Share |

Justice At Work

 11 Arlington Street
 Boston, MA 02116
[P] (857) 237-0984
[F] (617) 995-0910
www.jatwork.org
[email protected]
-- --
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 2011
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 27-4670409

LAST UPDATED: 01/30/2015
Organization DBA Justice At Work
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

Justice At Work supports and encourages low-wage immigrant worker organizing by meeting the legal needs of immigrant worker centers--community-based labor organizations that organize, educate and advocate on behalf of immigrant workers. Justice At Work provides a mixture of employment/labor-related and organizational legal support, including education, trainings, referrals and representation. With Justice at Work’s involvement, these worker centers can best develop leadership and organize immigrant workers to address wage theft, unsafe conditions, discrimination, harassment and illegal retaliation. Justice At Work partners with worker centers that are members of the Immigrant Worker Center Collaborative (IWCC), which engages the three largest immigrant communities in MA (Latino, Brazilian, and Chinese), in order to bolster a broader movement that will have the power to affect public discourse and policy.

Mission Statement

Justice At Work supports and encourages low-wage immigrant worker organizing by meeting the legal needs of immigrant worker centers--community-based labor organizations that organize, educate and advocate on behalf of immigrant workers. Justice At Work provides a mixture of employment/labor-related and organizational legal support, including education, trainings, referrals and representation. With Justice at Work’s involvement, these worker centers can best develop leadership and organize immigrant workers to address wage theft, unsafe conditions, discrimination, harassment and illegal retaliation. Justice At Work partners with worker centers that are members of the Immigrant Worker Center Collaborative (IWCC), which engages the three largest immigrant communities in MA (Latino, Brazilian, and Chinese), in order to bolster a broader movement that will have the power to affect public discourse and policy.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $117,500.00
Projected Expense $117,310.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Legal Counsel to the Immigrant Worker Center Collaborative (IWCC)
  • Legal Services for Worker Members and Staff of Immigrant Worker Centers
  • Legal Support to Immigrant Worker Centers
  • Small Claims Project

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Justice At Work supports and encourages low-wage immigrant worker organizing by meeting the legal needs of immigrant worker centers--community-based labor organizations that organize, educate and advocate on behalf of immigrant workers. Justice At Work provides a mixture of employment/labor-related and organizational legal support, including education, trainings, referrals and representation. With Justice at Work’s involvement, these worker centers can best develop leadership and organize immigrant workers to address wage theft, unsafe conditions, discrimination, harassment and illegal retaliation. Justice At Work partners with worker centers that are members of the Immigrant Worker Center Collaborative (IWCC), which engages the three largest immigrant communities in MA (Latino, Brazilian, and Chinese), in order to bolster a broader movement that will have the power to affect public discourse and policy.

Background Statement

Justice At Work was incorporated on February 9, 2011, for the purpose of educating and advocating on behalf of low-wage workers whose workplace rights are often violated. Justice At Work is led by Executive Director Thomas Smith and a Board of attorneys and worker center directors (including Ingrid Nava, in-house counsel of SEIU 615, Omar Angel-Perez, director of the Workplace Project, Lydia Lowe, director of the Chinese Progressive Association and Rachel Rosenbloom, immigration professor at Northeastern University School of Law). Attorney Smith founded Justice At Work after graduating from Georgetown Law and completing a two-year Skadden Fellowship project in support of immigrant worker centers at Greater Boston Legal Services. He staffs Justice At Work with a mixture of part-time consultants, fellows, and student interns. He is fluent in both Spanish and Portuguese. 

The idea for Justice At Work grew over the course of Smith's 2-year fellowship with GBLS. It primarily emerged from dialogue with co-founder and board president Ingrid Nava, who was Smith's supervisor at GBLS.  Nava and Smith shared Justice At Work's foundational belief that true change occurs when people who are most affected by oppression are the main actors in undoing oppression.  Justice At Work emerged as the legal model that embodied such a belief.  During his time at GBLS, Smith also took inspiration from two long-time organizers in the Boston area who told him that Justice At Work was needed, two clients who donated their monetary recovery to his future effort, and his visit to the Working Hands Legal Clinic in Chicago, where he studied a similar model.

