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Youth Design Inc.

 48 Rutland Street, 4th Floor
 Boston, MA 02118
[P] (857) 277-1737
[F] (617) 266 4527
www.youthdesign.org
[email protected]
Tony Richards
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INCORPORATED: 2011
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 61-1588242

LAST UPDATED: 04/20/2016
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Youth Design empowers talented urban youth to pursue a path to higher education and promising equitable careers by engaging the professional design community to mentor, educate, train and employ the next generation of highly skilled professionals. 

Mission Statement

Youth Design empowers talented urban youth to pursue a path to higher education and promising equitable careers by engaging the professional design community to mentor, educate, train and employ the next generation of highly skilled professionals. 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2015 to Dec 31, 2015
Projected Income $473,000.00
Projected Expense $462,062.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Year Round Enrichment and Workshops
  • Youth Design Academy
  • Youth Design Studio
  • Youth Design Workplace Immersion

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Youth Design empowers talented urban youth to pursue a path to higher education and promising equitable careers by engaging the professional design community to mentor, educate, train and employ the next generation of highly skilled professionals. 


Background Statement

Founded in 2003 by Denise Korn, principal of Korn Design, a nationally recognized brand strategy and design firm with offices in Boston and New York, Youth Design has gained a national reputation for reinventing a model of mentoring that opens career pathways for talented urban youth.   

Youth Design’s multi-dimensional program spans three summers and the academic years between them.

Summer I: The Youth Design Academy is a unique learning experience that combines creative classroom art and design skill building with exposure to professional designers and their work processes for rising juniors. At its core is a 7-week course in Fundamentals of Design at Massachusetts College of Art and Design for which students receive high school elective credits and three college credits.

Summer II & III: Design Workplace Immersion provides an opportunity for Youth Designers who have completed the Youth Design Academy to work in a design workplace, side by side with professional designers who serve as mentors. These full-time summer jobs give Youth Designers seven weeks of hands-on training in fields ranging from architecture and graphic design to digital media and fashion while building supportive relationships that inspire them to achieve..

Year-Round Enrichment Workshops: Youth Design’s year-round enrichment program consists of a myriad of workshops and exposure opportunities. Each Thursday throughout the summer and once monthly throughout the school-year, Youth Designers are engaged in working sessions focused on preparing them for the workforce as well providing them with support with academics, college applications and financial aid, financial literacy, and portfolio development.

The Design Studio: Located at Youth Design’s headquarters in Boston’s South End is an all access state of the art computer center equipped with design software typically used by professional designers and not typically found on most personal or publically accessed computers. In addition to providing the opportunity for Youth Designers to gain more intensive one-on-one training in design software, recently students have been employed to work on commissioned client projects under the leadership of professional design volunteers and Youth Design staff. The studio also provides a welcoming environment for current Youth Designers and alumni to work on their own creative, academic, and freelance projects.


Impact Statement

In 2015, Youth Design:

  1.       Enrolled 16 creative urban young people in Youth Design’s Academy through Massachusetts College of Art, all of whom earned both high school and college credits upon graduation. 
  2.      Assigned 18 Youth Designers to professional design mentors and provided each of them with critical paid internships in a variety of settings across the city.
  3.      Engaged 13 youth designers in design projects commissioned by the City of Boston, Liberty Mutual, and Troy Boston.
  4.      Exposed more than 1000 Boston Public School students to professional designers and the idea of design as an equitable career through our Meet the Designer Series.
  5.      Engaged youth designers in over 100 hours of intense, hands on workshops focused on academic support, college applications and financial aid, financial literacy, and portfolio development.
Youth Design's unique model of mentoring seeks to achieve the following goals:  
  1.      Provide opportunities for the development of highly marketable, 21st century skills for underserved, creative urban youth.
  2.       Provide two paid summer employment opportunities within the design industry.
  3.      Provide access to committed professional design mentors who guide students along their academic and professional path.
This reinvented model of mentoring, through the lens of design, is a powerful solution to closing the economic achievement gap for creative urban youth. Youth Design is poised to double its impact this summer by enrolling thirty-two students into the Youth Design Academy and placing thirty-five youth designers into paid internships.  
 

