Share |

Future Chefs (fiscally sponsored by Third Sector New England, Inc.)

 Future Chefs, 560 Albany Street
 Boston, MA 02118
[P] (617) 4513883
[F] (617) 4513338
www.futurechefs.net
[email protected]
Toni Elka
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1960
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2261109

LAST UPDATED: 08/14/2018
Organization DBA Future Chefs
FC
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Future Chefs prepares teens for successful life and work after high school.

Mission Statement

Future Chefs prepares teens for successful life and work after high school.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2018 to Sept 30, 2019
Projected Income $836,698.00
Projected Expense $836,600.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. FC Prepares
  • 2. Future Chefs Delivers
  • FC Sustains

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Future Chefs prepares teens for successful life and work after high school.


Background Statement

Future Chefs evolved from a scholarship program directed by Founder Toni Elka from 2004 to 2007. Believing strongly that society has a collective obligation to prepare young people to find employment and lead productive lives, Ms. Elka took action when the foundation funding the program ceased operations in 2007. She secured a major grant to develop a comprehensive school-to-career program, utilizing her knowledge and connections, for the pipeline of students already engaged in the former program. Her long-term vision, however, was to enrich and extend workforce development and personal growth opportunities for all teens making the crossing from adolescence to adulthood.

At the onset of the U.S. financial crisis in September of 2008, Future Chefs was developing its second year of programming. Because of the economic downturn, Future Chefs’ initial, sole funder abruptly withdrew support. Again undeterred, Ms. Elka secured new funding and entered into a fiscal sponsorship agreement with Third Sector New England. These early experiences lead Future Chefs to prioritize sustainable funding while continuing to build capacity and develop innovative programming.

Since 2008, Future Chefs has been focused on program development and high impact capacity building and has served more than 600 Greater Boston Youth. In 2011, the Root Cause Social Innovation Forum recognized these efforts and named Future Chefs the “Innovator for Education and Employment for Vulnerable Youth.” This prestigious award provided Future Chefs with both high profile recognition and an array of capacity building tools and resources. With Root Causes’ support, Future Chefs developed a two-year plan to open an office, teaching kitchen and office in Boston. In February of 2012, one year ahead of schedule, Future Chefs moved into this new space. The Boston Teaching Kitchen has significantly enriched and expanded Future Chefs’ programming.

Future Chefs marked several other milestones in 2012. In September, the organization completed a comprehensive one-year engagement with the Boston Capacity Institute to create a performance measurement system. With the help of Capacity Institute consultants, Future Chefs (1) developed a formal Logic Model/Theory of Change and measurement indicators, (2) improved data collection and (3) systemized referral and recruitment partnerships. Through a grant from the Mass Mentoring Partnership, Future Chefs also retained a full time “Highland Street Corps Ambassador of Mentoring” to focus exclusively on new program models and opportunities.

Future Chefs continues to receive recognition, build capacity and improve and enrich its programming. In 2013, The Philanthropic Initiative at the Boston Foundation named Ms. Elka the first Boston Neighborhood Fellow. An April 22 Boston Herald Article on Third Sector New England, “A Mission to Manage,” highlights Future Chefs’ decision to choose fiscal sponsorship.

In 2013, BostInno identified Future Chefs as one of “Fifty on Fire." Following this in 2014, the Boston Business Journal honored Future Chefs and Shawmut Design and Construction as one of four Corporate Citizenship Summit Partners, and in 2016 Future Chefs was named a Game Changer by the Boston Globe.

Impact Statement

Future Chefs offers programming for low-income youth (ages 15-20) from Boston and Greater Boston area that is designed to create a way out of the cycle of poverty, address the "skills gap" and provide young people with viable post-secondary options and a clear career pathway. 
 
There is an urgent need for clear career pathways and relevant post-secondary options for under-resourced, low-income Boston and Greater Boston youth. These youth face a difficult transition to a career because they often lack the family or community networks necessary to (1) conceptualize and implement a viable post-secondary plan; (2) connect with the labor force on a regular basis; (3) establish a positive social support system and (4) overcome racial, socio-economic and personal barriers. Too many (an estimated 50%) are either ill-equipped or unprepared to pursue a four-year college degree and lack other quality alternatives.

