Share |

Starlight Children’s Foundation New England

 Starlight New England, 529 Main Street, Suite 608
 Charlestown, MA 02129
[P] (617) 241-9911
[F] (617) 241-0066
http://www.starlight.org/newengland
[email protected]
-- --
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1983
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 95-3802159

LAST UPDATED: 08/14/2014
Organization DBA --
Former Names Starlight Starbright Children's Foundation (2004)
The Starbright Foundation (1991)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

When a child or teenager has a serious medical condition, everyone in the family is affected. The kids, their parents and siblings struggle, in different ways, to grapple with the intrusion of illness or serious injury into their lives. Starlight understands what families go through when a child is sick, and how important it is for families to find relief from constant worry and isolation. Our entertainment, education and family activity programs have been proven to distract children from their pain, help them better understand and manage their illnesses, and connect families facing similar challenges so that no one feels alone.

Mission Statement

When a child or teenager has a serious medical condition, everyone in the family is affected. The kids, their parents and siblings struggle, in different ways, to grapple with the intrusion of illness or serious injury into their lives. Starlight understands what families go through when a child is sick, and how important it is for families to find relief from constant worry and isolation. Our entertainment, education and family activity programs have been proven to distract children from their pain, help them better understand and manage their illnesses, and connect families facing similar challenges so that no one feels alone.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2012 to Dec 31, 2012
Projected Income $313,100.00
Projected Expense $284,823.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Fun Center Mobile Entertainment Units
  • Great Escapes Family Activities
  • Starbright World online social network

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

When a child or teenager has a serious medical condition, everyone in the family is affected. The kids, their parents and siblings struggle, in different ways, to grapple with the intrusion of illness or serious injury into their lives. Starlight understands what families go through when a child is sick, and how important it is for families to find relief from constant worry and isolation. Our entertainment, education and family activity programs have been proven to distract children from their pain, help them better understand and manage their illnesses, and connect families facing similar challenges so that no one feels alone.

Background Statement

Starlight Children’s Foundation was founded in 1987. In 2004, Starlight merged with the Starbright Foundation, which had been in existence since 1991. Starlight and Starbright were each founded by Peter Samuelson (with help from Steven Spielberg in the case of Starbright and Emma Samms in the case of Starlight) to empower and improve the quality of life for seriously ill children — Starlight through high-touch events and activities and Starbright through high-tech entertainment, education and communication tools. Since the two organizations shared core goals, served the same population and had a founder in common, they decided to combine their efforts. Between 2004-2008, the organization operated under the name Starlight Starbright Children’s Foundation. In 2008, to simplify the name and unify with its international affiliates, the organization officially changed its name to Starlight Children’s Foundation.
 
In 2007, Starlight New England transitioned from an independent chapter to a regional office of the national organization.  As part of the national organization, Starlight New England is supported by administrative resources of the global office, allowing the local entity to redirect its energies to growing critical programs and fundraising with the ultimate goal to become self-sufficient.
 
In 2011, Starlight New England became 100% self-sufficient. We continue to receive administrative support from the Global Office (human resources, accounting, audit support, etc.); however, we do not pay for those resources. Instead, Starlight New England is able to focus on program growth and expansion of services within the region.
 

Impact Statement

Since 2001 children with special health care needs has steadily increased, today more than 13%, roughly 10 million children under 18 years of age face special health care needs. The lives of these children and their families are deeply affected. Most Starlight children and families are affected by illness for a lifetime; even when the children have recovered from an acute illness, latent effects from treatment and disease often leave them impaired and impacted for life.
 
Furthermore, the impact of chronic and life-threatening illness extends beyond the pediatric patient to affect entire families—causing financial crisis, strained relationships, and physical and mental health issues for those who love and care for the child diagnosed with the disease. Parents are fearful and overwhelmed by ongoing family and work obligations, while siblings feel lonely, abandoned, or alternately envious of the attention paid to the sick child and guilty for those feelings. All too often Starlight hears from new families entering the program that they feel cut off from the outside world and isolated by their circumstances.
 
Few organizations provide children with strategies, programs and services that enable them to cope with the challenging daily demands of serious illness; even fewer provide support services that continue beyond hospital stays, one-time special events, or extend to the family.
Great Escapes have been designed as a direct response to the needs of seriously ill children and their families. Families have openly shared and have repeatedly stressed the intrinsic value of the Great Escapes and we have translated that information into a valuable community-based respite program.
 