Needs Statement

Youth Design is scaling to serve a record number of creative urban teens this year.  As a result of our critical partnership with Massachusetts College of Art, Youth Design plans to double its impact by enrolling thirty-two students into the Academy, while placing twenty-eight youth designers in paid summer internships.  To that end, Youth Design has the following financial and human capital needs:
  •      Operating funds necessary to build the capacity and infrastructure necessary to broaden impact, manage, and evaluate Youth Design’s ever evolving and expanding programs.
  •       Programmatic funding to support Youth Design’s two-year program model, including the Youth Design Academy, Workplace Immersion Program, Design Skill Workshops and the Design Studio.
  •       Professional design volunteers to serve as Workplace Immersion mentors, workshop facilitators, and/or virtual art directors.

CEO Statement

I joined Youth Design as its first Executive Director in June of 2014. I am inspired and excited about taking Youth Design to the next level, and I see tremendous potential for life-changing impact.  

From my own personal and professional experiences I believe all teens, especially those living in underserved inner-city neighborhoods, need three key components to become successful: quality education, a career pathway, and social mobility. Youth Design is a dynamic organization with core programmatic components that provide all three! Youth Design was founded in 2003 in partnership with AIGA, the National Professional Association for Design, the City of Boston, and Boston Public Schools. In the 10+ years of Youth Design, we have established that urban high school youth who are engaged in relevant workforce development & education opportunities that match their personal passion & talent are more likely to become invested in their future. Youth Design is a vital pathway for urban youth into the design industry promoting diversity, economic equity, and cultural competency.

Youth Design targets a diverse cadre of talented urban youth in terms of race, ethnicity, geography, and socio-economic status. This year, more than 50% of our participants hail from Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan, 95% percent are young people of color, and more than 55% receive free or reduced lunch. At Youth Design, we believe that every young person with passion, talent and drive deserves the opportunity to transform their untapped creativity into a college education and equitable career.

“No program, anywhere, has been as successful as Youth Design in two critical elements of design mentoring: igniting the excitement of uninitiated youth in experiencing creativity for meaningful purposes and sticking with the young people so the experience is more than a fleeting entertainment. Youth Design has done it right and shows the results in changing young people’s lives so they too can change the human experience.”

Ric Grefe, CEO-AIGA, the Professional Association for Design

Tony Richards, Executive Director


Board Chair Statement

In late 2013, I accepted the position of Board Chair of Youth Design, Inc. The organization is not new to me as I have been on the board since its inception and have been acquainted with Denise Korn and Youth Design since its founding in 2004.

Beginning in January 2014, I begin my term as Chair, focusing on enhancing the organization’s fundraising and development efforts to increase infrastructure and build capacity in line with our efforts to achieve sustainability. I will also concentrate on growing the Board from 8 current members to 12 during the course of the year.

Youth Design provides talented urban high school students with access to the design industry directly impacting the creative economic equity among urban youth. Addressing workforce readiness, and youth development and academic enrichment through the lens of design, provides a unique backdrop from which students are exposed to pathways that support the identification and development of skills needed to become professional members of the 21st Century workforce.

Were it not for Youth Design, many talented urban high schools students would be denied opportunities to explore the design industry and identify all of the viable career options the industry can provide them.

Youth Design's innovative programming provides highly immersive and enriching opportunities for students to experience “real-world” professional work environments, develop relationships with design mentors and peers, enrich general academic performance and align the skills necessary to become professionals,further illustrating the importance of the need for higher educational attainment and completion.

The ability for talented urban high school students to take part in professional work experiences at the country's leading design firms and organizations provides a significant platform for Youth Design to engage the private sector design community around its work to promote lasting social change through a creative lens..

I am excited for what the next 10 years holds for Youth Design and look forward to continuing to play a role in the overall growth and development of the organization. If there is ever a question about the collective impact the public and private sector can have through engaging in collaborative efforts to support the positive self-development of urban youth; one must only look to the work of Youth Design as a model for engaging an industry to achieve social change in the lives of Boston Public high school students.

Robert Lewis Jr.

