Share |

Future Chefs (fiscally sponsored by Third Sector New England, Inc.)

 Future Chefs, 560 Albany Street
 Boston, MA 02118
[P] (617) 4513883
[F] (617) 4513338
www.futurechefs.net
[email protected]
Toni Elka
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1960
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2261109

LAST UPDATED: 03/14/2017
Organization DBA Future Chefs
FC
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Future Chefs prepares youth for quality early employment and post-secondary opportunities in the culinary field and supports them in developing a broad base of transferable skills as they transition to the working world.

Mission Statement

Future Chefs prepares youth for quality early employment and post-secondary opportunities in the culinary field and supports them in developing a broad base of transferable skills as they transition to the working world.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2016 to Sept 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,161,460.00
Projected Expense $1,251,001.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. Culinary Pathways
  • 2. Future Chefs Delivers
  • 3. Apprenticeship Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Future Chefs prepares youth for quality early employment and post-secondary opportunities in the culinary field and supports them in developing a broad base of transferable skills as they transition to the working world.

Background Statement

Future Chefs evolved from a scholarship program directed by Founder Toni Elka from 2004 to 2007. Believing strongly that we as a society have a collective obligation to prepare young people to find employment and lead productive lives, Ms. Elka took action when the foundation funding the program ceased operations in 2007. She secured a major grant to develop a comprehensive school-to-career program, utilizing her knowledge and connections, for the pipeline of students already engaged in the former program. Her long-term vision, however, was to enrich and extend workforce development and personal growth opportunities for all teens making the crossing from adolescence to adulthood.

At the onset of the U.S. financial crisis in September of 2008, Future Chefs was developing its second year of programming. Because of the economic downturn, Future Chefs’ initial, sole funder abruptly withdrew support. Again undeterred, Ms. Elka secured new funding and entered into a fiscal sponsorship agreement with Third Sector New England. These early experiences lead Future Chefs to prioritize sustainable funding while continuing to build capacity and develop innovative programming.

Since 2008, Future Chefs has been focused on program development and high impact capacity building and has served more than 400 Greater Boston Youth. In 2011, the Root Cause Social Innovation Forum recognized these efforts and named Future Chefs the “Innovator for Education and Employment for Vulnerable Youth.” This prestigious award provided Future Chefs with both high profile recognition and an array of capacity building tools and resources. With Root Causes’ support, Future Chefs developed a two-year plan to open an office, teaching kitchen and office in Boston. In February of 2012, one year ahead of schedule, Future Chefs moved into this new space. The Boston Teaching Kitchen has significantly enriched and expanded Future Chefs’ programming.

Future Chefs marked several other milestones in 2012. In September, the organization completed a comprehensive one-year engagement with the Boston Capacity Institute to create a performance measurement system. With the help of Capacity Institute consultants, Future Chefs (1) developed a formal Logic Model/Theory of Change and measurement indicators, (2) improved data collection and (3) systemized referral and recruitment partnerships. Through a grant from the Mass Mentoring Partnership, Future Chefs also retained a full time “Highland Street Corps Ambassador of Mentoring” to focus exclusively on new program models and opportunities.

Future Chefs continues to receive recognition, build capacity and improve and enrich its programming. In 2013, The Philanthropic Initiative at the Boston Foundation named Ms. Elka the first Boston Neighborhood Fellow. An April 22 Boston Herald Article on Third Sector New England, “A Mission to Manage,” highlights Future Chefs’ decision to choose fiscal sponsorship.

In 2013, BostInno identified Future Chefs as one of “Fifty on Fire." Following this in 2014, the Boston Business Journal honored Future Chefs and Shawmut Design and Construction as one of four Corporate Citizenship Summit Partners, and in 2016 Future Chefs was named a Game Changer by the Boston Globe.

Impact Statement

Future Chefs offers programming for low-income youth (ages 16-24) from Boston and Greater Boston area that is designed to create a way out of the cycle of poverty, address the "skills gap" and provide young people with viable post-secondary options and a clear career pathway. 
 
