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Camp Shriver--An Inclusive Summer Program for Children with and without Disabilities

 Center for Social Development and Education at UMass Boston, 100 Morrissey Boulevard
 Boston, MA 02125
[P] (617) 2877250
[F] (617) 287-7249
www.csde.umb.edu/shriver
[email protected]
-- --
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INCORPORATED: 2006
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-6013152

LAST UPDATED: 09/22/2014
Organization DBA Center for Social Development and Education, University of Massachusetts Boston
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Camp Shriver’s mission is to bring children with and without disabilities together to provide opportunities for social and motor development, while promoting positive peer relationships among campers.

 
Camp Shriver believes that all children should have the opportunity to play and learn--as equals.
 
 
 

Mission Statement

Camp Shriver’s mission is to bring children with and without disabilities together to provide opportunities for social and motor development, while promoting positive peer relationships among campers.

 
Camp Shriver believes that all children should have the opportunity to play and learn--as equals.
 
 
 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $227,515.00
Projected Expense $237,515.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Camp Shriver - A Free Inclusive Summer Program for Children with and without Disabilities

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Camp Shriver’s mission is to bring children with and without disabilities together to provide opportunities for social and motor development, while promoting positive peer relationships among campers.

 
Camp Shriver believes that all children should have the opportunity to play and learn--as equals.
 
 
 

Background Statement

The Center for Social Development and Education (CSDE) is the multidisciplinary research institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston that hosts Camp Shriver. CSDE was established at UMass Boston in 1976 by Gary Siperstein, Ph.D., internationally known for his research and program development in the field of disabilities. For over 30 years, CSDE’s goal has been to enhance the overall quality of life of children who are at risk for adverse outcomes due to environmental, behavioral, or genetic factors.

CSDE’s organizational goals can be grouped into three categories: research, professional development and service. The Center places an organizational priority on the publication and dissemination of research, focusing on factors that contribute to the quality of life of children with disabilities in the home, school and community. Recent accomplishments include an ongoing evaluation of Project UNIFY, a school-based program funded by the US DOE which aims to foster respect, dignity, and advocacy among children for their peers with disabilities and the global expansion of Young Athletes, a program designed to promote motor and social development in young children with developmental disabilities through physical activity and play.

The Center’s professional development accomplishments include the delivery and management of a national award-winning, 15 credit graduate certificate program in Adaptive Behavior Analysis, preparing educators to meet the learning and behavioral needs of children with emotional and behavioral challenges. CSDE's service offerings include in-service training to educators and non-profit organizations, conferences on recreational inclusion, parent workshops, and hosting Camp Shriver.

In 2006, CSDE was honored when the late Mrs. Eunice Kennedy Shriver invited the Center to host one of five national pilot sites for Camp Shriver in celebration of her 85th birthday. CSDE will continue to honor Mrs. Shriver’s legacy in 2013 with the 8th annual Camp Shriver.

As a result of the many accomplishments of its multidisciplinary staff, the Center is recognized locally, nationally, and internationally as an institute that addresses the social aspects of education. CSDE is recognized especially for its success in creating a nexus between research and practice, the development of evidence-based instructional curricula and professional development programs, and the unique value the CSDE places on the social development of children and adolescents.

 
 
 

Impact Statement

FY12 Top Five Accomplishments

1) Hosting Camp Shriver for the 8th annual summer, having served over 800 children since its inception in 2006, 50% with and 50% without disabilities, from Boston, Brockton and Quincy. Enrollment per summer: 100-120 campers.

2) Screening 188,000 families nationally to document the prevalence of children with intellectual disabilities and Autism and constructing a panel of 1,000 of these families to examine the pathways to employment and access to health care.

3) Launching the Young Athlete (YA) program, a motor development program for young children with developmental delays in developing countries, including Namibia, Thailand, and Romania

4) Administering the national award-winning Applied Behavior Analysis Certificate (ABA) program in partnership with University College. Enrollment: 42 students.

5) Successfully disseminating research through articles and/or chapters in: Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology and Disability, Journal for National Association of State Boards of Education, Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, Journal of Behavioral Disorders, and Journal of Intellectual Disability Research.