Youth Design Board Chair

 


Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

We know that the disparity in educational quality is greatly delineated by race and socioeconomic status, and that poverty is directly correlated with educational attainment and lifetime earnings. This is especially true for the youth who live in Boston's largest inner-city communities of Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan. Youth Design’s unique model of mentoring breaks this cycle by targeting students from these communities in its student recruitment efforts. The entry point to Youth Design is the Youth Design Academy, offered to rising high school sophomores followed by the guarantee of two paid summer internships after their junior and senior years. This year, Youth Design will engage and mentor sixty-seven young people, evenly split between male and female. More than 50% of our participants hail from Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan, 95% percent are young people of color, and more than 55% receive free or reduced lunch.

 

 

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Education - Secondary & High Schools
  3. Employment - Employment Preparation & Procurement

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Year Round Enrichment and Workshops

Youth Design’s year-round enrichment program consists of a myriad of workshops and exposure opportunities. Each Thursday throughout the summer and once monthly throughout the school-year, Youth Designers are engaged in working sessions focused on preparing them for the workforce as well providing them with support with academics, college applications and financial aid, financial literacy, and portfolio development. Visits to local cultural institutions including the Museum of Fine Arts, the Institute of Contempory Art, and various performances are also offered throughout the year. Further, Youth Design’s Meet the Designer series is offered to Youth Designers and other Boston Public School students throughout the year – reaching more than 1000 young people annually. This series was created as a way to expose even more creative urban youth to the world of design as an equitable career, and inspire their curiosity to learn more about how they can achieve their own personal education and career goals.
Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Short-term Goals:

1. Provide opportunities for the development of highly marketable 21st Century skills for underserved creative urban youth.2. Provide two paid summer employment opportunities within the design industry.

3. Provide access to committed professional design mentors who guide students along their academic and professional path.

Program Long-Term Success 

 

Long-term Goals:

1. Expand and bring to fruition the untapped creative talent of disenfranchised youth, propelling the next generation of designers onto a path of higher education and a vibrant career.

2. Promote the role of design in the creative economy.

3. Provide a vehicle to engage leading design firms and corporations that want to make a positive and sustaining impact in Boston’s inner-city communities.

Program Success Monitored By 

Youth Design measures progress toward these goals through a variety of tracking mechanisms including pre- and post- surveys. These surveys track hard and soft skills at baseline and upon completion of each program area. Hard-skills include: proficiencies in utilizing design software, drawing, and design processes. Soft-skills include: collaboration and team work; leadership; problem solving; creative thinking; communication; professionalism; maturity; perseverance and drive. In addition to surveys, Youth Design also relies on a combination of students’ self-evaluations and reflections, mentor assessments, and partner evaluations that track progress and growth.

Examples of Program Success 

Yamilet was born in the Dominican Republic, grew up in Dorchester, and attended Madison Park Technical Vocational High School where she became interested in design. Yamilet was accepted into Youth Design in 2012 and successfully completed internships at Youth Design and Northeastern University’s Office of Creative Services. These experiences encouraged Yamilet to pursue her passion so she attended Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology to improve her academics and prepare for design school. While there, Yamilet obtained a part-time position in the admissions office using her design skills to assist the department with marketing and communications materials. She also stayed actively engaged in Youth Design and participated in a commission client project, working with peers to create a billboard design for Liberty Mutual. While at Ben Franklin, Yamilet applied for an Adobe Youth Voices college scholarship and was one of only 25 students worldwide to be awarded the honor as a result of her design skills and the portfolio she had created throughout her time with Youth Design. Yamilet is now a freshman at Lesley University’s College of Art and Design and the first person in her family to attend college. Yamilet describes Youth Design as “the best opportunity a teen in Boston could ever get.”