Organizational Highlights and Accomplishments 2015-2016:
  • Apprenticeship Program: Future Chefs completed two sessions of the apprenticeship program which began in April 2015.  Apprentices spend approximately 32-40 hours per week in a paid position in high-end Boston restaurants. They attend a two-hour professional development workshop two times each month and work closely with supervisors who monitor their progress.
  • Future Chefs launched a pilot of Future Chefs Delivers in the fall of 2015. The program is designed to meet the needs of proven-risk youth aged 18-24, who are neither in school nor working, by providing a 25 hour per week paid position of culinary training and workforce readiness skills. Food is prepared and delivered without cost to local non-profits who provide services for children, youth, families and the homeless. After completing training, students have access to FC’s post-secondary opportunities, including employment in the culinary industry.
  • Performance Measurement: In April 2015, Future Chefs began work on performance measurement. Over the past 12 months, Future Chefs refined the logic model for its programming, identified indicators and measurement tools and implemented a performance measurement protocol. Future Chefs also built out a Salesforce database to measure and track program outcomes. 

Current Goals 2016-2017:

  • New Headquarters: Future Chefs will be moving to a new space in 2017 as a result of redevelopment of its current location. Relocation will serve as an opportunity to expand its teaching kitchen/office space and its programming. Future Chefs plans to remain in its current neighborhood of Boston's South End/Lower Roxbury.
  • Explore the development of a revenue producing, social enterprise initiative.
  • Contribute to and support the development of a best practices model for addressing youth unemployment through creative, career-specific strategies in partnership with employers, educators and other community-based organizations. 

Needs Statement

Future Chefs’ goals for the next one to two years reflect significant growth on both an organizational and program level. To support this growth, Future Chefs needs:

1. Funding to help deepen the impact and reach of Culinary Pathways program by adding a second cohort in Boston to meet the growing demand.
2. Strengthen the pipeline for potential apprentices by expanding the recruitment efforts for the Apprenticeship Program.
3. Expand the number of students in Future Chefs Delivers and increase the support to community agencies that serve food insecure clients.
4. Develop a revenue producing, social enterprise initiative.
5. Funding to support our impending move and development of a new space that allows Future Chefs to meet the needs of its expanding programs and increased demand.



CEO Statement

The labor market has become more demanding and many employers recognize the existence of a skills gap – young adults lack the training and the 21st century skills necessary to sustain a middle wage job. A report from Harvard University’s School of Education recognizes that although some education beyond high school is “the passport to the American Dream,” the real questions facing these low-income young people are “what kind?” and “how much?” education is necessary to succeed.

There is an urgent need for clear career pathways and post-secondary options for Boston and Greater Boston youth who are unprepared, unready or disinterested in a 4 year post secondary degree. These youth face a difficult transition to a career because they often lack the family or community networks necessary to help build a vision for the critical time after high school when they need a plan and opportunities to build confidence and transferrable skills in the workforce.

A recent Massachusetts Labor Force study showed that teen and young adult employment is in steady decline since 1999. While other Boston workforce development organizations with a culinary focus serve disengaged youth and adults, Future Chefs is addressing this downward trend by intervening earlier in the lives of youth and helping them to establish a pattern of success.


Board Chair Statement

Future Chefs relies on an active Advisory Council consisting of community partners and industry professionals that help support and further our mission. In the past year, we met our goal to recruit for strategic planning and leadership which has strengthened our board.
Keeping this group growing to meet the changing needs of our organization as we grow is a challenge. We are also working hard to diversify and recruit for alumni to join our board.
 
A governance committee has developed a program of recruitment and on-boarding to identify new members and get them fully contributing as soon as possible. This is a small example but I feel so proud to represent and talk about Future Chefs to interested individuals. I am confident that if they come on board, their experience will be heartfelt and rewarding.
 

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Future Chefs offers programming in the Boston Teaching Kitchen (South End, Lower Roxbury) and three satellite locations: Everett, Somerville and Quincy. 

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Education - Educational Services
  3. Employment - Employment Preparation & Procurement

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

1. Culinary Pathways

Students enter Phase l of Culinary Pathways as high school sophomores or juniors. Education and community partners help FC identify and recruit students who are interested in the culinary arts but need the support necessary to create a pathway to a career goal. Students in this phase are learning culinary skills and life skills and are involved in:

1. Weekly after school classes in the Boston Teaching Kitchen and/or at Everett, Somerville and Quincy High Schools.
2. Challenging skills events.
3. Professional development opportunities – community engagement, industry events, and chef demonstrations. 
4. Planning workshops and meetings with FC Post-Secondary Planning and Placement Specialist.
 
