Share |

Talking Writing

 57 Grozier Road, Apartment #2
 Cambridge, MA 02138
[P] (617) 835-9410
[F] --
http://talkingwriting.com
[email protected]
Martha Nichols
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 2011
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 45-3264620

LAST UPDATED: 11/26/2017
Organization DBA Talking Writing, TW, Talking Writing, Inc.
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

Talking Writing Inc. supports writers and the literary community, primarily through the publication of Talking Writing, a digital literary site that is free to all. Great writing makes us want to sing or shout or argue, and TW’s innovative format opens virtual doors to readers and writers everywhere. The magazine features essays, first-person journalism, visual art, poetry, and interviews with well-known authors. TW's themed issues take on provocative topics such as "Writing and Faith" and "Truth-telling." As the publishing industry continues to transform itself online, Talking Writing exemplifies the impact luminous stories and well-executed journalism can have in the new media world. It's also an educational resource for creative writing and journalism teachers, providing material that complements and adds value to writing curricula.

Mission Statement

Talking Writing Inc. supports writers and the literary community, primarily through the publication of Talking Writing, a digital literary site that is free to all. Great writing makes us want to sing or shout or argue, and TW’s innovative format opens virtual doors to readers and writers everywhere. The magazine features essays, first-person journalism, visual art, poetry, and interviews with well-known authors. TW's themed issues take on provocative topics such as "Writing and Faith" and "Truth-telling." As the publishing industry continues to transform itself online, Talking Writing exemplifies the impact luminous stories and well-executed journalism can have in the new media world. It's also an educational resource for creative writing and journalism teachers, providing material that complements and adds value to writing curricula.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $16,000.00
Projected Expense $15,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Annual Writing Contest
  • AWP Conference
  • Talking Writing Magazine

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Talking Writing Inc. supports writers and the literary community, primarily through the publication of Talking Writing, a digital literary site that is free to all. Great writing makes us want to sing or shout or argue, and TW’s innovative format opens virtual doors to readers and writers everywhere. The magazine features essays, first-person journalism, visual art, poetry, and interviews with well-known authors. TW's themed issues take on provocative topics such as "Writing and Faith" and "Truth-telling." As the publishing industry continues to transform itself online, Talking Writing exemplifies the impact luminous stories and well-executed journalism can have in the new media world. It's also an educational resource for creative writing and journalism teachers, providing material that complements and adds value to writing curricula.

Background Statement

Talking Writing founders Martha Nichols and Elizabeth Langosy met at a Harvard University writing workshop in 1991. By then, they’d each been writing creatively and editing professionally for many years.

In July 2009, Martha started a group blog called Talking Writing after realizing that some students in her Magazine Writing course at the Harvard Extension School used her course site to engage in conversations about writing and life rather than just for routine questions about homework. The original contributors to the blog were and are wonderful writers. Yet, Martha found that she was editing many of the guest posts and that the blog format didn’t establish a masthead for regular contributors to rally around.

She and Elizabeth talked about recrafting the blog as an online literary magazine that was much like a writers group, with a wide-open door and no membership fee. They wanted to publish outstanding stories, poems, and essays that spoke to the craft of writing and to the everyday lives of readers and writers. At the heart of it all was a shared desire to provide a home for the honest, impassioned dialogue about writing that they had found indispensable over the years.

Talking Writing launched as an online magazine in September 2010. In its first year, with Martha as editor in chief and Elizabeth as executive editor, it gained thousands of new readers. The magazine continues to grow, and in the fall of 2011, Martha and Elizabeth registered Talking Writing, Inc., as a nonprofit in the state of Massachusetts. It is now a 501(3)c nonprofit literary organization and now generates more than a quarter of a million page views annually. Elizabeth has now retired as an editor-at-large, but Martha continues to run the magazine and nonprofit organization.


Impact Statement

Talking Writing works to increase the visibility and respectability of digital literary magazines by taking an approach to electronic publishing that is more commonly seen in print magazines. We’re committed to the editing process and work directly with writers to ensure the quality of published pieces. And we support writers by welcoming those at all stages of their writing careers and from diverse backgrounds, trying to break through the elite barriers that still exist in the mainstream publishing world and literary community. 

Talking Writing is also a home for first-person journalism—features told from a personal perspective but underpinned by research and reporting—and other hybrid writing genres like flash essays and memoir. We believe hybrid work, especially nonfiction that combines literary style with journalistic craft, helps promote a diversity of perspectives and the nuanced discussion so often missing in other public forums.