Impact Statement

Fiscal Year 2012 (7/1/11-6/30/12): 1) Represented the Centro Comunitario de Trabajadores (CCT) of New Bedford in its negotiations with temp agency, Employment On Demand (EDA), as CCT signed an agreement with EDA to ensure that all workers who are placed in employment via EDA are given vacation time and have all state and federal workplace rights protected, including those incorporated in the proposed REAL Bill, which is pending at the State House and would regulate the temp industry in Massachusetts.  2) Launched our Small Claims Project in July, 2011, with a training on wage and hour law and the small claims process for staff of nine immigrant worker centers.  In 12 months, we have filed over 20 cases in over 10 district courts throughout Eastern Massachusetts and have obtained over $50,000 in earned wages for workers. 3) Partnered with the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health and a leading labor and employment law firm to obtain a settlement of almost $46,000 for five undocumented workers who had been receiving less than minimum wages for years.  4) Met our fundraising goals for our first year of operation, including raising approximately $33,500 in donations from over 175 individuals and law firms.

Fiscal Year 2013 Goals (7/1/12-6/30/13): 1) Provide legal orientation and on-going support to the newly elected worker board of directors of CCT, which gained 501(c)(3) status at the start of 2012.  2) Meet fundraising goals to provide a competitive legal services' salary to the director and hire a part-time paralegal/outreach worker. With the receipt of a Miller Foundation grant of $35,000, we are more than a third there.  3) In the Small Claims Project, we plan to: a) provide a second training for non-attorney advocates and workers; b) obtain $75,000 for workers; and c) create a bench memo on wage and hour law for magistrate judges.  4) Strengthen organizational fundraising capacity by creating and maintaining a support committee that will complement the Board of Directors.

Needs Statement

1) Pro-bono and "low-bono" wage and hour, discrimination and workers' compensation attorneys who have the cultural and linguistic capacity, as well as the economic flexibility, to represent low-wage immigrant workers.

2) Increased general operating funding to enable us to have two full-time staff to meet the needs of the immigrant worker centers we serve.  We need ~$30,000 above our projected income for fiscal year 2013 to fulfill our staffing needs.
 
3) Database development, so we have an effective tool to track our cases and generate reports for the Board, partners and funders.  This would cost ~$7,500 to hire a professional IT consultant. 
 
4) Event planner to alleviate the stress on staff of planning and executing our annual fundraising event.

CEO Statement

 

The bold idea of Justice at Work is that by serving immigrant worker organizations, instead of focusing on individual immigrant workers (although they also will be served), Justice at Work can support and promote industry-wide, administrative, and political change. In the New England region, as is the case in much of the country, immigrant worker organizations have been served primarily by legal aid because it is not economically feasible for the private bar to meet the need. However, legal aid is often unwilling or restricted from providing counsel to organizations. In addition, individual worker center members are often turned away because legal aid is overwhelmed serving the general population, or because income and documentation issues make them ineligible (e.g. GBLS serves clients at or below 125% of the federal poverty line, which excludes many working poor, and RILS is restricted by LSC funding.) Justice at Work will succeed because it fills this critical void. Justice At Work hopes that with its support, in 5-10 years worker centers and their members will be empowered to organize in ways—including policy and industry-specific campaigns as well as worker-led employment alternatives. 

Unlike traditional non-profits that are dependent solely on foundation grants and individual contributions, we will generate income through“case-based” income. This will include court-awarded attorney fees, given that wage and hour law provides a fee-shifting scheme, whereby a defendant employer must pay the attorney fees of the prevailing plaintiff.  It will also receive referral fees on wage and hour and workplace injury cases that Justice at Work refers to private attorneys.  Finally, Justice at Work will be able to receive cy pres awards from class actions won by allied attorneys who support our mission.

Board Chair Statement

Justice At Work has had numerous successes in the early stage of our operation.  Worker centers have responded positively to our new resource.  Justice At Work's legal services and the organizing and education work of the community organizations has proven a powerful combination.  As a co-founder of this organization, I am thrilled to see it fulfilling some of the hopes I imagined at this stage of its development.