Participants enroll in Phase ll of Culinary Pathways after completing Phase 1 and are rising high school seniors. Phase ll involves the following activities:
 
1. Regular meetings with FC Post-Secondary Planning and Placement Specialist to develop an individual plan.
2. Continual support in finding and maintaining part-time culinary employment.
3. Workshops at the FC Teaching Kitchen focusing on culinary and job readiness skills, financial literacy and health and wellbeing.
4. Training in critical thinking, problem solving and creativity. 
Budget  $259,345.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
Program Short-Term Success 

Participants complete Phase l and are eligible to move on to Phase 2 if they (1) attend 75% or more of the after school sessions, (2) participate in both major program events, and (3) attend 75% or more of professional development opportunities.

Participants complete Phase II and graduate from Culinary Pathways when they (1) commit to a written post-secondary plan in a designated track (education, apprenticeship, employment); (2) meet specific benchmarks in their post-secondary plan; (3) graduate from high school; (4) attend at least 80% of Future Chefs’ scheduled programming and meetings with post-secondary advisor (excused absence does not impact attendance); and (5) complete 16 weeks of part-time food-related employment unless doing so would have an adverse effect on family finances.    
Program Long-Term Success 

Participants emerge from Culinary Pathways with the hard skills necessary to succeed in the culinary industry and the soft skills necessary to succeed in any industry. While most participants pursue culinary careers, some choose a different pathway and apply what they learned to a new profession.  To become graduates of the program, youth must complete high school and commit to a written post-secondary plan in a designated track (education, apprenticeship, employment).

Program Success Monitored By 

Future Chefs is focusing on the following outcomes:

(1) Culinary Exploration Participants:  
Develop interpersonal connection with staff and peers; Use basic sanitation practices; Know the names and uses of common commercial tools and equipment; Attend after school classes regularly; Demonstrate professional appearance required by the culinary industry; Attend both program events and professional development opportunities; Use basic kitchen equipment appropriately; Successfully complete their junior year of high school and are committed to pursuing a post-secondary track in the culinary industry.

(2) Culinary Pathways Planning: 
Participants attend soft skills workshops; Attend one or more Future Chefs events; Obtain part-time employment or the equivalent.
Additionally, Future Chefs has built capacity around performance measurement and implemented a database (Salesforce) to collect and report this data.
 
Examples of Program Success 

Culinary Pathways is successful in providing 168 hours per year of after​school programming, and the Somerville, Quincy, and Everett cohorts received 70 hours per year of after​school programming. In addition, Future Chefs offered 10 field trips, 2 service activities, 5 professional development workshops, 4 industry networking events and 5 chef demonstrations to Phase I participants totaling approximately 70 activity hours.

Success is also measured by improvement in culinary skills and soft skills - 100 % of the participants that completed Phase I improved these skills. In addition, Participants added 5 – 10 culinary professionals to their network. 14 of the participants continued on to Phase II.

In Phase II , 12 12th graders received an average of 15 hours of one-on-​one career counseling to develop a clear post- secondary plan. 90% of the participants that completed Phase II developed a clear post-​secondary plan. 100 % of the participants that completed Phase II expanded and maintained their professional network.


2. Future Chefs Delivers

Future Chefs Delivers is designed to: (1) meet the needs of proven-risk youth aged 18-24 who are neither in school nor working by providing culinary training and, upon completion, access to FC post-secondary opportunities including employment in the culinary industry, and (2) provide support to community partners who serve food-insecure clients.  

In partnership with community organizations, youths who expressed an interest in the culinary arts are being provided 20 to 25 hours per week of paid, purposeful work. Food is prepared and delivered without cost to local non-profits who provide services for children and youth, families and the homeless.

