Share |

Safe Havens Interfaith Partnership Against Domestic Violence (fiscally sponsored by Third Sector New England)

 89 South Street, Suite 603
 Boston, MA 02111
[P] (617) 951-3980
[F] --
www.interfaithpartners.org
[email protected]
Anne Marie Hunter
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1991
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2261109

LAST UPDATED: 10/26/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

Safe Havens envisions a world where no one has to choose between faith and safety. 
 
Safe Havens is an interfaith organization that promotes hope and justice for those affected by domestic violence and elder abuse. Working as a bridge, Safe Havens strengthens the capacity of divers faith communities and service providers to collaborate to address domestic violence and elder abuse. Safe Havens develops and provides education, resources, and technical assistance to improve community responses to domestic violence and elder abuse. 

Mission Statement

Safe Havens envisions a world where no one has to choose between faith and safety. 
 
Safe Havens is an interfaith organization that promotes hope and justice for those affected by domestic violence and elder abuse. Working as a bridge, Safe Havens strengthens the capacity of divers faith communities and service providers to collaborate to address domestic violence and elder abuse. Safe Havens develops and provides education, resources, and technical assistance to improve community responses to domestic violence and elder abuse. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Sept 01, 2017 to Aug 31, 2018
Projected Income $414,514.00
Projected Expense $382,593.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Engagement Campaign: Strengthening Faith Community Responses to Domestic and Sexual Violence and Elder Abuse
  • National Technical Assistance Programming

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Safe Havens envisions a world where no one has to choose between faith and safety. 
 
Safe Havens is an interfaith organization that promotes hope and justice for those affected by domestic violence and elder abuse. Working as a bridge, Safe Havens strengthens the capacity of divers faith communities and service providers to collaborate to address domestic violence and elder abuse. Safe Havens develops and provides education, resources, and technical assistance to improve community responses to domestic violence and elder abuse. 

Background Statement

Since 1991, Safe Havens has been training “first responders” in faith communities to help victims of domestic and sexual violence (D/SV) and elder abuse access the services and support they need to be safe.
Currently, 1 in 4 women will experience DV in her lifetime, and 1 in 6 women and 1 in 33 men will experience an attempted or completed rape. In the U.S., 37% of the women in hospital emergency rooms are there because of DV. Research shows that elder abuse affects more than 1 in 10 older Americans and results in a shortened life expectancy. This violence puts individuals in danger, families at risk, and communities in crisis. Victims of D/SV and elder abuse face many barriers to getting the help and support they need. They may not know where to turn. They may not be able to afford to leave. They may be too ashamed to prosecute. Research shows that victims turn to their faith leaders for help more often than they call hotlines or police. Unfortunately, most people in faith communities don’t know how to respond effectively.
Safe Havens empowers strong, caring people in diverse (Jewish, Christian, and Muslim) faith communities in Greater Boston to address D/SV and elder abuse. Because they are so often the first place victims turn for help, Safe Havens views faith leaders and faith community members as “First Responders”: the first line of defense against abuse and assault. Just as a firemen wouldn’t rush into a burning building without training, these community First Responders need training, resources, and partnerships with local D/SV services to respond safely and appropriately. With the support of trusted friends in their faith community, victims can access services much earlier and those who abuse are more likely to change. Also, with age appropriate prevention education in congregations, violence can be prevented in the next generation and the cycle of violence can be broken. In addition, faith leaders, who often set community standards, can use their influence to change social norms and make D/SV and elder abuse unthinkable and unacceptable. Every human being deserves to live in safety and with dignity. Every person deserves to grow old free of the manipulation and exploitation that is elder abuse. Safe Havens is proud of it ground-breaking training, resource development, advocacy, and technical assistance that help us accomplish our ultimate goal: creating a world free of domestic and sexual violence and elder abuse.