The labor market has become more demanding and many employers recognize the existence of a skills gap – young adults lack the training and the 21st century skills necessary to sustain a middle wage job. A report from Harvard University’s School of Education recognizes that although some education beyond high school is “the passport to the American Dream,” the real questions facing these low-income young people are “what kind?” and “how much?” education is necessary to succeed. Current research demonstrates that early employment is a key benchmark in the journey to adulthood and a crucial milestone on a youth’s pathway to a career after high school. Yet, teens and young adults cannot find work. In 2010 the unemployment rate for teens reached an unsettling peak. One in five teens was unemployed –the highest rate ever recorded for that age group since the Bureau of Labor and Statistics started collecting data in 1947. Although the U.S. economy has improved and the unemployment rate for adults has decreased from its 2010 high, teen unemployment remains a troubling problem.

Future Chefs is well positioned to address the need for career pathways among at-risk youth by teaching hard culinary skills and transferable soft skills in a positive youth development environment. Other Boston workforce development organizations with a culinary focus serve disengaged adults. In contrast, Future Chefs serves primarily high school students. We intervene earlier in the lives of these youth and help them to establish a pattern of success. Other Boston nonprofits, such Year Up who serve older teens and young adults and More Than Words, serving off-track youth, provide career pathways or work experience in different industries. Our common purpose is to empower and engage youth who are at risk of being left behind.  Future Chefs uses the low barrier to entry in the food service industry and Future Chefs network of enlightened employers to provide positive youth development experiences on the job. 

Our high touch, extended model provides Boston teens with the sequential youth development experiences needed to confidently pursue quality early employment opportunities along with the support and coaching to maximize the positive outcomes for early work experiences.

Needs Statement

Future Chefs’ goals for the next one to two years reflect significant growth on both an organizational and program level. To support this growth, Future Chefs needs:

1. Funding to help deepen the impact and reach of FC Prepares program by adding additional cohorts in Boston to meet the growing demand.
2. Strengthen the pipeline for potential apprentices by expanding the recruitment efforts for the Apprenticeship Program.
3. Expand the number of students in FC Delivers and increase the opportunities for paid youth work.
4. Develop revenue-producing, social enterprise initiatives.
5. Funding to support our impending move and development of a new space that allows Future Chefs to meet the needs of its expanding programs and increased demand.



CEO Statement

The labor market has become more demanding and many employers recognize the existence of a skills gap – young adults lack the training and the 21st-century skills necessary to sustain a middle wage job. A report from Harvard University’s School of Education recognizes that although some education beyond high school is “the passport to the American Dream,” the real questions facing these low-income young people are “what kind?” and “how much?” education is necessary to succeed.

There is an urgent need for clear career pathways and post-secondary options for Boston and Greater Boston youth who are unprepared, unready or disinterested in a 4 year post-secondary degree. These youth face a difficult transition to a career because they often lack the family or community networks necessary to help build a vision for the critical time after high school when they need a plan and opportunities to build confidence and transferable skills in the workforce.

A recent Massachusetts Labor Force study showed that teen and young adult employment is in steady decline since 1999. While other Boston workforce development organizations with a culinary focus serve older disengaged youth and adults, Future Chefs is addressing this downward trend by intervening earlier in the lives of low income youth and helping them to establish a pattern of success.


Board Chair Statement

Future Chefs relies on an active Advisory Council consisting of community partners and industry professionals that help support and further our mission. In the past year, we met our goal to recruit for strategic planning and leadership which has strengthened our board.
Keeping this group growing to meet the changing needs of our organization as we grow is a challenge. We are working hard to diversify and recruit for alumni to join our board.
 
A governance committee has developed a program of recruitment and on-boarding to identify new members and get them fully contributing as soon as possible. This is a small example but I feel so proud to represent and talk about Future Chefs to interested individuals. I am confident that if they come on board, their experience will be heartfelt and rewarding.
 

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Future Chefs offers programming in the Boston Teaching Kitchen (South End, Lower Roxbury).