Participants are taught culinary skills in the Boston teaching kitchen and are responsible for planning, preparing and delivering the food to community partners. After completing a session of FC Delivers, participants have access to Future Chefs’ post-secondary planning resources and its substantial network of industry partners for support as they weigh their options for the future. 
Budget  $283,665.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

Future Chefs will maintain the growth of Future Chefs Delivers while also achieving the following short-term success as measured by:

1) Participants choose a post-secondary track.
2) Participants complete the post-secondary planning process and meet post-secondary plan milestones.
3) Students begin to execute their career plan through post-secondary education.
4) Participants are engaged in the apprenticeship program or full-time employment.
Program Long-Term Success 

Future Chefs continues to deepen this program and identifies long-term success by the following outcomes:

1) More stipends are available to increase the number of participating students.  More money is available to provide food to community agencies that serve families, children and the homeless.
2) Program becomes more adaptable to participant and industry needs. 
3) Restaurant placements are started earlier.
4) Recruitment is expanded to more community partnerships. More at-risk youth are served and their needs more fully met.
Program Success Monitored By 

Future Chefs has increased our capacity for program evaluation through the development and implementation of Salesforce on the program side. Future Chefs is in the process of creating a Logic Model for Future Chefs Delivers and a detailed plan to measure the outcomes going forward. Future Chefs evaluates individual student outcomes for the Future Chefs Delivers program through an adapted version of the Massachusetts Work Based Learning Plan measuring work ethic and professionalism by tracking attendance and punctuality, workplace appearance, acceptance of direction and constructive criticism, motivation and understanding of workplace culture, policy and safety, and regularly shared these results with our partner youth services partners. The evaluation form also measures communication and interpersonal skills. These were also reviewed with the individual student.

Examples of Program Success  After completing the first session of Future Chefs Delivers, FC made changes to the in order to recruit youth who are a better fit for the program. We also adjusted our curriculum by customizing our hard and soft skills course work to meet the specific needs of parenting, homeless, and older unemployed youth and are more successful in helping these students remain on a positive career track. We are continuing to work with FC Delivers students as they develop their career plan, and have hired a designated youth development manager to ensure that all program design, implementation and evaluation is culturally responsive and grounded in good youth development theory and practices.

3. Apprenticeship Program

The formal apprenticeship is designed to provide low to moderate income participants with a post-secondary alternative to an expensive and time-consuming culinary degree. The apprenticeship program provides participants with a cost effective pathway to a viable career in a thriving industry.

The program also provides the Boston restaurant industry with a pipeline of qualified workers. High-end Boston chefs and restaurateurs face challenges in filling key front-and back-of-the-house positions, and the demand for qualified, career-focused employees simply exceeds the supply. Many Future Chefs’ graduates are thriving in high-end kitchens, and employers frequently reach out to Future Chefs seeking new talent. 
 
Apprentices spend approximately 40 hours per week in the kitchen and attend one two-hour soft skills workshop two times a month. Each apprentice is paid a stipend and is mentored by an on-site supervisor who oversees his or her progress and a progress meeting with a Future Chefs' staff member.
Budget  $150,865.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Business
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations Other Economic Level
Program Short-Term Success  The Industry Advisory Council, in conjunction with Future Chefs, developed a list of ten goals that each apprentice must meet to complete the program. The weekly evaluation includes both the hard and soft skills necessary to be deemed employable. Progress toward these goals is measured on a weekly basis. Future Chefs provides the soft skills/educational component in-house through workshops that are tailored to the needs of the apprentices, using portions of "Signaling Success," a soft skills curriculum developed by Commonwealth Corp to connect teens and young adults to career pathways. 
Program Long-Term Success 

Future Chefs is expanding its Apprenticeship program and has identified long-term success by the following outcomes:

1)  More apprentices join the program and help to meet the employment needs of high-end restaurants.
2)  More apprentices secure path to employment in culinary field without incurring costs of expensive culinary school. Debt free vocational education is provided.
3)  Future Chefs Delivers becomes viable first step toward formal culinary vocational education. 
4) More apprentices secure full time employment and are on track to develop and improve professional skills. 
 
Program Success Monitored By 

Future Chefs tracks many components of the program to measure success:

1) Attendance at workshops, which is recorded by staff.
2) Apprentice achieves a level of competency on Foundational Skills and Workplace and Career Skills which are assessed weekly and monthly by staff and supervisors.
3) Apprentice has assumed a position that involves more responsibility, skills and autonomy. Future Chefs staff meets with site supervisor and receives feedback about Apprentices' progress.
 
These milestones are also recorded and tracked in the Future Chefs salesforce database. 
Examples of Program Success 

Future Chefs has successfully launched the Apprenticeship program and piloted the program  in high-end restaurants. Apprentices are attending two-hour soft skills workshops two times a month. Apprentices also attend two weekly meetings – an on-site meeting with his or her supervisor and a progress meeting with a Future Chefs' staff member based on the Mass Work-Based Learning Plan. Future Chefs provides the soft skills/educational component in-house through workshops that are tailored to the needs of the apprentices, using portions of "Signaling Success," a soft skills curriculum developed by Commonwealth Corp to connect teens and young adults to career pathways.

