meaningful way (recruitment, staff participation, networking events, etc.). 

Formal measures include:

·        A pre- and post-program survey given to each incoming student and to his/her direct supervisor. This evaluation helps to gauge the effectiveness and impact (on students and their organizations) of our program.

·        Evaluations administered for every session by the Executive Leadership Center with results communicated to faculty members.

·        A comprehensive alumni survey, which gives INML a concrete sense of its role in alumni careers and success.

 

Examples of Program Success           

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Yolanda Coentro
CEO Term Start Jan 2012
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Yolanda is the President and CEO of the Institute for Nonprofit Practice. The Institute seeks to equip, connect and diversify the nonprofit sector’s managers and leaders. In her role, Yolanda is leading the development and implementation of a plan to scale the organization nationally. Prior to the Institute, Yolanda was the Chief Operating Officer at Horizons for Homeless Children where she oversaw all center-based programs, as well as national and local training efforts focused on early childhood education and care for homeless children. She also served as the Vice President for Programs at YWCA in Boston which focused on programs aimed toward eliminating educational and health disparities in the Greater Boston community.


Yolanda began her career in nonprofit management leading Cutting EJ, a Somerville-based economic justice and anti-racism organization. Additionally, Yolanda worked at The Home for Little Wanderers as the Director of the Safe At Home Program where she oversaw a rapid and successful expansion, growing the operating budget from 1 million to 5 million, quadrupling the staff size and establishing a competitive internship program modeled after those in Boston area’s teaching hospitals.

Yolanda has led efforts to develop a plan for building a pipeline of trained and diverse community mental health workers for the Massachusetts Children’s Behavioral Health Initiative (CBHI). She chaired the Health Disparities Committee for the CBHI Advisory Council and served on the board of Silver Lining Mentoring. She is also an advisor for the Harvard-Kent Leadership and Scholarship Fund.

As a Diversity and Organizational Development practitioner, Yolanda consults with various nonprofits and state agencies with a focus on diversity and inclusion, leadership development and organizational culture change.

Yolanda is a graduate of Boston College and has her Master’s in Social Work.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Dr. Barry Dym Jan 2007 June 2016

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Out of the Blue Award The Boston Foundation 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 21
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 3
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 14
Male: 12
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Mark Rosen
Board Chair Company Affiliation Charlesbank Capital Partners
Board Chair Term Mar 2013 - Dec 2020
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Tom Bendheim b7 Properties --
Mr. Josh Chalmers Earth2 LLC --
Ms. Yolanda Coentro Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership Voting
Dr. Barry M. Dym Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership Voting
Mr. Matt Epstein Goulston & Storrs --
Ms. Pat Gray Consultant Voting
Ms. Marcia Hertz Consultant Voting
Mr. Allan Huntley 501Partners --
Mr. Justin Kang Boston Chamber of Commerce --
Ms. Pat McSweeney Consultant Voting
Ms. Nina Nicolosi John Hancock Voting
Ms. Kathy Plazak Plazak Associates --
Mr. Mark Rosen Charlesbank Capital Partners --
Mr. David Shapiro MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Charmane Higgins Strive/JRI NonVoting
Mr. Hubie Jones -- NonVoting
Mr. Peter Karoff The Philanthropic Initiative NonVoting
Mrs. Carol Lobron Development Guild --
Ms. Geeta Pradhan Cambridge Community Foundation NonVoting
Mrs. Sue Pucker Pucker Gallery NonVoting
Mr. Bill Walczak -- NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 1
Gender Female: 7
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • --
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Governance and Nominating
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,555,550.00
Projected Expense $1,520,804.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $779,883 $791,142 $638,889
Total Expenses $509,420 $747,616 $645,423

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- $484,312 $335,000
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $0 -- --
Individual Contributions $639,457 $77,600 $69,689
Indirect Public Support $0 -- --
Earned Revenue $140,426 $229,230 $234,200
Investment Income, Net of Losses $0 -- --
Membership Dues $0 -- --
Special Events $0 -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $0 -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $364,942 $529,098 $102,161
Administration Expense $77,102 $106,319 $543,262
Fundraising Expense $67,376 $112,199 --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.53 1.06 0.99
Program Expense/Total Expenses 72% 71% 16%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 11% 20% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $289,460 -- --
Current Assets $287,442 -- --
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- --
Current Liabilities $70,272 -- --
Total Net Assets $219,188 -- --

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.09 -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

INP has developed a flexible financial model to cover participant cost. Participating organizations currently pay $3,200-3,800 per student, and this student tuition revenue comprises about 33% of our operating budget. We believe that INP will need the continuing support of private foundations to ensure the program’s affordability. Without this support, students and their nonprofit organizations will bear the cost directly.

INP has reached out to several new funding sources for the FY18 year, including small family foundations and a new individual donor campaign. We expect the campaign to be successful in raising additional capital for future program development. 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s for FY16 and per the nonprofit's records for FY15 and FY14. This organization changed its name in 2016 to The Institute for Nonprofit Practice (INP) as indicated in the name change letter included above.
 
INP received its nonprofit status from the IRS in September 2015, per the IRS Letter of Determination posted above. INP is affiliated with Tufts University's Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service, which grants Certificates for INP's major programs. From 2014 to September 2015, INP was fiscally sponsored by the United Way of Massachusetts Bay Inc. The INP program was previously a part of Boston University's Executive Leadership Center, from 2008 - 2014.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

In the short-term, it is our goal to increase the effectiveness, connectedness, and diversity of nonprofit leadership in the regions we serve: Greater Boston, the Merrimack Valley, and Providence, Rhode Island. In the long-term, we work to make the nonprofit sector more effective by addressing the following systemic challenges:

· Lack of formal education and training in nonprofit leadership leading to inefficiency, turnover, and decreased impact

· Insufficient pipeline to fill leadership positions as they become vacant

· A detrimental lack of diversity at in top leadership positions

· The isolation of mostly small nonprofits, minimizing their impact

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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