Youth Design Academy

The Youth Design Academy is a unique learning experience that combines creative classroom art and design skill building with exposure to professional designers and their work processes for rising juniors. At its core is a 7-week course in Fundamentals of Design at Massachusetts College of Art and Design for which students receive high school elective credits and three college credits. This course provides an introduction to how visual principles form the basis of design and helps students develop sensitivity to visual language. Students learn how form is manipulated to convey meaning, explore strategies for idea generation and development of unique concepts, and gain an understanding of the designer’s role as visual storyteller. The Youth Design Academy is our platform for preparing our students with 21st Century skills so that they may compete and be successful in today’s economy.
Budget  $154,119.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Youth Designers graduate from the Academy with a full understanding of the fundamentals of design as well as proficiency in the software necessary to study design and/or produce design materials.  
Program Long-Term Success  The Youth Design Academy provides participants with instruction and exposure to an array of design disciplines.  It is our goal to further ignite their curiously, provide them with technical design skills, and empower them to achieve their full potential in high school, college and beyond.  
Program Success Monitored By  Youth Design measures progress toward these goals through a variety of tracking mechanisms including pre- and post- surveys. These surveys track hard and soft skills at baseline and upon completion of each program area. Hard-skills include: proficiencies in utilizing design software, drawing, and design processes. Soft-skills include: collaboration and team work; leadership; problem solving; creative thinking; communication; professionalism; maturity; perseverance and drive.
Examples of Program Success 

Juni came to Youth Design in 2012 after hearing about the program through a workshop at his high school. Growing up in the Heath Street public housing development, Juni was unsure of how to channel his creative spirit and love for art into anything more than just a hobby. As a rising junior, Youth Design placed Juni in an internship at Suffolk University – his first ever work experience. Juni was thrilled to not only have the opportunity to hone his design skills, but to contribute financially to his family. The following school year, Juni continued to take additional courses in graphic design at Madison Park and at Mass College of Art but remained unsure of what was next for him. Though he was not quite ready to matriculate to college directly after graduation, Juni stayed connected to Youth Design and at that time engaged in it’s newly launched year-round enrichment program. These workshops in college readiness, financial literacy and the like sparked Juni’s ambition to pursue higher education. Through his relationship with Youth Design, he was accepted into the foundation year program at Northeastern University. Having completed that program successfully, Juni was awarded a full scholarship to Northeastern University and is currently studying engineering. He remains an active Youth Design alum.


Youth Design Studio

Launched in November of 2015, the Design Studio located at Youth Design’s headquarters in Boston’s South End is an all access state of the art computer arts center equipped with design software typically used by professional designers and not typically found on most personal or publically accessed computers. Youth Design has just begun to scratch the surface of the many creative and critical ways to utilize this extraordinary space. In addition to providing the opportunity for Youth Designers to gain more intensive one-on-one training in design software, recently students have been employed to work on commissioned client projects under the leadership of professional design volunteers and Youth Design staff. The studio also provides a welcoming environment for current Youth Designers and alumni to work on their own creative, academic, and freelance projects.

Budget  $52,261.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Short Term Goals Include:

A) Support increases in the high school graduation rate of urban youth

 B) Increase exposure and access to the design industry by urban youth from at-risk communities throughout Boston

C) Maintain a balance among urban youth participants stemming from different socio-economic background

D) Reduce the disparity in general educational strength (e.g. GPA) over the course of the program

E) Develop student’s proficiency with the use of digital design tools and applications

F) Support increases in the matriculation of urban students from at-risk neighborhoods into 2 or 4-year colleges and universities

G) Enhance student’s high-level design thinking and workforce readiness through participation in 2 paid-summer design internships, cultural and visual literacy outings, and ongoing project based design education and skills training projects

H) Increase the life and social skills of urban youth through the delivery of design education and skills training opportunities

Program Long-Term Success 

Long Term Goals Include:

A) Inspire and motivate youth to pursue college and professional careers through mentorship by professional designers, Youth Design volunteers, design educators and staff

B) Equip urban youth with skills (design and life skills) that will empower them to leverage their design talent into a professional design or high skilled career

C) Provide opportunities for urban youth to develop and tap a network of resources in the private sector design industry for future internship and/or employment opportunities

D) Increase the number of urban youth who go on to pursue design majors in college

E) Increase the number of students who graduate from 2 or 4-year colleges or universities

F) Increase the number of urban youth who pursue design careers after college graduation

G) Monitor the number of urban youth who go on to pursue non-design careers after college

H) Increase diversity within the creative economy

I) Support students on their path to economic self-sufficiency

Program Success Monitored By 
Youth Design will monitor the following indicators to gauge program success: 
 