Partnerships with Boston restaurants remain strong, and Apprenticeship sites include: Trade, SRV, Taberna de Haro, T.W. Food, Island Creek Oyster Bar, The Salty Pig, Saloniki, EVOO, Dig Inn and State Park with many more restaurants interested in participating in the next rounds.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As we approach the end of our first decade, Future Chefs has moved from a founder led and directed organization to an organization with expanding leadership. We have weathered a series of threats (recession, moves) to deepen our practice and build a reputation for grassroots work supported by best practices. Expanded leadership has helped build and strengthen staff competency. Growth has also meant the need to increase operations capacity to sustain growth. That means investing in data collection and analysis and refining our budgeting process and ensuring succession for all key positions.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Toni Elka
CEO Term Start Oct 2007
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Ms. Elka understands that life after high school is a risky time for students without a plan, adult support and coaching. She was a cook, caterer and youth development leader for many years, and her passion for the culinary arts fueled her sense of excitement about directing a career program that addresses the needs of youth who might find fulfillment in this creative, hands-on field. In 2007, she sought and singularly found the funding and support to launch Future Chefs.
 
Ms. Elka holds a B.F.A. with honors from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and a Certificate from the Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership at Boston University. She received national recognition for her innovative leadership (Mass. Statewide Peer Leadership Institute) and founded the Circle of Girls program prior to Future Chefs. In 2013 she received a Boston Neighborhood Fellows Award from the Philanthropic Institute and serves on the boards of Boston Day and Evening Academy and The Boston Private Industry Council. In May of 2015, Ms. Elka received an Honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Newbury College.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience


Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Carolyn Grimes Program Director
Prior to joining Future Chefs, Ms. Grimes was the Program Director for Graduate Community Engagement and Service Learning for the Scott/Ross Center for Community Service at Simmons College and had supervised the graduate service programs since their inception in 2002. She also served as Director of the Scott/Ross Center Fellowship in Non-profit Management, which launched in 2011.
 
Well-versed in marketing, communications, sales, program management and public relations in both the non-profit and corporate sectors, Ms. Grimes has worked for the Jordan Marsh Company, Project Bread, The Copley Plaza Hotel, Massachusetts Convention Center Authority and Boston Design Magazine. She serves on the Inner City Weightlifting Board of Directors and chairs their Governance Committee.
 
Ms. Grimes received the Top Applied Paper award from the Eastern Communications Association for her research in the service-learning field and was selected to participate in the inaugural year of the New England Campus Compact Community Service Director fellowship. She holds an M.S. in Communications Management from Simmons College and a B.A. in Speech and Communications from Boston College. 

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Mass Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Governance/Funding Collaborations.  Future Chefs has a vast network of 71 education, community and industry partners. Secondary education and community partners provide a pipeline of participants; post-secondary education partners provide pathways and scholarships; industry partners provide employment opportunities, program development consultation and financial support; and capacity building partners provide organizational support.  Future Chefs is fiscally sponsored by Third Sector New England and collaborates with many funders including the Amelia Peabody Foundation, Angell Foundation, BNY Mellon, Cabot Family Charitable Trust, Liberty Mutual Foundation, Jane B. Cook 1992 Charitable Trust, Cummings Foundation, Schrafft Charitable Trust, Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family Foundation, State Street Foundation, Trefler Foundation, Millennium Partners, Citizens Bank Foundation, and the Van Otterloo Family Foundation. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In FY 16 the leadership team decided to build management level capacity in youth development, outcomes measurement and communications.

On the program side, we hired two key positions, Program Director and Youth Development Manager, to build and strengthen our programs and implement best youth development practices. Additionally, we participated in The Impact Initiative (www.theimpactinitiative.net) to revise our logic model and expand our use of Salesforce to develop best outcomes measurement practices.
 
A Communications and Brand Manager was also hired to support and promote Future Chefs' work in the community. Working closely with the Marketing Committee, Future Chefs has identified the need to strengthen its brand and will roll out a new brand identity in 2017 and will continue to strengthen its communications to supporters and potential supporters through strategic social media, e-news and media relations.
 