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Education - Educational Services
  3. Employment - Employment Preparation & Procurement

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

1. FC Prepares

FC Prepares is an after-school program for high school sophomores to help Boston youth explore the skills needed and careers available in the culinary industry. It is a comprehensive learning opportunity for students interested in food-related work. Future Chefs' staff and culinary experts lead weekly after-school culinary activities for six weeks at our Boston teaching kitchen. These classes include basic kitchen safety and sanitation, chef demos, networking at local culinary events and a team-based capstone project.

 Students in this program are learning culinary skills and life skills and are involved in:

1. Once a week for six weeks after school at the Boston Teaching Kitchen.
2. Learning the hard skills of basic kitchen safety and sanitation, and the soft skills of communication and self-reflection.
3. Professional development opportunities through networking at local culinary events.
4. Industry-related field trips and chef demonstrations in the teaching kitchen and at restaurants.
5. Competing in a skills-based project.
Budget  $259,345.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
Program Short-Term Success 

Participants complete FC Prepares and are eligible to move on to FC Delivers if they (1) attend 90% or more of the after school sessions, (2) participate in major skills event.

Short-Term success of FC Prepares includes:
 
-Participants can properly hold and understand how to use a knife
-Participants communicate clearly and safely using correct language to move around the kitchen and can define multiple kitchen terms, and add new terms to my vocabulary
-Participants practice safe handling of raw meat products while cooking in the kitchen and can keep my station clean and organized
-Participants gather the correct mise en place and execute a recipe by reading through the instructions with the support of an instructor
-Participants execute the following culinary technique: sear ”
-Participants support/help a teammate in need and can recognize when they need and have received help
-Participants communicate clearly and accurately to a team in a group setting and can communicate well with staff, by texting staff back right away and can communicate changes in schedule in a timely manner
-Participants identify problems and solve them in a timely manner and can resolve conflicts within a group setting
-Participants show patience and regulate behaviors and impulses
-Participants recognize and label personal feelings and can assess personal strengths and areas of improvement.


Program Long-Term Success 
Long-Term success of FC Prepares includes:
 
-Participants identify multiple career options in the culinary community

-60% of students remain engaged in the next phase of the program

-30% of students accept jobs offered by Future Chefs.

Program Success Monitored By 

 

Program success is monitored by program completion through student and staff assessment which includes an end of the semester project. In addition, instructors assess via the Expeditionary Learning model and are focusing on the following outcomes:
 Develop connection with staff and peers.
 Use basic sanitation practices.
 Know the names and uses of common commercial tools and equipment.
 Attend after school classes regularly.
 Demonstrate professional appearance required by the culinary industry.
 Attend both program events and professional development opportunities.
 Recognize and label their own feelings using the Attitude/Gratitude exercise.
 Communicate clearly, accurately listen, cooperate and find conflict resolution within a group setting.
 
Examples of Program Success 
Sophomore student Tiffany joined our program in the fall for 6 week FC Prepares program and then applied for a job through BCYF to work 10 hrs/week for 4 months. The application paperwork required several steps and visits to another office so there was communication between the student and the program staff by phone and email. When the staff couldn’t get in touch with her directly, they emailed her mom. Her mom helped get the student's paperwork together and Program staff picked her up from school to the office and once she completed her paperwork, dropped her at home. Tiffany went on to become an assistant at Future Chefs to help with FC Prepares cycle 2, as part of her regular schedule of work. She prepares the kitchen space ahead of the other students arriving, talks to them while they are working and provides guidance on following recipes or knife cuts. She also closes out the day with them. She shows up with a consistently good attitude and is very comfortable and welcoming to new people, both students and adults.
 
Junior student Makayla in FC Prepares program joined our program in the fall for 6 week program and then applied for a job through BCYF to work 10 hrs/week for 4 months. This student is also taking an SAT prep class during the week and balances school, her job here and getting ready for the next step in her education. Her uncle has been her guardian since her mother’s passing a few years ago and she takes on a lot of responsibility to care for herself. She has great communication skills and eagerly works with new students and brings a positive attitude to the room.