Impact Statement

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, almost 25% of women and 7.5% of men have been assaulted by an intimate partner. Untold numbers of children and other family members are also affected.
We know that “victims, survivors, and surviving family members consistently turn to their faith communities for support and safety.” (Georgia Domestic Violence Fatality Review, 2009). Unfortunately, many faith leaders lack the skills to respond effectively. Safe Havens provides training, resources, skills, and expertise to help faith community leaders respond effectively to victims of domestic violence and elder abuse and their families.
In Fiscal Year 2017, Safe Havens:
Provided training to over 1,000 faith leaders (including lay leaders) and allied professionals locally and across the county on the importance of a faith response to domestic and sexual violence and elder abuse, 
Continued partnering with the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life to create the first ever training model for elder abuse and faith and pilot tested in 2 sites. Expected completion during Fall 2017.
Expanded it Safe with Faith program through a grant from the Cummings Foundation's 100K for 100, 
Through its National Technical Assistance Project, continued working with rural faith leaders and service providers in an additional 9 rural communities across the county, providing training and resources (for a total of 18 sites trained between FY 2016 - 17),
Celebrated 25 years of promoting hope and justice for victims and survivors of domestic and sexual violence and elder abuse.

Needs Statement

Over the past few years, Safe Havens' funding model has changed. Right now, our most pressing need is to find a way to fund our local programs, on which our national work has been built.
Other top needs are:
Assistance with capacity building so we have the operational/administrative staff to grow our work.
Public relations and community connections.
Safe Havens friends and ambassadors who have learned about our work and want to serve on our Board
Support to host a Life Together Fellow for ongoing capacity-building work ($15,000/year)
 

CEO Statement

Since 1991, Safe Havens has worked at the intersection of faith and domestic violence. We believe that faith can be an important resource for victims and survivors of domestic violence and elder abuse. We dream of and work toward a world in which faith communities respond with compassion to victims and survivors and provide links to community services such as domestic violence shelters, services, and support groups. We dream of and work toward a world in which faith leaders and communities are a natural part of the coordinated community response that helps victims of domestic violence and their families find justice and healing. And we dream of and work toward an end to domestic and sexual violence and elder abuse.

Board Chair Statement

In 1993 I was a founding Board Member of Safe Havens and currently serve as the Chair of the Board. Safe Havens began at my local congregation, Old West United Methodist Church and has grown to be a national leader and interfaith bridge builder. I have supported the staff in strategic thinking, fundraising and presence through the years. Because the majority of victims turn to their faith leaders for help, it is imperative that clergy and lay leaders of all faiths are trained to put safety first for the abused, know how to refer to social services and take a clear stand that abuse in all its many forms is not acceptable in a faith-filled, healthy relationship. Finally, it is important for donors to know that Safe Havens has incredible annual impact and spends every dollar wisely.In the wake of the 2008 recession and resultant reductions in government spending and challenges with VAWA funding, the board developed and approved a new strategic plan to adapt to the changing fiscal environment. This new strategic plan builds on the success of our federal work and renews our focus on local programming and violence prevention efforts. Going forward, our local work will expand and inform our efforts on the national level, which in turn will add dimension and a national perspective to our local work.

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
NATIONAL
--

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Violence Shelters and Services
  2. Religion- Related - Interfaith Coalitions
  3. Religion- Related - Alliances & Advocacy

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Community Engagement Campaign: Strengthening Faith Community Responses to Domestic and Sexual Violence and Elder Abuse