Needs Statement

As a result of Starlight’s unique program and underserved audience, Starlight continues to expand program participation, and over the past three years has welcomed more than 250 new families (more than 1,100 new children and family members!) to the New England Great Escapes program.The number of families on wait-lists for events has increased significantly.This growth demonstrates obvious and urgent need for programs that alleviate sick children’s isolation, and for family support programs that help parents and siblings meet other families, have regular socialization opportunities, and identify sources of mutual support to help cope with life with a severely ill child. Starlight’s Great Escapes program is time-tested and proven to help alleviate some of the stress associated with the myriad impacts of serious illness—overwhelming isolation, financial burdens, and information deficiency or overload—and allow children and their families to better focus on the child’s health and recovery.
 
To continue to serve the children and families that need us today and those that will come to need us in the future, Starlight must continue to grow its local Great Escapes program.

CEO Statement

--

Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
CENTRAL REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE

Starlight New England serves seriously ill children and their families in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont and Rhode Island. The majority of our community-based programs are in and around the Greater Boston area.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Services
  2. Human Services -
  3. Recreation & Sports - Community Recreational Centers

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Fun Center Mobile Entertainment Units

Fun Center mobile entertainment units include a Nintendo Wii™ gaming system, a DVD player, and a Sharp AQUOS™ LCD television. Their design allows kids, even those who aren’t able to leave their beds or who have limited motion, to play with ease. Fun Centers roll right up to the side of young patients’ beds or anywhere in a hospital setting, making them perfect for hospitalized children in numerous situations: anticipating surgery, during long outpatient clinic treatments, waiting in the emergency room or fighting loneliness after visiting hours have ended.
Budget  $2,605,666.00
Category  Health Care Patient & Family Support
Population Served Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
Program Short-Term Success  Each year, we hope to place several hundred new Fun Center mobile entertaimnet units in hospitals in need. Between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2008, Starlight and our generous supporters donated 395 Fun Centers to hospitals throughout the United States and Canada, which will serve an additional 14,220 children every month. 
Program Long-Term Success 

Starlight and its generous donors have placed more than 5,500 Fun Centers in hospitals throughout North America but the list of hospitals still waiting for units remains long. Our goal is for every pediatric patient to have access to the therapeutic benefits Fun Centers provide.

Program Success Monitored By  Starlight regularly surveys hospital staff to determine the efficacy of the Fun Center program.
Examples of Program Success 
 "Our patients love the new Fun Centers,” says Georgetown University Hospital Child Life Specialist, Linda Mi-Young Kim. “The variety of pre-loaded games makes Fun Centers perfect for the little ones and the teens too! A few weeks ago, I had two teen patients, one fighting cancer and the other receiving treatment for a kidney condition, who were upset that they were on the pediatric floor with ‘all the babies.’ They bonded during a heated Fun Center competition, and became fast friends. So we moved them into a double room for the duration of their stay. That Fun Center helped them not only transform their apprehension into laughter, but also to connect with one another — two things that help in the healing process.”
 
Fun Centers make a real difference for families too,” adds Linda. “When siblings come in, they climb right into bed with their brother or sister and play together — it really helps them feel at ease and find a little bit of normalcy during a difficult time. I even had one father who played while waiting in his son’s room for him to return from a five-hour surgery. He was so grateful to have something to do to keep his mind off his fears.”

Great Escapes Family Activities

Starlight’s Great Escapes family activities provide families with recreational opportunities and a chance to have fun together away from the hospital so they can regroup, make special memories together and return home with a renewed sense of strength and hope. The events also forge important connections between families struggling with similar issues so that no one feels alone. At Great Escapes, children partake in all types of activities, including those that they enjoyed prior to their illness and new activities they are experiencing for the first time.
Budget  $107,068
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Other Health/Disability Families
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success 
Starlight serves children and teens 3-18 suffering
from chronic or life-threatening medical conditions, which may include cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, heart disease, asthma, kidney disease, burn injuries, and spinal cord injuries. The children and families we serve comprise a diverse gender, racial, ethnic, and socio-economic mix; we serve all equally without regard to demographics.

Great Escapes have been designed as a direct response to the needs of seriously ill children and their families. Families have openly shared and have repeatedly stressed the intrinsic value of the Great Escapes and we have translated that information into a valuable community-based respite program.As a result of Starlight’s unique program
and underserved audience, Starlight continues to expand program participation, and over the past three years has welcomed more than 250 new families (more than 1,100 new children and family members!) to the New England Great Escapes program.
The number of families on wait-lists for events has increased significantly.This growth demonstrates
obvious and urgent need for programs that alleviate sick children’s isolation, and for family support programs that help parents and siblings meet other families, have regular socialization opportunities, and identify sources of mutual support to help cope with life with a severely ill child. Starlight’s Great Escapes program is time-tested and proven to help alleviate some of the stress associated with the myriad impacts of serious illness—overwhelming isolation, financial burdens, and information deficiency or overload—and allow children and their families to better focus on the child’s health and recovery.
Program Success Monitored By 

Starlight measures its success monthly via program reports where program staff include a full review of the month’s activities, number of participants served, amount spent and changes in program enrollment. Attached is our most recent monthly report that shows monthly progress and a complete review of program metrics for the past ten months.