The challenge in 2017 is to reflect positive youth development and Logic Model focus in our branding and marketing to better communicate the strength of our work and to sustain these changes through funding and management strategies. 
 

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 8
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 40
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--
--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Patricia M. Keegan Ed.D.
Board Chair Company Affiliation ClearRock Consulting
Board Chair Term Oct 2017 - Sept 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Chris Douglass Tavolo, Ashmont Grill Voting
Gabriel Dym J.D. Eckert, Seamans, Cherin and Mellott, LLP Voting
Erin Griffith Middlehouse Events Voting
Patricia M. Keegan Ed.D. ClearRock Consulting Voting
Travis Keltner State Street Corporation --
Susan Lange Commonwealth Corporation --
Robin Manna Harvard Business School Voting
Thomas Muldoon CPA Alexander, Aronson & Finning Voting
Robert Ocko Former Banker and Restaurant Owner --
Ellie O'Keefe Nestle Waters North America Voting
Eric Papachristos Trade, Co-Owner, Director of Finance --
Julia Shanks Julia Shanks Food Consulting Voting
Kay Snowden Third Sector New England Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 7
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Governance and Nominating
  • Marketing

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Governance has expanded and differentiated into solid committees, We began with a restaurant industry base on the council, added different competencies, built committees, assessed if and when we would consider becoming an independent 501c3 and are currently working on goals to add more racial diversity and bring on successful alums to our governance. In addition, we are identifying organizational needs, such as IT and evaluation competency, and will seek those talents for our board.


Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2016 to Sept 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,161,460.00
Projected Expense $1,251,001.00
Form 990s

2015 TSNE 990

2014 TSNE 990

2013 TSNE 990

Audit Documents

2015 TSNE Audit

2014 TSNE Audit

2013 TSNE Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $876,841 $712,571 $466,283
Total Expenses $670,892 $493,808 $519,702

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$737,984 $544,350 $276,000
Government Contributions $48,101 $72,680 $28,388
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $48,101 $72,680 $28,388
Individual Contributions $88,244 $81,019 $73,146
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- $10,942 $20,050
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $2,512 $3,580 $68,699

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $548,187 $420,778 $465,283
Administration Expense $71,881 $52,845 $49,689
Fundraising Expense $50,824 $20,185 $4,730
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.31 1.44 0.90
Program Expense/Total Expenses 82% 85% 90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 6% 3% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $571,685 $365,587 $161,265
Current Assets $571,685 $365,587 $161,265
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $40,194 $40,045 $54,486
Total Net Assets $531,491 $325,542 $106,779

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 14.22 9.13 2.96

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Our Advisory Council Finance Committee meets monthly, led by AAF/CPA partner, Thomas Muldoon CPA, retired banker Rob Ocko, and restaurant owner, Erik Papachristos (Trade, Porto, Saloniki). The focus is on insuring that our financial needs are addressed in a timely and reasonable fashion. We work to provide oversight to budget process and identify potential risks and opportunities that are in the best interests of Future Chefs. The committee provides added capacity on the operations front and the Chair of the Development Committee, Travis Keltner is a liaison to the Finance Committee.

Foundation Comments

Futures Chefs is fiscally sponsored by Third Sector New England Inc. (TSNE). As such, the audits and 990s posted above are that of TSNE. The data in the charts and graphs reflects Future Chefs only and is per the supplementary pages of the TSNE audits, with additional data provided by the organization.

Documents


Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Future Chefs offers programming for low-income youth (ages 16 to 24) from Boston and Greater Boston designed to create a way out of the cycle of poverty, address the "skills gap" and provide young people with viable post-secondary options and a clear career pathway.

The three phase school-to-career engagement relies on a systemic collaboration with food service employers, social service agencies and educators to provide standards-based education, preparatory and work-base experiences, youth development, leadership opportunities and referral services. Future Chefs strives to prepare youth for quality early employment and post-secondary education opportunities in the culinary field and supports them in developing a broad base of transferable skills as they transition into the working world. 
 
There is an urgent need for clear career pathways and relevant post-secondary options for low-income Boston and Greater Boston youth. These youth face a difficult transition to a career because they lack the family or community networks necessary to (1) conceptualize and implement a viable post-secondary plan; (2) connect with the labor force on a regular basis; (3) establish a positive social support system and (4) overcome racial, socio-economic and personal barriers. Also, many (an estimated 50%) are either ill-equipped or unprepared to pursue a four-year college degree.
 