 
The executive director has detailed many of our early successes, so I would like to elaborate more on the challenges we face.  I believe the number one challenge of Justice and Work is to strike a balance between being responsive to the needs of the worker center organizations and being strategic/forward-thinking rather than reactive.  There are almost no organizations nationally that specifically set out to provide legal services to immigrant worker organizations and fewer still who view their primary goal as serving the needs of those organizations--in order to achieve the primary goal of promoting and encouraging organizing.      
 
Because this type of collaboration between Justice and Work and the client organizations we serves is new, both client and advocate are learning how best to make that relationship work.  There is a tendency for the organizations to ask for the same services they might get from any lawyer – just to ask for more of it.  For example, requests for intakes, know-your-rights talks, and taking on of more individual cases abound.  Justice at Work could fill up 100% of our available time doing this but leave the organizations we serve in much the same position they already were in as far as their ability to make real change.
 
Justice At Work is trying to address this by creating a collaborative relationship with worker centers.  Justice at Work is working with the organizations at the appropriate level of planning, so that we know what services to offer and projects to create, but still allowing the organizations autonomy to set their own agendas.  The Small Claims Project--which will attempt to find redress for individuals but also systemically respond to the larger issue of wage theft that the community organizations are trying to organize around--is an example of this kind of thinking.    
 
I volunteer my time and energy for Justice At Work because I think it fills a void in immigrant worker advocacy.  In order for immigrant worker centers locally to develop and make positive change, they need support.  Justice at Work can provide a unique kind of support that will help them thrive, thus becoming a vital element in the fight for immigrant worker justice.


Geographic Area Served

STATEWIDE

Eastern MA and RI, with partner organizations throughout Boston, and in Somerville, Lynn, Lawrence, Framingham, New Bedford and Central Falls, RI.

Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Alliances & Advocacy
  2. Employment - Alliances & Advocacy
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Legal Counsel to the Immigrant Worker Center Collaborative (IWCC)

Justice At Work supports the IWCC, which is a multi-ethnic coalition of eight immigrant worker centers in Eastern MA and RI that organize, educate and advocate on behalf of Brazilian, Latino and Chinese worker communities.
Budget  26,550
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Immigrants' Rights
Population Served Migrant Workers Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Program Long-Term Success  Justice At Work's legal support of the IWCC will enable the collaborative to more successfully support each of its organizational members and more strategically advance the campaigns and policy goals of the IWCC.
Program Success Monitored By  Justice At Work monitors the success of its interaction with the IWCC by conversations with workers, who are members of IWCC groups, and with the staff of IWCC groups.  Justice At Work staff and board, which includes the director of the Chinese Progressive Association, a leading member of the IWCC, discuss Justice At Work's relationship with the IWCC at each board meeting.
Examples of Program Success  Since Justice At Work has become involved with the IWCC, the IWCC organizational members have collaborated to draft a Worker Bill of Rights, which is a declaration of the rights that all workers should enjoy as articulated by the worker members of the IWCC organizations.  The Worker Bill of Rights will serve as a defining document for the IWCC and will guide future collaborative campaign work.

Legal Services for Worker Members and Staff of Immigrant Worker Centers

Justice At Work provides training, education, advice, referrals and direct representation for workers and staff of immigrant worker centers.  Workers contact immigrant worker centers daily with cases of wage theft, workplace accidents, discrimination, sexual harassment, illegal retaliation and other work-related abuses.  Justice At Work trains the staff and workers of the worker centers on workplace rights and, when necessary, performs legal in-takes with workers.  When a legal claim exists, Justice At Work provides a variety of services depending on the workers' interests.  We help workers file complaints with government agencies, such as the Department of Labor or Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination.  We also help workers find a workers' compensation or discrimination attorney.  Or, when appropriate, we represent workers directly.  
Budget  $25,000
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Immigrants' Rights
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Migrant Workers Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Short-term, Justice At Work's legal support will help worker centers respond to workplace complaints in a more informed manner, and the community will trust and respect the worker center.  Further, a bridge will be built to span an alarming gap that currently exists between the most vulnerable workers and the legal resources that do exist--whether they be at Justice At Work or government agencies and/or private firms.
Program Long-Term Success  By providing a variety of legal services to worker center staff and members, Justice At Work hopes that immigrant worker communities will be more aware of their rights and how to access justice and employers will face the consequences of their bad acts, thus deterring further violations.
Program Success Monitored By  Justice At Work tracks all of its training, in-take, advice, referrals and direct representation.  In its first year of operation, it served over 100 workers who arrived to worker centers with workplace complaints.  
Examples of Program Success  Through a mixture of referring cases to government agencies and private attorneys (and then acting as a liaison with those entities), and direct representation, Justice At Work has recovered over $225,000 for workers.