Additionally, Starlight families receive event evaluation surveys after each event. These surveys help us gauge the success of the event and give feedback to help us improve. Families also provide information on what events they’d like to see in the future. We review these evaluations each month and tailor future events to help meet the needs of our families.

Examples of Program Success 

Family Responses:

"IT WASAWESOME. My older 2 daughters end up doing a lot for my youngest one. For all 3 to be rewarded by Santa was very heartwarming. Even my 14 year old turned 4 in
front of him and the 3 bonded stress free. We were lucky that Ashvarika's health cooperated because in her condition she freezes up without warning and we have to resort to our plan B. Everything was stellar!!!!!!!!!!!!!!" – A Starlight Parent

"Starlight is really heaven sent in relieving the daily stress from sickness, infusions,
insurance companies and never ending hospital visits. I am surprised that
something like this even exists... the experiences have truly changed our lives and I feel that my children are being compensated for things we have missed in the past years. Although not being sick would be the best event ...Every place we have been invited to has been out of this world for them and we are so grateful. Thank You for adding joy and excitement in our lives!!!" – A Starlight Parent

Starbright World online social network

Whether it is because seriously ill teens are in-and-out of the hospital or stuck at home, or because people often don’t know how to relate or are fearful once a friend has been diagnosed, most teens with a chronic or life-threatening illness feel very alone with no one to talk to.

The goal of Starlight’s Starbright World® online social network for seriously ill teens and their teen-aged siblings is to connect kids who are going through similar experiences so that no one feels alone. Members chat; document their stories; journal their thoughts; express themselves through photos and personalized profiles; describe their experiences; and have fun participating in contests and playing games. The site is professionally moderated by Starlight staff.

Budget  $339,971.00
Category  Health Care Patient & Family Support
Population Served Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2008 the Starbright World community grew to include more than 4,000 members. These teens logged more than 3 million activity hits across the site each time they posted or read blogs and bulletins, sent messages, added friends to their buddy lists or connected in the chat room.
Program Long-Term Success 

Our goal is to ensure that every teen with a chronic or life-threatening illness is aware that Starbright World exists as a resource for friendship and support.

Program Success Monitored By 

Starlight surveys the teen members of  Starbright World annually to collect input about the site and possible improvements. We also convene ongoing member focus groups to discuss features, functionality, design and content

Starlight also engaged the Fielding Graduate Institute to conduct a formal program evaluation and research study.

Examples of Program Success 

“It's so hard for other people to understand what you're feeling when you are very sick. But with my friends on Starbright World, I didn't have to explain,” says Alyssa, a former Starbright World member and current chat host. “It was such an amazing feeling to be able to escape through the Internet into this world where I could laugh, be myself and find support. The friends I made on Starbright World will be among my closest friends for the rest of my life.”

A recent Starbright World exchange in the chat room echoed the same feelings:

Member1: I just want to say that I love you all! You guys on here make me feel so much better when I am down! I am so happy and blessed to know all of you! Thanks for being a good friend to me and I hope all of you are feeling great!
Member2: Life seems hard at times but with you guys I can get through anything.
Member1: Totally
Member2: We are a community of very strong willed people. We are Sparta!
Member1: LOL. Yes we are.
Member2: No wait, we're SBWers! Throws arms in the air*!*
Member3: haha. I love you guys!
Member2: LOL. I love you guys too!
 
 

“I am grateful that there are kids on Starbright World who understand what I’m going through. Of course, friends and family are supportive, but with kids who are going through the same kinds of things as I am, there is a different level of understanding,” says Starbright World member Nakita. “A few weeks ago, I was feeling pretty awful because I had developed polycystic ovarian syndrome. Another Starbright World teen also had experienced POS, and we talked for a long time about how much it hurts. Of course, my pain didn’t go away, but it was really comforting to know that I wasn’t the only one on the planet going through what I was going through.

“It also feels really good to be able to help another teen who is having a tough time,” she continues. “A lot of kids on Starbright World are missing friends in the real world. But whether we are in the hospital or stuck at home, we can log-on anytime and connect with our Starbright World friends -- friends who we can count on to be there for the long haul, through all the ups and downs.”