1) Periodic assessment of student’s knowledge and use of design tools and applications
2) Reduced disparity of design skills by background
3) Reduced disparity of design career motivation by background
4) Increased awareness of design careers over the course of the program
5) Increased academic performance over the course of the program
6) Increased life and social skills 
7) Increased understanding of higher educational attainment and completion to attain a professional career
8) Tracking students who pursue design majors in college
9) Tracking students who graduate from 2 or 4-year college or university
10) Tracking students who pursue design careers after college graduation
11) Tracking students who pursue non-design careers after college
Measurement will be conducted via surveys, student and mentor evaluations, periodic design skills assessments, GPA monitoring, and ongoing communication with alumni.
Examples of Program Success 

Juan Aguirre Youth Design

Class of 2012 – 2013 East Boston High School

 College: Montserrat College of Art

 

“I have learned a lot from Youth Design, which has proved to be very useful. I remember when I started the program. I had a good level of skill with the use of Adobe Photoshop, but that was the only tool I was able to use proficiently. Now, thanks to my mentors and the guidance of the Youth Design staff, I can easily work with programs such as InDesign and Illustrator; very important and useful tools for a designer. I feel much more comfortable using these programs, and I realized how practical they are for my personal work and pursuit of a career as a graphic designer.”


Youth Design Workplace Immersion

Summer II & III: Design Workplace Immersion provides an opportunity for Youth Designers who have completed the Youth Design Academy to work in a design workplace, side by side with professional designers who serve as mentors. These full-time summer jobs give Youth Designers seven weeks of hands-on training in fields ranging from architecture and graphic design to digital media and fashion while building supportive relationships that inspire them to achieve. Each Youth Designer is matched with a firm based on their interests and skills during the summers before their senior year in high school and freshman year in college. This opportunity to learn on the job skills, produce meaningful client-driven products, and build social capital within an otherwise exclusive sector confirms the reality that talented youth can transform their creative spirit into a viable career.


Budget  $144,031.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

Short Term Goals Include:

A) Support increases in the high school graduation rate of urban youth

B) Increase exposure and access to the design industry by urban youth from at-risk communities throughout Boston

C) Maintain a balance among urban youth participants stemming from different socio-economic background

D) Reduce the disparity in general educational strength (e.g. GPA) over the course of the program

E) Develop student’s proficiency with the use of digital design tools and applications

F) Support increases in the matriculation of urban students from at-risk neighborhoods into 2 or 4-year colleges and universities

G) Enhance student’s high-level design thinking and workforce readiness through participation in 2 paid-summer design internships, cultural and visual literacy outings, and ongoing project based design education and skills training projects

H) Increase the life and social skills of urban youth through the delivery of design education and skills training opportunities

Program Long-Term Success 

Long Term Goals Include:

A) Inspire and motivate youth to pursue college and professional careers through mentorship by professional designers, Youth Design volunteers, design educators and staff

B) Equip urban youth with skills (design and life skills) that will empower them to leverage their design talent into a professional design or high skilled career

C) Provide opportunities for urban youth to develop and tap a network of resources in the private sector design industry for future internship and/or employment opportunities

D) Increase the number of urban youth who go on to pursue design majors in college

E) Increase the number of students who graduate from 2 or 4-year colleges or universities

F) Increase the number of urban youth who pursue design careers after college graduation

G) Monitor the number of urban youth who go on to pursue non-design careers after college

H) Increase diversity within the creative economy

I) Support students on their path to economic self-sufficiency

Program Success Monitored By 
Youth Design will monitor the following indicators to gauge program success:
1) Periodic assessment of student’s knowledge and use of design tools and applications
2) Reduced disparity of design skills by background
3) Reduced disparity of design career motivation by background
4) Increased awareness of design careers over the course of the program
5) Increased academic performance over the course of the program
6) Increased life and social skills
7) Increased understanding of higher educational attainment and completion to attain a professional career
8) Tracking students who pursue design majors in college
9) Tracking students who graduate from 2 or 4-year college or university
10) Tracking students who pursue design careers after college graduation
11) Tracking students who pursue non-design careers after college
Measurement will be conducted via surveys, student and mentor evaluations, periodic design skills assessments, GPA monitoring, and ongoing communication with alumni.
Examples of Program Success 