Over close to decade, TW has published interviews with Jennifer Egan, Robert Olen Butler, Gene Luen Yang, William Least Heat-Moon, Caitlin Moran, Chana Bloch, and Terry Tempest Williams. Talking Writing includes a thriving poetry section with work by Alicia Ostriker, Katharine Harer, Randall Horton, and many other contemporary poets. TW opinion pieces have sparked provocative debate and been excerpted in Salon, Ebony, the Huffington Post, and the International Examiner.

Talking Writing panels at recent AWP conferences have taken on topics such as "Literary Politics: White Guys and Everyone Else" (2014), "Digital Poets and Nature" (2015), "The Politics of Empathy" (2015), "The New Nonfiction" (2016), and "What Journalists Can Teach Literary Writers" (2017).

Readers, writers, and donors have shown us that they value our approach. Our readership has risen steadily since we founded Talking Writing in September 2010. Within three months,we were garnering 6,000 monthly views. By late 2013, that had risen to nearly 25,000 page views per month. We have thousands of email subscribers, Twitter followers, and Facebook fans. 

Our ongoing goal is to raise the necessary funds to continue our three primary activities: publishing and promoting Talking Writing; organizing an annual contest to identify and encourage writers; and participating in the yearly AWP conference.  


Needs Statement

Talking Writing began as a dream of creating an online literary community open to all. The result, Talking Writing magazine, has evolved into a more-than-full-time job for co-founder Martha Nichols, kept alive by personal donations of time and funds and the enthusiastic efforts of a volunteer staff of editors and writers. We've been deeply rewarded by the response to our endeavor, but to keep going, we must raise funds for general operating costs and to expand Talking Writing Inc. beyond its current limits. In order to grow, it's now clear we need to cover modest salaries for an executive director—to take over fund-raising and build the board—and an executive editor. Our current annual budget barely ensures technical, production, and administrative support; financing our writing contest; and participation in an annual conference for writers.

Because Martha donates her time as editor in chief, our board has set TW's annual budgets in the past few years at between $18,000 and $20,000. But this will not accommodate salaries for an executive director or an executive editor, for which we'll need an annual budget that ranges from $50,000 to $100,000.
 
In addition, we've been planning to launch a series of TW print books, the first of which will be an anthology of personal essays about mental illness. We'll need to raise $5,000 to $10,000 to publish and market our first print book.

CEO Statement

From Martha Nichols, Editor in Chief:  Talking Writing is the magazine I've always wanted to read. It's a wonderful mix of journalism, personal essays, poetry, and media debate by writers with fresh voices and points of view. Considering how divisive public debate has now become—and the role digital media has played in unraveling civic discourse—TW's mission feels more relevant than ever. Our goal is to show why writing matters in the digital age—and why good reporting and storytelling can change the world. There's too much noise, fakery, and corporate sponsorship in the current digital landscape. More than that, great essays model how to think and talk about ideas, rather than tearing apart anyone who disagrees—a skill we all need to encourage and practice.

Board Chair Statement

From Mark Allen, President and Treasurer:  As president of TW’s board, I can testify to the difference every donation makes. Talking Writing magazine is thriving. Our eighth year of publication will open with a mini-issue on “Writing and Faith”—a now popular holiday tradition that will include the winner and finalists of our latest "Writing and Faith" essay contest. I’m also excited about our new project: Talking Writing Books. The goal is to launch a publishing imprint that can really highlight the wonderful writing collected on our digital site. The first Talking Writing book—tentatively titled Into Sanity—is a collection of personal essays about mental illness. Many of those selected were entries to TW’s 2016 spring essay contest. Contest judge Mark Vonnegut was very impressed by the quality and unusual power of these essays, and so were we.


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL
Talking Writing Inc. is based in Cambridge, MA, but its reach is international. Its primary activity, Talking Writing literary magazine, is online and available for free to readers and writers around the world. Talking Writing has published the work of both prominent and emerging writers from every region of the US and many other countries. The magazine welcomes online discussion of all published pieces, resulting in a lively international dialog on writing issues and literary culture.

Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Printing, Publishing
  2. Education - Adult Education
  3. Religion- Related - Religious Media & Communications