2. Future Chefs Delivers

FC Delivers is a two-year long program for students who complete FC Prepares and the 10th grade. In 11th grade they enroll to receive further training, education, and work. Individual skills competitions, ongoing opportunities to work alongside professional chefs and participation in after-school and out-of-school activities emphasize social/emotional learning. Parents and guardians meet program staff to discuss their child’s goal for life after high school. The goal at the completion of the 11th grade is for every student to be employed during the summer and maintain paid work during their senior year.

Every 12th Grade participant completes the second portion of the FC Delivers program. This is an individualized recipe for post-secondary success. Future Chefs staff in consultation with the students' parent or guardian facilitate this planning process. Each student also creates a dish for a senior project that is presented to family, teachers and culinary industry professionals at a Small Plates Pop Up dinner.

Budget  $283,665.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

Future Chefs will maintain the growth of Future Chefs Delivers while also achieving the following short-term success  measured by:

-Participants can explore 3 career options in the culinary community that I am interested in pursuing after high school

-Participants identify and execute a small/medium/large dice, julienne

-Participants confidently use a 3 basin sink system to clean dishes

-Participants articulate safe sanitation practice when serving food

-Participants can hone a knife and explain the importance of keeping knives sharp

-Participants can scale a recipe down or up

-Participants can make a stable sauce, sear & rest meat, pan sear/ grill and blanch and shock

-Participants recognize diverse and available supports and opportunities

-Participants create SMART goals that are attainable and work towards accomplishing them

-Participants create and update a resume with skills developed from learning targets

-Participant understands how to open a checking/savings account and develop a savings plan


Program Long-Term Success 

Long-Term Success includes; 100% of participants complete their senior year of high school, 100% of participants create a clear plan for after high school supported by Future Chefs post-secondary tracks, 90% of participants complete a senior project and 60% of participants accept jobs offered by Future Chefs.  
Program Success Monitored By 

Future Chefs monitors success is measured by staff assessment via Expeditionary Learning model. Student success includes program completion and an end of the program project. Future Chefs identifies long-term success by the following outcomes: 

 Attend after school classes regularly.
 Demonstrate professional appearance required by the culinary industry.
 Communicate clearly, accurately listen, cooperate and find conflict resolution within a group setting.
 Attend soft skills workshops.
 Attend one or more Future Chefs events.
 Deepen culinary knowledge and skills.
 Complete Junior skill drill 1B in the spring.
 Successfully complete their junior year of high school and commit to pursuing a post-secondary track in the culinary industry.
 Obtain part-time employment or the equivalent.
 
Seniors - all of the above, plus:
 Complete Senior skill drill 1A in the fall.
 Obtain part-time employment or the equivalent.
 Create a post-secondary plan.
 Complete FAFSA.
 Complete application to schools, jobs or apprenticeship. (including letters of reference)
 Graduate high school
Examples of Program Success 

Student Chrissy came to Future Chefs in her junior year at Quincy high school. She spoke at our student graduation event last year and in her own words, “It was difficult at first; I always wondered who was looking at me, if I was doing okay, or if my knife cuts were as good as anyone else’s. Through the teaching of [staff], I have learned to focus my energy on myself.” While Chrissy initially considered going to JWU, she reviewed her financials and discussed with FC staff and culinary instructors at Quincy High School and plans to go to Bunker Hill to save money and complete her requirements before moving on to a 4-year institution.

Student Jon came to Future Chefs as a friend of a current student when he was in his sophomore year in high school. He was consistent through those first two years in the program and then was open with staff that he was pursuing art – both as a summer job and for his post-secondary option. He got a job in a bakery doing prep earlier in the year and reported gratitude for Future Chefs helping him obtain that employment which was making him feel more confident and excited in his abilities and professionalism. Jon also received a recommendation from ED, Toni, for MassArt since she was a graduate and could see his drive and passion. He was excited to share his art with her and all the staff.

Quality Employment/Culinary Certificate: Student Josh joined Future Chefs two years ago, as a home-schooled youth. It was a meaningful opportunity for him to spend time learning alongside his peers and also be able to learn leadership skills based on the knowledge he already had. He was a summer employee (20 hrs/week for 7 weeks) with Future Chefs along with 5 other students and it provided an opportunity for the intensity required for his personal and professional growth. Since the summer, he has been given more opportunity to be the lead assistant for adult and youth cooking classes at Future Chefs which he has reported that he “really likes.”