Safe Havens provides faith-based outreach, training, community organizing, and technical assistance to strengthen faith leaders’ responses to domestic and sexual violence and elder abuse. Safe Havens also works with domestic and sexual violence and elder abuse services, helping them understand the importance of faith for victims and survivors and how to partner with their local faith communities to increase access to much-needed support. To date, Safe Havens has worked with a majority of the Greater Boston domestic and sexual violence service providers, as well as many of the providers in Essex and Middlesex counties. In addition, over 500 diverse faith congregations in Essex, Middlesex, and Suffolk counties have received training or technical assistance from Safe Havens and 60 congregations have completed Safe Havens’ 22-hour domestic violence prevention training program.
Budget  $36,230.00
Category  Crime & Legal, General/Other Family Violence Prevention
Population Served Families Adults Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 
Safe Havens claims success when, as the result of our outreach, training, resources, etc. a faith leader (clergy or lay) better understands:
  • how the faith community can play an important role in the intervention and prevention of domestic and sexual violence and elder abuse
  • has learned the importance of referring to and partnering with the area’s domestic violence, sexual assault, and elder abuse service providers
  • how to listen to a victim and maintain confidentiality
Safe Havens also claims success when a domestic/sexual assault or elder abuse service provider contacts us for technical assistance, resources, or training so that they can help a faith-based victim be safe and remain faithful.
Program Long-Term Success 
Safe Havens will have achieved the ultimate long term success when:
1. Faith leaders and faith communities know how to respond to victims of domestic and sexual violence and elder abuse safely, confidentially, and effectively.
2. Service providers understand the role faith can play in the lives of victims and survivors.
3. Victims and survivors do not feel they have to “check their faith at the door” when meeting with their service provider, nor do they have to sanitize or minimize the abuse to their faith leaders.
4. Faith communities and service providers have established partnerships to address a victims needs and no one has to choose between faith and safety.
Program Success Monitored By  Safe Havens has monitored its programming success with short evaluations given prior to and at the close of an event or training. In the Spring of 2014, Safe Havens began implementing a new outcomes measurement model, along with updated pre- and post- evaluations.The new evaluations will allow Safe Havens to collect quantitative as well as qualitative data.
Examples of Program Success  After 2 recent trainings of faith community leaders (clergy and lay): 96% better understood sexual and domestic violence; 96% had an improved understanding of the issues facing victims and survivors of domestic and sexual violence; 87% felt they had developed skills for addressing domestic and sexual violence, including how and where to refer to area service providers; and 83% better understood the role of the faith community in addressing domestic and sexual violence. More anecdotally, “This Safe Havens program has shown me that silence in the pulpit can be the same as perpetrating domestic violence—we must re-teach our congregants.” The training “increased awareness, opened dialogue, and created opportunities to address prevention.” And from a survivor, “The thing we want clergy to do is listen. It takes so much energy, strength, and courage to speak up. When a victim is ready to speak, clergy HAVE to listen. Clergy shouldn’t say ‘we’re out of time,’ or ‘I have a meeting.’”

National Technical Assistance Programming

  
Budget  $150,000.00
Category  Crime & Legal, General/Other Family Violence Prevention
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success     
Program Long-Term Success     
Program Success Monitored By      
Examples of Program Success        

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Rev. Dr. Anne Marie Hunter
CEO Term Start Aug 1991
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Anne Marie Hunter
is an ordained United Methodist pastor.She received an M.Div. from Harvard Divinity School in 1986 and a Ph.D.
in Religion and Society from Drew University in 1991. While attending Harvard
and Drew, Hunter worked for two battered women’s service groups: Harbor Me in
East Boston, MA and Jersey Battered Women’s Services in Morristown, NJ. Hunter
also served for six years as the pastor of East Saugus United Methodist Church
in Saugus, Massachusetts.In 1991,
Hunter linked her pastoral, seminary, and domestic violence services experience
and founded Safe Havens Interfaith Partnership Against Domestic Violence, a
small, grassroots nonprofit. Safe Havens empowers diverse faith communities to
respond to victims with resources, support, and referrals and helps faith
communities and service providers work together to address domestic violence
and elder abuse. Safe Havens’ work in the Greater Boston area has been both
collaborative and transformative.To
date, 60 Muslim, Christian, and Jewish congregations have participated in
intensive training, while hundreds of congregations and faith leaders in
Massachusetts, New England, and across the country have been touched by Safe
Havens’ outreach, training, technical assistance, and resources. Since 2003,
Safe Havens has provided Technical Assistance to the U.S. Department of
Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women. Current national projects include
Elder Abuse and Faith and Domestic and Sexual Violence and Faith in Rural
Communities.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Alyson Morse Katzman -- Alyson Morse Katzman earned her Master’s Degree in Public Administration from New York University. Alyson creates, coordinates, and implements Safe Havens’ local and national outreach, advocacy, and education regarding sexual and domestic violence and elder abuse. Alyson also provides national technical assistance on domestic violence and faith, elder abuse and faith, and domestic and sexual violence and faith in rural communities through Safe Havens’ national Technical Assistance projects, which are funded by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women. Alyson is actively involved in Greater Boston’s Jewish Domestic Violence Coalition as well as in Jewish Women International’s Interfaith Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Alyson has worked in public and non-profit management for 26 years and with Safe Havens since 2000.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 6
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Barbara Burnside
Board Chair Company Affiliation New England Conference of The United Methodist Church
Board Chair Term Jan 2016 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2016 -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Rev. Traci Jackson Antoine Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts Voting
Elsa Bengel Training, Inc., YMCA of Greater Boston, Director Emeritus Voting
Barbara Burnside New England Conference, United Methodist church, Mission Coordinator/Disaster Volunteer Coordinator Voting
Carol Kopelman MBA, MPH Community Volunteer Voting
Tami Lewis Community Volunteer Voting
Dr. Nancy Nienhuis Andover Newton Theological School, Dean of Students & VP for Strategic Iniatives Voting
Jake Segal Social Finance Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 5
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Safe Havens is looking to expand its Board.  Requirements are an interest in Safe Havens and the work we do and a willingness to commit to representing Safe Havens in the greater community.  For more information, please contact 
Safe Havens at [email protected]