 

Randy Aguilar YD '15 / Chelsea High School
Youth Design Academy
"Youth Design has opened my mind to real-world design firms and what designers do for a living"

 

Jessica Villar YD '15 / Brighton High School
Youth Design Academy
"The skills and knowledge I gained from Youth Design motivate me to keep going with my dreams and anything I want to do."
Lily Lu YD '14 / Boston Latin School
Summer Immersion Site: State Street
"Being trusted and relied upon despite my age was a really good feeling and helped me be more confident in myself"
Shirley Fang YD '13 / Boston Latin School / Wesleyan College
Summer Immersion Site: Tank Design
"I learned that there are many opportunities out there for me. I learned to ask for help and try things out no matter how foreign they may seem"

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Youth Design’s programming is focused on identifying and recruiting creative, urban public high school students who have a genuine desire to access and be exposed to career opportunities in the multi-faceted design industry. We target a diverse cadre of talented urban youth in terms of race/ethnicity, and socioeconomics living predominantly in Boston’s most at-risk communities along the spine in Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan. One of our priorities is to ensure that more students, teachers, parents and counselors are made aware of design as a viable career opportunity at the intersection where art meets design and that a reinvented model of mentoring, through the lens of design, is a powerful solution to closing the economic achievement gap for these talented urban youth.

 

Youth Design addresses workforce readiness, academic enrichment, and youth development of urban public high school students through programming which encompasses design education, design and life skills training, financial literacy, college readiness and workforce development through paid summer jobs. 

Understanding the make-up of the design industry, and its more than 20 professional industries helps to clarify the organization's rationale for employing design as a vehicle to promote social change. All professional design disciplines require solid math, science, reading and writing skills, as well as "soft-skills" in the areas of creative thinking, problem solving, leadership and communication.

 We believe that the professional design community has a responsibility to play an active role in mentoring and opening career pathways for the next generation. Youth Design deploys a reinvented model of mentoring, through the lens of design, as a core aspect of our program’s curriculum that we see as a powerful solution and essential element to closing the economic achievement gap for talented urban youth.

 By taking a holistic approach to serving youth, we strive to promote the positive self-development of urban high school students through their participation in "real-world" paid summer work experiences and access to professional design mentors, all of which help to fuel students' creativity and curiosity while providing opportunities for them to develop the skills they need to be successful in college, in their professional career and in life.

 

Areas of Design Disciplines include:

Architecture

Book Design

Boutique Design Specialty Firms

Branding

Consumer Research

Corporate Marketing

Design Research

Direct Mail Marketing

Fashion Design

Graphic Design

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Tony Richards
CEO Term Start June 2014
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Tony Richards brings a wide range of mentorship skills to his role as Executive Director of Youth Design, and has extensive experience leading nonprofit organizations. Previously, he was the director of the Elm Hill Family Service Center, one of the largest neighborhood sites within the Action for Boston Community Development citywide service center network.

While at ABCD, Inc., he created a year-round youth civic engagement program aimed at at-risk Boston youth, and provided paid opportunities for them to create effective strategies to increase urban democratic participation and community engagement. In addition, he managed one of the largest SummerWorks neighborhood sites in Boston, serving 100-plus low-income youth annually.

Richards is one of the founding trustees of the Grove Hall Trust, a resident-led neighborhood foundation that puts choice and control for investing grant dollars directly in the hands of the Boston’s Grove Hall community.

Tony also enjoys coaching youth basketball, and has assisted in the organizational development of the No Books No Ball basketball program, one of the largest and most established basketball enrichment programs in the country.

He serves as an Advisory Board Member at the Greater Boston YMCA Roxbury Branch, where he enjoys assisting youth at an institution that contributed so much to his own personal advancement.

Before his work in the nonprofit field, Richards worked in advertising, design, and creative marketing at Firstline Creative & Media, LLC, a global full-service marketing and communications agency based in Atlanta.