FC Sustains

This program supports students for the two years after they graduate high school and complete the FC Delivers program. Students receive guidance and support from Future Chefs staff as they begin implementing their plan after high school in our Apprenticeship program, at an accredited college, university, certificate program, or other high-quality culinary position. Participants who complete the program can expect to work full time, earn above the minimum wage, have opportunities for career advancement, and be eligible for benefits through their employer.

FC Sustains participants serve as peer leaders and volunteers at community and program events. Students exit FC Sustains after two years of support and are Future Chefs Alumni, often becoming the high-quality employers for the next generation of students.

The formal apprenticeship is designed to provide low to moderate income participants with a post-secondary alternative to an expensive and time-consuming culinary degree. The apprenticeship program provides participants with a cost-effective pathway to a viable career in a thriving industry. These young professionals work in six-month paid apprenticeships at renowned Boston restaurants. They meet regularly with Future Chefs staff and are mentored at their respective restaurants by on-site supervisors who oversee their progress. Additionally, apprentices can stay connected to Future Chefs through monthly life-skills workshops and by serving as peer leaders and volunteers at community programs and events.

Budget  $150,865.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Business
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations Other Economic Level
Program Short-Term Success 

Short-Term Success is measured by 100% of participants implement a post-secondary plan supported by Future Chefs post-secondary track, 90% of participants maintain connection and receive coaching via bi-weekly check-ins with the program staff and 90% of participants report increased competence in Future Chefs Social/Emotional Development skills. Indicators of short-term success include:

-Participants choose a post-secondary track

-Participants complete the post-secondary planning process

-Participants meet post-secondary plan milestones

-Participants graduate from high school and begin to execute career plan through post-secondary education, apprenticeship or full-time employment.

-Participants meet contact requirements with post-secondary advisor for chosen track

-Participants attend one Future Chefs’ event per year

-Participants complete or are on track to complete post-secondary plan

Program Long-Term Success 

Future Chefs has identified long-term success when participants continue to execute their post-secondary plan as indicated by the following outcomes:

1. 100% of FC Apprenticeship participants receive a full-time job offer from Apprenticeship site

2. 90% of FC 2 year/4 year Education participants remain on track to graduate

3. 90% of FC Culinary Certificate participants graduate and receive certificate

4. 90% of FC Quality Employment participants maintain full-time employment that meets Future Chefs Quality Employment criteria

Program Success Monitored By 

In FC Sustains, success is monitored by evaluation of the following outcomes:

High School Graduates:

· Choose a post-secondary track.

· Execute their career plan through post-secondary education, apprenticeship or full-time employment.

· Meet post-secondary plan milestones.

· Meet contact requirements with post-secondary advisor for chosen track.

· Attend one Future Chefs event per year.

· Complete or are on track to complete their post-secondary plan.

Apprenticeship

Participants:

· Achieve sustainable, steady employment.

· Acquire skills that make them employable above an entry-level position.

· Receive an offer for full-time employment at restaurants where they apprentice.

Examples of Program Success 

Apprenticeship: David was part of the Pilot Program of a program where students trained for culinary skills and were paid by another program to be here. He is a quiet, reflective and thoughtful young man who seemed to struggle with being on time and time management of his sleep schedule. Although he showed a strong interest in participating in the apprenticeship – a 6 month, 40 hr a week, paid opportunity to work for one of our restaurant partners who he met while at Future Chefs. The restaurant grinds their wheat for their homemade pasta, a level of care in the process not lost on this student. He has continued to work the cold prep station there and sees himself getting better week after week. He’s come back to volunteer with younger students and talk about his experience and has found his voice and vocation.