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $459,537 $281,257 $361,820
Total Expenses $326,647 $313,852 $339,647

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- $98,425 $59,345
Government Contributions $232,981 $162,307 $272,497
    Federal $232,981 $162,307 $267,997
    State -- -- $4,500
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $177,159 $15,618 $25,775
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $49,350 $4,265 $3,725
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $47 $642 $478

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $284,517 $277,400 $297,055
Administration Expense $38,930 $33,952 $39,809
Fundraising Expense $3,200 $2,500 $2,783
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.41 0.90 1.07
Program Expense/Total Expenses 87% 88% 87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 1% 1% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $154,382 $56,946 $71,823
Current Assets $154,382 $56,946 $71,823
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $11,991 $9,405 $19,518
Total Net Assets $142,391 $47,541 $52,305

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 12.87 6.05 3.68

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Please note that Safe Havens' 2018 current income projections reflect the Cummings Grant of $100,000 that was awarded to Safe Havens in FY2017. Safe Havens is spreading out that funding over 3 years.

Foundation Comments

This organization is fiscally sponsored by Third Sector New England (TSNE). The Form 990s and Audits posted above are per TSNE for your reference. Page 21 of the TSNE Audit document(s) contains financial data pertaining specifically to Safe Havens Interfaith Partnership Against Domestic Violence. As such the financial data in the charts and graphs above is that of Safe Havens Interfaith Partnership Against Domestic Violence, per the TSNE Audit document with additional expense breakout detail and asset/liability detail provided by the nonprofit.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Safe Havens Interfaith Partnership Against Domestic Violence aims to change social norms to support healthy, nonviolent relationships by building bridges between faith communities and service providers. Our goal is to shape faith leaders and communities that are capable of effective intervention to help survivors reach safety before crises escalate. We hope to build faith communities that pro-actively engage in domestic violence prevention through youth education, premarital counseling and congregational development. We also aim to educate domestic violence service providers about the complicated faith-based concerns survivors face. Ultimately, building trusting partnerships between faith communities and service providers will help more survivors will reach safety and find healing.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

In order to accomplish these goals, Safe Havens:
Provides training and resources for faith leaders and communities (Christian, Jewish and Muslim) in Greater Boston about domestic and sexual violence and elder abuse.Works nationally in rural communities to build partnerships between local faith communities and service providers.Provides technical assistance and educational resources for service providers and advocates to better understand the role of faith in the lives of survivors.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

The staff and Board of Safe Havens include clergy members, experts in domestic violence, survivors, law enforcement, and educators. The organization has existed for 26 years in Greater Boston and made hundreds of connections to local and national faith communities. Through Jane Doe Inc., we are connected to domestic violence and sexual assault agencies across Massachusetts. We are supported by the Office on Violence Against Women for our national rural work.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

We will know we are making progress when:
Direct service providers can address faith concerns comfortably while assisting survivors.Faith leaders and their communities recognize signs of abuse, support survivors, and refer survivors to resources and services.Faith leaders and service providers trust each other and work together to support survivors.Faith leaders are engaged in the movement to end domestic violence and elder abuse.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

We are making progress in each of these categories, but still have a lot to accomplish. While we have secured funding for our national rural work over the next couple of years, we are lacking support to further our local work with Greater Boston faith communities. We are starting a new "Safe with Faith" volunteer program to engage local faith congregations more systematically in our work and need your help to get this program off the ground!