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Annual Writing Contest

Since 2012, TW has held one or two writing contests annually, awarding the Talking Writing Prize for different genres (such as personal essay, hybrid poetry, flash nonfiction, or advice writing). The goals of the annual contests are to celebrate the diversity online of original, personally driven writing and to acknowledge and support writers from all backgrounds and at all stages of their careers.
Budget  --
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Journalism
Population Served Adults Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success  The most immediate benefit of TW's annual contests, five years on, has to do with an overall improvement in the quality of submissions to the magazine. Many of our guests judges—Mark Vonnegut for personal essays about mental illness; Amy King (affiliated with the feminist organization VIDA) for hybrid poetry; and Ausma Zehanat Khan for our recent "Writing and Faith" contest—all attract writers from diverse backgrounds, writing about diverse experiences. 
Program Long-Term Success  TW will continue our contest program, but we'd like to increase the prize money awarded to winners—from $500 to $1,000—in order to encourage more entries. Because our contest program has been active for six years, we generally attract terrific guest judges who do the work on a pro bono basis. However, if we had more funds, we could also pay honorariums of at least $1,000 to guest judges, which would allow us to tap very well-known authors, especially those who are writers of color (as it is, Ursula K. LeGuin almost agreed to judge one of our contests). This, in turn, would help us continue to attract more diverse writers and points of view.
Program Success Monitored By  The success of the contest is measured by the number of entrants for each one, which has risen steadily since our first contests in 2012. Our most recent personal essay contest—for "Writing and Faith"—garnered 70 entries. Our 2015 contest for Hybrid Poetry brought in more than a hundred entries.
Examples of Program Success  In 2016, for the fifth year since its founding, Talking Writing announced two annual writing contests, offering prizes for personal essays about mental illness (Spring 2016) and for flash fiction of the absurd (Fall 2016). Eighty-eight personal essay submissions and sixty-seven flash fiction submissions were received. Entrants paid a $15 fee for each submission. These funds defrayed the costs of contest advertising and administration. The Talking Writing Prize for Personal Essays, judged by Mark Vonnegut, was awarded to Jane McCafferty for "Unleashed." The Talking Writing Prize for Flash Fiction, judged by Meg Pokrass, was awarded to Nyanka Joseph for "To Be a Snake in Winter." Both prizewinners received publication of the winning work in Talking Writing and a $500 award.

AWP Conference

The annual conference of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) is the largest literary event in North America. TW has participated in AWP's Bookfair since 2013, and for the past four years we've presented panel sessions and held other literary events at the conference.
Budget  --
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Journalism
Population Served Adults Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success  AWP generally accepts only 30 or 40 percent of the panel proposals received each year. Despite the highly competitive process, TW has had several panels accepted for each of the past four years. Talking Writing panels at recent AWP conferences have included "Literary Politics: White Guys and Everyone Else" (2014), "Digital Poets and Nature" (2015), "The Politics of Empathy" (2015), "The New Nonfiction" (2016), and "What Journalists Can Teach Literary Writers" (2017).
Program Long-Term Success  Talking Writing Inc. will continue to participate in AWP Conferences, but our long-term goal is to attend and present at other writing conferences around the country. 
Program Success Monitored By  We monitor success at AWP by the number of new subscribers who sign up at our Bookfair booth and by attendance at TW panels and offsite events. By that measure, we see increased interest and attendance at our events every year.
Examples of Program Success  At the 2016 AWP Conference in Los Angeles, held March 30-April 2, Talking Writing was represented by Editor-in-Chief Martha Nichols, Managing Editor Jennifer Jean, Poetry Editor Carol Dorf, and other TW volunteers. We organized and staffed two well-attended panel presentations at this conference: "The New Nonfiction" (standing room only) and "Wild Equations: Math Poetry." TW staff live-tweeted several events each day of the conference in order to distribute information about it via social media to readers and writers around the world. More than 200 submissions flyers and promotional bookmarks were distributed to writers, directors of writing programs, and small press editors. Talking Writing also co-hosted a very well attended offsite reception with Juked magazine, Solstice Literary Magazine, and the Santa Monica Review.

Talking Writing Magazine

Talking Writing, a free digital literary magazine, is the primary activity of Talking Writing Inc. For the past seven years, TW has published two or more issues a year. During an issue cycle, TW publishes new pieces every week, including personal essays, opinion pieces, fiction, poetry, author interviews, regular columns, and work by visual artists. In 2017, the spring issue included TW's poetry spotlight (on the theme of "Borders"); the fall issue is nonfiction-focused (on the theme of "Truth-telling").

Budget  $10,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Journalism
Population Served Adults Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

The Winter 2016 issue of TW, titled "Teaching Life," offered essays about balancing teaching and writing. The Spring 2016 issue, "Wild Equations," featured a spotlight on math poetry. The Fall 2016 issue, "Open Letters" featured a series of essays in the form of open letters to celebrities and famous authors. The Holiday 2016 issue, "Writing and Faith," offered personal essays and poems about the ways faith helps writers create meaning out of life's big questions. Talking Writing has maintained its readership for the past two years, with a total page-view count of more than a quarter-million annually. The magazine made modest gains in email and RSS subscribers, Twitter followers, and Facebook fans. It also began posting on Instagram, growing followership on a new platform.