Culinary Certificate: Rahjon came in after-school school programming because of complications in his school and personal life but he was consistently communicative about what was happening. When he wanted to rejoin, he initiated the effort and became one of our summer MLK employees. He was a natural front of the house employee, with a big smile and charmed almost all of the 100 students and staff we served four days a week for 6 weeks. He is never afraid to work hard and ask questions to improve his skills so when the opportunity to apply for a culinary certificate program scholarship came up, he was an easy choice. He came in day after day to complete his resume, application, and interview. Caring staff supported him while in school to advocate for his learning needs and persevere. He graduated this spring amidst other personal turmoil in his life and staff is still coming up with ways for him to continue to positively influence the FC community.

Quality Employment: Sisi has been a highly motivated, standout student since she started at FC. She was very young for her grade and was on track to complete her hiSet/GED by 16 years old, which she did. This happened before she began her apprenticeship at at a busy, high end French restaurant for 6 months. Now that she has those experiences under her belt, she is taking classes at Bunker Hill, working part time for Future Chefs helping to lead recruitment events & weekly FCP classes, and work for another nonprofit organization as a youth leader. Staff now looks to her to be a spokesperson for the mission and to train newer students on how to get comfortable speaking publicly about their experience.

Megan/Taylor - 2 year/4 year Ed: Megan stepped into Future Chefs late in her high school time, at the end of her junior year to help graduating students at their capstone event as a dishwasher. Her high energy and immediate jump into action was incredibly helpful and began the mutual investment between FC and Megan. She finished out her senior year strong and as a participant in the capstone event that year. She worked as an apprentice for Saloniki, a newly opened fast casual restaurant, and has returned there during school vacations because of the strong relationship she built with the staff and owners. Megan was also supported by staff – Cheryl- in the school transfer process when she decided to move out of state to attend SNHU to complete a four year degree. Cheryl helped Megan with understanding her financial aid, determining

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As we enter our second decade of growth, Future Chefs has moved founder-led and directed organization to an organization with expanding leadership. We have weathered a series of threats (recession, moves) to deepen our practice and build a reputation for grassroots work supported by best practices. Expanded leadership has helped build and strengthen staff competency. Growth has also meant the need to increase operations capacity to sustain growth. That means investing in data collection and analysis and refining our budgeting process and ensuring succession for all key positions.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Toni Elka
CEO Term Start Oct 2007
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Ms. Elka understands that life after high school is a risky time for students without a plan, adult support and coaching. She was a cook, caterer and youth development leader for many years, and her passion for the culinary arts fueled her sense of excitement about directing a career program that addresses the needs of youth who might find fulfillment in this creative, hands-on field. In 2007, she sought and singularly found the funding and support to launch Future Chefs.
 
Ms. Elka holds a B.F.A. with honors from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and a Certificate from the Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership at Boston University. She received national recognition for her innovative leadership (Mass. Statewide Peer Leadership Institute) and founded the Circle of Girls program prior to Future Chefs. In 2013 she received a Boston Neighborhood Fellows Award from the Philanthropic Institute and serves on the boards of Boston Day and Evening Academy and The Boston Private Industry Council. In May of 2015, Ms. Elka received an Honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Newbury College.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience


Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Mass Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Governance/Funding Collaborations.  Future Chefs has a vast network of 71 education, community and industry partners. Secondary education and community partners provide a pipeline of participants; post-secondary education partners provide pathways and scholarships; industry partners provide employment opportunities, program development consultation and financial support; and capacity building partners provide organizational support.  Future Chefs is fiscally sponsored by Third Sector New England and collaborates with many funders including the Amelia Peabody Foundation, Angell Foundation, BNY Mellon, Cabot Family Charitable Trust, Devonshire, Liberty Mutual Foundation, Jane B. Cook 1992 Charitable Trust, Cummings Foundation, Schrafft Charitable Trust, Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family Foundation, State Street Foundation, Trefler Foundation, Millennium Partners, Citizens Bank Foundation, and the Van Otterloo Family Foundation. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In FY 16 the leadership team decided to build management level capacity in youth development, outcomes measurement and communications.

On the program side, we hired two key positions, Program Director and Youth Development Manager, to build and strengthen our programs and implement best youth development practices. Additionally, we participated in The Impact Initiative (www.theimpactinitiative.net) to revise our logic model and expand our use of Salesforce to develop best outcomes measurement practices.
 