The labor market has become more demanding and many employers recognize the existence of a skills gap - young adults lack the training and the 21st century skills necessary to sustain a middle wage job. Many of these young adults are faced with figuring out what kind and how much education is necessary for them to succeed.

Future Chefs is well positioned to address the need for career pathways among youth by teaching culinary and life skills in a positive youth development environment. In the next three years, Future Chefs will continue to deepen its practice and refine services so that young people in Greater Boston have an opportunity to engage in meaningful work and become a financially stable member of their community.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Program staff members have focused on outreach activities over the past year, making great strides in developing new, and deepening existing relationships.  A special effort has been made by program staff to develop relationships with guidance counselors at different schools to identify youth who may have interest in the culinary field. Staff members have also attended training, career fairs, and youth development workshops through Health Resources in Action, Youth Worker training and other capacity building workshops offered by funding partners. 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Future Chefs is well positioned to address the need for career pathways among youth by teaching hard culinary skills and transferable soft skills in a positive youth development environment. Other Boston workforce development organizations with a culinary focus serve disengaged youth and adults. In contrast, Future Chefs intervenes earlier in the lives of youth and helps them to establish a pattern of success. 

Future Chefs has been focused on staff capacity and is well equipped to reach its goals. The Future Chefs leadership team is in place and meets regularly and a 14 member Advisory Council meets quarterly. Future Chefs has also added several committees to support its work, including a Financial Committee, Move Committee, Fundraising Committee and Marketing Committee.

Future Chefs has a strong network of collaborators including high school educations partners and secondary education partners, community partners, a large number of engaged industry partners, program development and financial support, and several collaborative support and capacity building partners that contribute toward organizational and program development.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Future Chefs is using a fully operational Salesforce system and has completed a refined outcome measurement protocol.

Progress is measured by Future Chefs' reach (number of participants at different levels of programming), the number of participants who reach key benchmarks in the pathway to long term employment such as a high school diploma, a marketable industry credential, some post-secondary education, solid job-readiness skills and short-term, transition employment. The number of participants who reach key benchmarks in the pathway to long term employment such as a high school diploma, a marketable industry credential, some post-secondary education, solid job-readiness skills and short-term, transition employment.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

In response to industry and student need, Future Chefs launched a formal Apprenticeship program in 2015. An Industry Advisory Council, in conjunction with Future Chefs, developed a list of ten goals that each apprentice must meet to complete the program, and progress toward these goals is measured on a weekly basis. Future Chefs provides the soft skills/educational component in-house through workshops that are tailored to the needs of the apprentices, using portions of "Signaling Success," a soft skills curriculum developed by Commonwealth Corp to connect teens and young adults to career pathways.

Apprentices spend approximately 40 hours per week in the kitchen of a high-end restaurant and attend two-hour soft skills workshops two times a month. Each apprentice is paid a stipend and is mentored by an on-site supervisor who oversees his or her progress.

Since the onset of the Apprenticeship program, we realized that the hourly wage being paid in the Apprenticeship had to be increased. Several youth opted for dead-end job instead. We increased the stipend and increased the weekly hours from 32 to 40 to make the program an economically viable option.

Future Chefs also addressed the need to expand our programming to help youth aged 18 to 24 who are not in school nor working and customize our hard and soft skills course work to meet the specific needs of parenting, homeless, and older unemployed youth. Getting them on a career track is critical. In response we created a new position for a designated youth development manager to ensure that all program design, implementation and evaluation is culturally responsive and grounded in good youth development practices. We also developed a better understanding of training needs and staffing qualifications. Beyond culinary skills, our staff must have the patience, insight, and experience to coach youth who live in risky and challenging environments.

We continue to expand our training programs to ensure that staff members are given the tools and support they need to succeed. We learned the importance of recruiting motivated youth and we were able to find youth who were a better fit for the FC Delivers program by forming a relationship with ABCD.  Still, as our UTEC colleague, Greg Croteau said in a recent article about youth who are struggling to find and retain work," It 's not a six- or nine-month journey.  Our young people are going to take a couple of years to work through their bump."  Future Chefs staff and leadership are deeply committed to the quest for sustainable strategies to address this need.