Legal Support to Immigrant Worker Centers

Justice At Work partners directly with immigrant worker centers, which are member-led community-based labor organizations in immigrant communities, in order to provide legal support to the organizations themselves.
Budget  $15,500
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Immigrants' Rights
Population Served Migrant Workers Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  In the short-term, Justice At Work's support will enable a group, such as the Centro Comunitario de Trabajadores in New Bedford, to successfully take on its newly acquired 501(c)(3) status, define and communicate to its members the by-laws, train its worker-run board on the rights and responsibilities of board members, and interact successfully with government agencies and employers.
Program Long-Term Success  Justice At Work's support of immigrant worker centers will help enable the centers to overcome the problems that threaten their success, such as being under-resourced, overwhelmed by the needs of the community and lacking in infrastructure and institutional knowledge to maintain a long-term, effective presence.  Justice At Work hopes to see established worker centers that meet the needs of the most vulnerable workers in all immigrant communities of the region.
Program Success Monitored By  While a center's success will not be dependent upon Justice At Work's legal support, we will measure the efficiency of our resource investment by the ability of a partner worker center to achieve a stable presence in the community that enables it to fulfill its mission.
Examples of Program Success  The worker center with which Justice At Work has been working most closely in this regard has defined its bylaws through a process facilitated by Justice At Work and has elected its first all-worker board of directors.  A date has been set for Justice At Work to provide a training to the new board on its rights and responsibilities.

Small Claims Project

The Small Claims Project aims to combat wage-theft, which is crippling low-wage worker immigrant communities, by accessing small claims courts to litigate various kinds of wage and hour violations. Partnering with the IWCC, the Small Claims Project secures representation for, or undertakes direct representation of, workers referred by worker centers. In order for workers to recognize when their rights have been violated and empower them to pursue justice directly, the Project trains organizers and workers about their rights and how to use the courts to redress violations of those rights. The Project will also train judges and court personnel on wage-and-hour law, since small claims courts have not traditionally seen these kinds of actions, while monitoring the courts to ensure interpretation is provided. The Project also will collect and report data about the extent and prevalence of wage-theft for further advocacy purposes.  
Budget  29,640
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Immigrants' Rights
Population Served Migrant Workers Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  A short term goal is to obtain wages for 100 workers by representation in small claims courts by the end of 2012.  In just the last part of 2011, which was Justice At Work’s first year of operation, 30 workers were referred to Justice At Work for this kind of assistance.  In September, 2012, Justice At Work will hold a training for worker center staff and workers.  And later in 2012, Justice At Work will create an educational memo and conduct a training for judges and court personnel to familiarize them with wage and hour law and with the barriers low-wage worker litigants face. 
Program Long-Term Success  Through representing immigrant workers, training workers and worker center staff on the small claims process, and educating court personnel to ensure access to justice, Justice At Work will make small claims court an effective tool for combating “wage theft."  Longer term, as worker centers and workers become more experienced in pursuing remedies on their own, the Small Claims Project will perform less representation but will continue to monitor courts and advise on cases.  The project also will serve to support worker center organizing and advocacy efforts as the IWCC will be able to use the data the project generates to capture the extent of wage theft.
Program Success Monitored By  Justice At Work tracks all wage theft claims that are referred by worker centers, including any cases that are filed in court, the judgments rendered and any money recovered for the clients.  Justice At Work also tracks the number of worker center staff and workers, as well as court personnel, trained.  Success ultimately will be measured by the number of worker center staff and workers who are able to access small claims courts directly in order to obtain stolen wages.
Examples of Program Success  Justice At Work launched the Small Claims Project in July, 2011, with a training on wage and hour law and the small claims process for staff of nine immigrant worker centers.  In 12 months, we have filed over 20 cases in over 10 district courts throughout Eastern Massachusetts and have obtained over $50,000 wages for low-wage workers and their families.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Thomas L. Smith Esq.
CEO Term Start Feb 2011
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Executive Director Thomas Smith graduated from Georgetown University Law Center in 2008 and is a member of the Massachusetts and Federal bars. From 2008-2010, as part of a Skadden Fellowship project, he supported Boston-area immigrant worker centers as an attorney with Greater Boston Legal Services’ Employment Unit. Tom represented low-wage workers in wage and hour and unemployment benefits cases, as well as advising and referring them in discrimination, sexual harassment, vacation/leave, and workplace injury cases. He was awarded