A Communications and Brand Manager was also hired to support and promote Future Chefs' work in the community. Working closely with the Marketing Committee, Future Chefs has identified the need to strengthen its brand and we completed a new brand identity in 2017. In 2018, we will continue to strengthen communications to supporters and potential supporters through strategic social media, e-news and media relations.
 
 

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 6
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 40
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--
--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Patricia M. Keegan Ed.D.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Pat Keegan Consulting
Board Chair Term Oct 2017 - Sept 2019
Board Co-Chair Susan Lange
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Commonwealth Corporation
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2017 - Jan 2020

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Chris Douglass Tavolo, Ashmont Grill Voting
Gabriel Dym J.D. Eckert, Seamans, Cherin and Mellott, LLP Voting
Andy Freedman Merkatus Partners Voting
Erin Griffith Middlehouse Events Voting
Naome Jeanty Commonwealth Corporation Voting
Patricia M. Keegan Ed.D. ClearRock Consulting Voting
Travis Keltner State Street Corporation --
Aquila Kentish Alum, Jamaica Mi Hungry Voting
Susan Lange Commonwealth Corporation --
Thomas Muldoon CPA Alexander, Aronson & Finning Voting
Robert Ocko Former Banker and Restaurant Owner --
Ellie O'Keefe Nestle Waters North America Voting
Eric Papachristos Trade, Co-Owner, Director of Finance --
Julia Shanks Julia Shanks Food Consulting Voting
Kay Snowden Third Sector New England Voting
Cheryl Straughter Owner, Soleil Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 12
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 7
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Governance and Nominating
  • Marketing

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Governance has expanded and differentiated into solid committees, We began with a restaurant industry base on the council, added different competencies, built committees, assessed if and when we would consider becoming an independent 501c3 and are currently working on goals to add more racial diversity and bring on successful alums to our governance. In addition, we are identifying organizational needs, such as IT and evaluation competency, and will seek those talents for our board.


Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2018 to Sept 30, 2019
Projected Income $836,698.00
Projected Expense $836,600.00
Form 990s

2015 TSNE 990

2014 TSNE 990

2013 TSNE 990

Audit Documents

2015 TSNE Audit

2014 TSNE Audit

2013 TSNE Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $876,841 $712,571 $466,283
Total Expenses $670,892 $493,808 $519,702

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$737,984 $544,350 $276,000
Government Contributions $48,101 $72,680 $28,388
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $48,101 $72,680 $28,388
Individual Contributions $88,244 $81,019 $73,146
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- $10,942 $20,050
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $2,512 $3,580 $68,699

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $548,187 $420,778 $465,283
Administration Expense $71,881 $52,845 $49,689
Fundraising Expense $50,824 $20,185 $4,730
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.31 1.44 0.90
Program Expense/Total Expenses 82% 85% 90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 6% 3% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $571,685 $365,587 $161,265
Current Assets $571,685 $365,587 $161,265
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $40,194 $40,045 $54,486
Total Net Assets $531,491 $325,542 $106,779

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 14.22 9.13 2.96

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Our Advisory Council Finance Committee meets monthly, led by AAF/CPA partner, Thomas Muldoon CPA, retired banker Rob Ocko, and restaurant owner, Erik Papachristos (Trade, Porto, Saloniki). The focus is on ensuring that our financial needs are addressed in a timely and reasonable fashion. We work to provide oversight of the budget process and identify potential risks and opportunities that are in the best interests of Future Chefs. The committee provides added capacity on the operations front and the Chair of the Development Committee, Travis Keltner is a liaison to the Finance Committee.

Foundation Comments

Futures Chefs is fiscally sponsored by Third Sector New England Inc. (TSNE). As such, the audits and 990s posted above are that of TSNE. The data in the charts and graphs reflects Future Chefs only and is per the supplementary pages of the TSNE audits, with additional data provided by the organization.

Documents


Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Future Chefs offers programming for low-income youth (ages 15 to 20) from Boston and Greater Boston designed to create a way out of the cycle of poverty, address the "skills gap" and provide young people with viable post-secondary options and a clear career pathway.