Program Long-Term Success  Long-term, we'd like to see TW writers receive more social-media attention and for the overall site to generate up to 10,000 unique users a month. But more than that, we want to use Talking Writing as a platform for launching print books directed at audiences beyond the literary community—such as our planned print anthology of personal essays about mental illness or another anthology that collects our many essays about writing and faith. Last but not least, TW's editor has always wanted to set up writing programs in senior centers and hospices, connecting writing practice and therapy with Big Questions about mortality, belief, and the meaning life.
Program Success Monitored By  We track readership for different issues and the site as a whole through digital traffic stats. TW's social-media manager generates a summary of readership numbers for different pieces and genres for each issue.
Examples of Program Success  TW has published interviews with Jennifer Egan, Robert Olen Butler, Gene Luen Yang, William Least Heat-Moon, Caitlin Moran, Chana Bloch, and Terry Tempest Williams. Talking Writing includes a thriving poetry section with work by Alicia Ostriker, Katharine Harer, Randall Horton, and many other contemporary poets. TW opinion pieces have sparked provocative debate and been excerpted in Salon, Ebony, the Huffington Post, and the International Examiner.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

From Martha Nichols, Editor in Chief: In 2018, we are devoting part of the annual budget usually devoted to staffing the AWP Conference to launching our first print book. This year, the TW Board set that as a priority, and once we've published the first title from Talking Writing Books—an anthology of personal essays about mental illness—this will constitute an important new program for our organization. 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Martha Nichols
CEO Term Start Jan 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Martha Nichols is a longtime journalist and freelance writer. Her work has appeared in many publications, including Utne Reader; Brain, Child; Salon; and the Christian Science Monitor. A former editor at Harvard Business Review, she's currently a contributing editor at Women's Review of Books and teaches in the journalism program at the Harvard University Extension School. As a reporter for Youth Today, she covered nonprofit workforce issues in community-based organizations. Martha has served on several boards, including that of the Tenderloin Reflection and Education Center (TREC) in San Francisco in the late 1980s. TREC is a nonprofit community organization that promotes arts and culture in an inner-city neighborhood. Martha’s experience as an instructor and facilitator with a TREC women’s writing group is documented in Caroline Heller’s Until We Are Strong Together: Women Writers in the Tenderloin (Teacher’s College Press, 1997). More recently, Martha was clerk on the executive committee of the board for Harvard’s Botanic Gardens Children’s Center.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Alyson Conover Bookkeeper --
Carol Dorf Poetry Editor --
Jennifer Jean Managing Editor Jennifer is a published poet and writing instructor. She manages the administration of Talking Writing Inc. (contracts, email correspondence, submissions) and runs the spring poetry issue. She is also our main staff "anchor" at TW's booth at the AWP Conference.
Topher Levin Social-Media Manager --
John Vogel Production Editor --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

From Martha Nichols, Editor in Chief: In many ways, TW is a virtual organization with a digital product, so risk management involves protection of intellectual property rather than insurance of a physical building or workplace. Still, many of the items "under development" on the list, especially fund-raising, are clear priorities, and in 2018, much of our attention will be focused on strengthening our management structure, strategic plan, and the TW board. We need funding for capacity building in order to grow the organization and ensure its future. 

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 19
Number of Contract Staff 5
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 19
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 16
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration No

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A

Governance


Board Chair Dr. Mark Allen
Board Chair Company Affiliation Physical Sciences Inc., executive vice president
Board Chair Term Sept 2014 - Sept 2020
Board Co-Chair Ms. Bianca Garcia
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Runkeeper (ASICS), director of media
Board Co-Chair Term Sept 2011 - Sept 2020

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mark Allen Physical Sciences Inc., executive vice president Voting
Michael Baldwin Retired Voting
Bianca Garcia Clerk Voting
Martha Nichols TW, Editor In Chief Exofficio

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

From Martha Nichols, Editor in Chief: Board developments a priority for Talking Writing Inc. In 2017, several board members came to the end of their terms and have retired. 

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $16,000.00
Projected Expense $15,000.00
Form 990s

2016 2016 990EZ

2015 2015 990N

2014 2014 990EZ

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $15,980 $11,551 $18,582
Total Expenses $15,170 $10,233 $15,454

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $13,649 $9,631 $15,984
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $2,193 $1,920 $1,465
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $138 -- $1,133

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $15,170 $10,233 $15,454
Administration Expense -- -- --
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.05 1.13 1.20
Program Expense/Total Expenses 100% 100% 100%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $810 $1,317 $7,108
Current Assets $810 $1,317 $7,108
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities -- -- --
Total Net Assets $810 $1,317 $7,108

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990-EZs for FY16 and FY14 and per the organization's records for FY15. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

--

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--