the Health Tech/Legal Champion of the Year award from MassCOSH’s worker center in the Fall of 2010. Tom is fluent in Spanish and Portuguese thanks to his extensive work, study, and travel in Latin America and his work with migrant communities in the United States.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 8
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 1
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? N/A
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A

Governance


Board Chair Ms Ingrid Nava Esq
Board Chair Company Affiliation SEIU 615
Board Chair Term Feb 2011 - Feb 2013
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr Omar Angel Workplace Project (Long Island, NY), Dir; Center to Support Immigrant Organizing(Boston), Organizer Voting
Ms Lydia Lowe Chinese Progressive Association , Exec. Dir. Voting
Ms Ingrid Nava Esq. SEIU 615, House Counsel Voting
Prof. Rachel Rosenbloom Esq. Northeastern University School of Law Voting
Mr Thomas L. Smith Esq Justice At Work Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 3
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 92%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 60%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 60%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The inaugural board of Justice At Work offers great insight into the world of low-wage immigrant worker advocacy.  In terms of advice and guidance on the programmatic work, Justice At Work staff is well-supported.  However, as with many start-up non-profits, a major challenge for Justice At Work's board and staff is finding on-going funding to support our programs.  We were fortunate to receive initial funding from Skadden and Yale University to launch the organization, which helped us meet our funding goals through fiscal year 2012.  Now that we are in fiscal year 2013, we must find foundations that believe in us over the long-term, individual donors who see the fruits of their giving, and we must generate a continuous stream of income through our programs.  The latter piece of the funding puzzle is slowly coming together, as a number of cases that come through immigrant worker centers generate legal fees--either through our direct representation or referral fees when private attorneys make a profit on cases we send them.  Last week, we settled a case on behalf of five workers who were not paid minimum wage for years that will generate $5,500 in revenue for Justice At Work.  To strengthen our ability to generate foundation and individual donor contributions, we have initiated a support development committee, which includes one board member as well as outside volunteers who have experience in non-profit fundraising.  This committee helps our staff craft smart fundraising strategies, including identifying and approaching foundations as well as organizing events.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $117,500.00
Projected Expense $117,310.00
Form 990s --
Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year -- -- --
Total Revenue -- -- --
Total Expenses -- -- --

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year -- -- --
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions -- -- --
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year -- -- --
Program Expense -- -- --
Administration Expense -- -- --
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses -- -- --
Program Expense/Total Expenses -- -- --
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue -- -- --

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year -- -- --
Total Assets -- -- --
Current Assets -- -- --
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities -- -- --
Total Net Assets -- -- --

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year -- -- --
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year -- -- --
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year -- -- --
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets -- -- --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Because Justice At Work was founded in 2011 and had such a small budget in fiscal year 2012, we have yet to have to prepare a Form 990.  Our first Form 990 will be prepared at the end of 2012.
 
To help launch Justice At Work in the right direction, we hired two former corporate professionals through ESC to help us develop a business plan.  The ESC consultants guided Justice At Work's executive director in determining the target size of Justice At Work and a three-year plan to arrive at such capacity.  Justice At Work is currently developing according to this business plan. 

Foundation Comments

Justice At Work was founded in 2011. Financial documents will be posted as they become available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

--

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--