The school-to-career engagement relies on a systemic collaboration with food service employers, social service agencies, and educators to provide standards-based education, preparatory and work-based experiences, youth development, leadership opportunities and referral services. Future Chefs strives to prepare youth for quality early employment and post-secondary education opportunities in the culinary field and supports them in developing a broad base of transferable skills as they transition into the working world. 
 
There is an urgent need for clear career pathways and relevant post-secondary options for low-income Boston and Greater Boston youth. These youth face a difficult transition to a career because they lack the family or community networks necessary to (1) conceptualize and implement a viable post-secondary plan; (2) connect with the labor force on a regular basis; (3) establish a positive social support system and (4) overcome racial, socio-economic and personal barriers. Also, many (an estimated 50%) are either ill-equipped or unprepared to pursue a four-year college degree.
 
The labor market has become more demanding and many employers recognize the existence of a skills gap - young adults lack the training and the 21st century skills necessary to sustain a middle wage job. Many of these young adults are faced with figuring out what kind and how much education is necessary for them to succeed.

Future Chefs is well positioned to address the need for career pathways among youth by teaching culinary and life skills in a positive youth development environment. In the next three years, Future Chefs will continue to deepen its practice and refine services so that young people in Greater Boston have an opportunity to engage in meaningful work and become financially stable members of their community.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Program staff members have focused on outreach activities over the past year, making great strides in developing new, and deepening existing relationships.  A special effort has been made by program staff to develop relationships with guidance counselors at different schools to identify youth who may have interest in the culinary field. Staff members have also attended training, career fairs, and youth development workshops through Health Resources in Action, Youth Worker training and other capacity-building workshops offered by funding partners. 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Future Chefs is well positioned to address the need for career pathways among youth by teaching hard culinary skills and transferable soft skills in a positive youth development environment. Other Boston workforce development organizations with a culinary focus serve disengaged youth and adults. In contrast, Future Chefs intervenes earlier in the lives of youth and helps them to establish a pattern of success. 

Future Chefs has been focused on staff capacity and is well equipped to reach its goals. The Future Chefs leadership team is in place and meets regularly and a 14 member Advisory Council meets quarterly. Future Chefs has also added several committees to support its work, including a Financial Committee, Move Committee, Fundraising Committee and Marketing Committee.

Future Chefs has a strong network of collaborators including high school education partners and secondary education partners, community partners, a large number of engaged industry partners, program development and financial support, and several collaborative support and capacity building partners that contribute toward organizational and program development.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Future Chefs has completed a refined outcome measurement protocol and uses Salesforce to track those outcomes. 

Progress is measured by Future Chefs' reach (number of participants at different levels of programming), the number of participants who reach key benchmarks in the pathway to long-term employment such as a high school diploma, a marketable industry credential, some post-secondary education, solid job-readiness skills and short-term, transition employment. 


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

In response to industry and student need, Future Chefs launched a formal Apprenticeship program in 2015. An Industry Advisory Council, in conjunction with Future Chefs, developed a list of ten goals that each apprentice must meet to complete the program, and progress toward these goals is measured on a weekly basis. Future Chefs provides the soft skills/educational component in-house through workshops that are tailored to the needs of the apprentices, using portions of "Signaling Success," a soft skills curriculum developed by Commonwealth Corp to connect teens and young adults to career pathways.

Apprentices spend approximately 40 hours per week in the kitchen of a high-end restaurant and attend two-hour soft skills workshops two times a month. Each apprentice is paid a stipend and is mentored by an on-site supervisor who oversees his or her progress.

Since the onset of the Apprenticeship program, we realized that the hourly wage being paid in the Apprenticeship had to be increased. Several youth opted for dead-end job instead. We increased the stipend and increased the weekly hours from 32 to 40 to make the program an economically viable option.

We continue to expand our training programs to ensure that staff members are given the tools and support they need to succeed. Still, as our UTEC colleague, Greg Croteau said in a recent article about youth who are struggling to find and retain work," It 's not a six- or nine-month journey.  Our young people are going to take a couple of years to work through their bump."  Future Chefs staff and leadership are deeply committed to the quest for sustainable strategies to address this need.