Richards earned a B.A. in Mass Communications from Clark Atlanta University. He has also received a certificate in Nonprofit Management and Leadership from Suffolk University's Sawyer Business School, at the Moakley Center for Public Management.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience

.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Alisa Aronson Education Director

 

In my role as Design Education Specialist, I am responsible for overseeing all facets of the organization’s design education and skills training programs in support of our mission to provide urban high school students with access to workforce readiness, youth development and academic enrichment opportunities delivered through the lens of design. Our design education and skills training programming plays a crucial role in supporting student’s development of the necessary skills to become professionals across any industry. Through design education and skills training we are able to more deeply align the importance of student's vesting in their current academic pursuits to achieve higher education attainment and completion. The result of which helps to pave the way to their designation as highly skilled members of the 21st century workforce and their subsequent economic self-sufficiency. 

Ms. Tara Small Director of Strategy and Development --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Mentor of the Year ROSOFF 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Currently, YD collaborates with the Private Industry Council (PIC), Boston Public Schools and Mass Art, targeting sophomores in late spring to join the new 27-month YD program beginning the summer before their junior year. The organization's partnership with PIC includes working closely with PIC advisors in the schools to help identify and refer prospective students to participate in Youth Design.

Massachusetts College of Art and Design has been a partner since the organization was founded in 2003, and serves as home base to Youth Design around the execution of both its summer and school year workshops and other programming activities. Annually, both orientation activities and graduation ceremonies are held at Mass College of Art and Design.

In addition to serving as the fiscal conduit for Youth Design during its first eight years of operation, the Association for Design Professionals, (AIGA) continues to play a critical role in engaging the local design community and recruitment of professional designer volunteers to support Youth Design.  Additionally, AIGA a national nonprofit organization with local chapters across the US, including Boston, continues to provide a national platform for Youth Design to increase awareness and visibility within the national design community. 

 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As previously noted, Youth Design received its 501(c) (3) in 2011, after 8 years of operating under the fiscal agency and governance of AIGA, the Professional Association of Design While this continues to be a highly successful partnership, fundraising was not part of the agreement, which impacted the organization at the time not yet an independent nonprofit. Denise Korn has continued to lead the organization since it’s founding and contribute significant in-kind hours in order to move the organization forward. In 2011, YD hired a full-time Program Director, enabling the organization to focus on its programming and evolving its robust and unique curriculum that continues to serve as a leading model nationally. At the end of December, 2013, the Program Director whom had evolved into the Managing Director role for YD relocated out of state and YD hired an Interim Managing Director. In 2014, I wish to transition from my role as Executive Director and focus primarily on public advocacy for YD and major gift fundraising; therefore, the Board has set a goal to generating funding necessary to hire a full-time Executive Director within the first 3 quarters of the fiscal year. This position will be responsible for overseeing the organization, including programming, development and finances. In turn, the role of the Managing Director will transition into that of a Program Manager focused solely on program administration to support the efforts of the Design Education Specialist whom is instrumental in delivering our curriculum and engaging the design community in our work. This necessary and vital re-structuring and bringing on a permanent Executive Director to replace me, as Founder, is consistent with the strategic plan, and the organization is aggressively seeking funds with the primary focus on operating and capacity building.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 150
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 66%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr Christopher West
Board Chair Company Affiliation Massachusetts Convention Center
Board Chair Term Jan 2016 - Dec 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Daren Bascome Proverb, LLC Voting
Josh Bruno Private Industry Council Voting
Damon Cox The Boston Foundation Voting
Mark Feldman Cause Consulting Voting
Martha Jones Snow Hill Strategies Voting
Denise Korn Korn Design Voting
Robert Lewis Jr. The Base Voting
Jeanne Nutt Gensler Voting
Imari Paris Jeffries Italian Home for Children Voting
Chris West Massachusetts Convention Center Authority Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 4
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In addition to the organizational development needs, the Board of Directors is keenly aware of the need to grow the Board to incorporate additional representatives from the design industry, both in terms of size and strength of leadership as well as financial support.  In 2013, we adopted a set of Board Guidelines & Expectations; established a minimum board giving level; adopted a Conflict of Interest Policy; and set up a Nominating Process. These were areas addressed in our original strategic plan of 2011.  In addition, the organization recently completed its third annual audit and form 990. The Finance Committee continues to be a very active committee and has oversight of the auditing and budgeting process