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Jacqueline Hart-Ibrahim
CEO Term Start Nov 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Jacqueline Hart-Ibrahim comes to Starlight with 22 years of experience in the financial sector in roles that included Division General Manager at Household International, SVP/Group Head at Wells Fargo and SVP at Neuberger Berman.

Ibrahim holds a bachelor’s degree in Political Science with an emphasis in international political economy from UC Berkeley. She further earned an MBA in global management and a doctorate in organizational leadership. Additionally, Ibrahim holds a Certificate in Fund Raising Management from Indiana University and a Certificate in Positive Business and Society Change from Case Western Reserve University.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Joan Ford Hilton VP, Regions and Programs --
Bill Misenheimer VP, Finance and Administration --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 25
Number of Part Time Staff 20
Number of Volunteers 500
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 4
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 4

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Roger Shiffman
Board Chair Company Affiliation Zizzle, LLC
Board Chair Term Apr 2009 - Mar 2012
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Laura Brand Amgen Voting
Russ Cashdan Kaye Scholer LLP Voting
Sheldon Davis Regal Confections Voting
Scott Dorman Extreme Sports Camp Voting
Mary R. Falvey Wyndham Worldwide Corporation Voting
Henry M. Fields Morrison & Foerster LLP Voting
Ken Forkos CPA Voting
David Getson g-Net Media Voting
Brian Gott Variety Voting
Tom Gregg MacGregor Capital LLC Voting
Pearl Grimes MD Vitiligo and Pigmentation Institute of Southern California Voting
Sarah Grover California Pizza Kitchen Voting
Becky Gutrich No Affiliation Voting
David K. Haspel Haspel Communications, Inc. Voting
Tim Herron Lauralex LLC Voting
Dave Hubinger Nestlé Brands Company Voting
Karen Shishino Jordan No affiliation Voting
Millie Judge Lighthouse Natural Resource Consulting Voting
Russell Karlins No Affiliation Voting
Dr. Prerna Mona Khanna MD, MPH US Health Record Voting
Judy Lee DC, LaC Starlight Mother Voting
Ronald Leibow Kaye Scholer LLP Voting
Marvin Levy DreamWorks Studios Voting
Kevin A. Mayer The Walt Disney Company Voting
Hannah Minghella Sony Pictures Animation Voting
Sonya D. Naar Attorneys' Liability Assurance Society Voting
Elaine Paul The Walt Disney Company Voting
Brandon L. Phillips MD Mayo Clinic Voting
Gary Rachelefsky MD UCLA School of Medicine Voting
Jane Ritson-Parsons Hasbro Inc. Voting
John Rosenberg g-Net Media Voting
Peter Samuelson Samuelson Productions Voting
Carol A. Savoie Deloitte & Touche LLP Voting
Roger Shiffman Zizzle, LLC Voting
John Simone The Colgate-Palmolive Company Voting
Robert Steinberg Latham & Watkins LLP Voting
Patricia Sundgren US Bank, Retired Voting
John Swisher Ronin Advertising Group Voting
Charles J. Weber Weber Communications, Inc. Voting
Joseph Wessely Dime Savings Bank Voting
Troy A. Young CFP Destiny Financial Group, Inc. Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 33
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 2
Gender Female: 15
Male: 28
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 56%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 95%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2012 to Dec 31, 2012
Projected Income $313,100.00
Projected Expense $284,823.00
Form 990s

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Revenue $324,193 $241,371 $199,841
Total Expenses $322,414 $324,997 $333,170

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$188,211 $91,880 $59,725
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $33,065 $12,772 $24,814
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- $613
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $17,017 $33,654 $14,565
Revenue In-Kind $85,900 $103,065 $100,124
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Program Expense $215,227 $207,834 $188,487
Administration Expense $39,175 $33,040 $31,239
Fundraising Expense $68,011 $84,122 $113,444
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.01 0.74 0.60
Program Expense/Total Expenses 67% 64% 57%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 29% 61% 114%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Assets -- -- --
Current Assets -- -- --
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities -- -- --
Total Net Assets -- -- --

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Starlight Children's Foundation New England is a regional office of Starlight Starbright Children's Foundation; this regional office does not have independent 990s or audits. Starlight Children's Foundation New England provided their own numbers for financial analysis. The regional office filed its own 990s until 2008, at which time, the regional office became a part of the national office under their tax exemption due to the financial downturn. Starlight Children's Foundation New England  now files under Starlight Starbright Children's Foundation with the EIN: 95-3802159.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

--

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--