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2015 to Dec 31, 2015
Projected Income $473,000.00
Projected Expense $462,062.00
Form 990s

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

Audit Documents

2014 Review

2013 Review

2012 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $259,344 $196,790 $233,091
Total Expenses $235,727 $267,236 $206,260

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- $69,097
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $212,692 $169,530 $158,900
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- $50 $5,094
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $46,652 $27,210 --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $160,381 $183,189 $156,749
Administration Expense $36,336 $42,214 $30,877
Fundraising Expense $39,010 $41,833 $18,634
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.10 0.74 1.13
Program Expense/Total Expenses 68% 69% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 15% 21% 8%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $73,903 $37,831 $104,292
Current Assets $56,504 $28,991 $102,800
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $22,123 $9,668 $5,683
Total Net Assets $51,780 $28,163 $98,609

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $0.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.55 3.00 18.09

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

While challenging, we completed a three-year strategic plan with a detailed work plan that would guide the organization through 2014. The Plan addressed a number of priorities and objectives critical to any new organization; however, Youth Design had been successfully operating for eight years focused only on it’s “programming” needs, and some of our challenges were a bit different than a newly established organization. 

One of our major fundraising challenges, which continues to exist, is embedded in our identity: program vs. organization. Youth Design has evolved to a nationally recognized “platform for change” that is realized through its now year-round programming, advocacy and community partnerships. It is clear that our immediate financial needs are in the realm of operating and capacity building funding to support the appropriate infrastructure to serve our new model and meet our increased operational capacity-building.  

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Youth Design evaluates its impact based on the following goals: 

  •     Provide opportunities for the development of highly marketable, 21st century skills for underserved, creative urban youth.
  •     Provide two paid summer employment opportunities within the design industry.
  •     Provide access to committed professional design mentors who guide students along their academic and professional path.

Youth Design measures progress toward these goals through a variety of tracking mechanisms including pre- and post- surveys. These surveys track hard and soft skills at baseline and upon completion of each program area. Hard-skills include: proficiencies in utilizing design software, drawing, and design processes. Soft-skills include: collaboration and team work; leadership; problem solving; creative thinking; communication; professionalism; maturity; perseverance and drive. In addition to surveys, Youth Design also relies on a combination of students’ self-evaluations and reflections, mentor assessments, and partner evaluations that track progress and growth.

Central to Youth Design’s mission is its promise to educate, mentor, and employ the next generation of designers by engaging the professional design community. We cannot make good on that promise without cultivating industry leaders who understand the value in, and make a commitment to, a diversified workforce.  Despite how educated, prepared, or experienced our young people may be, their success depends on a creative economy ready and willing to embrace and employ them. In the long-term, Youth Design promotes diversity in the creative economy and raises awareness of design as an economic engine for urban youth.  


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Youth Design is the nation’s leading program focused on addressing the critical socio-economic needs of urban youth by teaching them highly marketable design skills, providing access to unparalleled professional mentors, and supporting them along the path toward higher education and self sufficiency. Our participants face overwhelming challenges based on race, socio-economic status, and lack of access to quality academic, enrichment, and workforce readiness opportunities and experiences. For the poor, urban youth of color we serve, pursuing their creative talent outside their school setting is often circumvented by their responsibility to obtain employment and contribute to their family financially after school and during the summer months. Youth Design offers its participants the opportunity to not only embrace their creative spirit for the fun of it - an opportunity all young people should be afforded - but provides them with paid, credit-bearing college level course-work, crucial life, college, and job readiness skills, and two paid summer internships with world class designers in professional design spaces. By focusing on eighteen design disciplines, from advertising and architecture to industrial and fashion design, Youth Design empowers creative urban youth with the education, skills, and network necessary to be successful in the 21st economy.

According to youth designer Cindalis, “Being a part of Youth Design has opened my eyes to many new experiences within the design world. This experience has helped me realize that I truly do enjoy graphic design, and I could see myself doing it for the rest of my life.” This realization is the spark that Youth Design seeks to ignite, and has been doing so successfully for thirteen years.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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