 

FY14 Top Five Goals

1) Host the 9th Camp Shriver for 120 campers, 50% with and 50% without disabilities, from Boston and Quincy.

2) Disseminate research conclusions on the evaluation of pathways to employment and access to health care from the panel of 1,000 families with children with intellectual disabilities and Autism from a national sample of over 188,000 families.

3) Evaluate the first year of YA programming, a motor development program for young children with developmental delays, in developing countries including Namibia, Thailand, and Romania.

4) Administer the national award-winning Applied Behavior Analysis Certificate (ABA) at UMass Boston and expand the program to two universities in Kenya.

5) Continue to disseminate the knowledge gained through research and practice initiatives in the fields of special education and developmental psychology.

 
 

Needs Statement

At capacity, Camp Shriver can serve 120 campers; each year Camp Shriver’s most pressing need is to raise the funds necessary to successfully serve the greatest amount of children each year at no cost to their families.

While other recreational programs may accept children with disabilities, few, if any, are designed to enroll an equal number of children with and without disabilities. Additionally, many camps for children in the Greater Boston area are prohibitively expensive.

Camp Shriver is unique as a free inclusive sports camp and its extensive waiting list—over 250 applications—demonstrates the great need Camp Shriver meets in the community.

Based on its commitment to maintain high quality programming and a safe environment for its campers, Camp Shriver faced a difficult decision in 2012-2013. Several funders, all of whom expressed unequivocal encouragement and support for Camp Shriver, reduced their gift size, due to limitations on available grant funding. This 20% reduction in funding reduced the number of campers Camp Shriver could safely serve from 120 to 104.

This year, Camp Shriver is actively seeking ways to increase its funding through foundation grants, corporate sponsorship and individual giving so that Camp Shriver can serve at capacity—120 campers—in 2014.

 
 
 

CEO Statement

Unique Benefits of an Inclusive Recreational Camp

Camp Shriver at UMass Boston was established to impact the attitudes and social prejudices of children with and without disabilities, so that all children can play and learn—as equals.

The beneficial impact of an inclusive recreational camp is equally shared by children with and without disabilities. For campers without disabilities, inclusive camps provide the opportunity to develop an appreciation of what it means to have a disability and increase acceptance of peers with disabilities (Brannan et al., 2000). This is more important than ever before: a study of Boston-area children (Siperstein, Leffert, & Glick, 2007) found that children with disabilities were three times more likely to be rejected by their classmates than their peers without disabilities. In fact, a comprehensive national survey conducted in the U.S. showed that non-disabled youth are unwilling to socially interact with their disabled peers outside of school (Siperstein, Parker, Norins, & Widaman, 2007).

At an inclusive camp, while children without disabilities learn to accept their peers, children with disabilities learn social skills and behaviors so that they too can build and sustain friendships. Numerous studies have demonstrated that inclusive camps improve the social participation and even self-esteem of children with disabilities (Marsh, 1999; Brannan, Arick, Fullerton, & Harris, 2000). In fact, through participation in integrated activities such as inclusive sport instruction with children without disabilities, inclusive camps can enhance the social skills, independence, resourcefulness of children with disabilities (Brannan et al., 2000).

An inclusive summer recreational setting like Camp Shriver can help reverse the stigma associated with disability that results in social rejection. As communities become more diverse in terms of ethnicity, gender, race, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, education, physical and mental abilities, religious and ideological beliefs and more, it is important that all children, with or without disabilities, learn to accept their peers, to find similarities instead of difference in their acquaintances, and to build relationships with others they might consider to be different.

The lasting benefit of Camp Shriver is what children take with them into the school year when they leave: improved social skills, changed attitudes and a new acceptance of those who are different.

 
 
 

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

In 2014, Camp Shriver will welcome over 100 campers 50% with and 50% without disabilities from Boston (80%) and Quincy (20%). The majority of campers live in neighborhoods surrounding UMass Boston, including Dorchester, Roxbury, Hyde Park, Jamaica Plain, Mattapan, Roslindale and South Boston. Camper ethnicity is representative of their communities: for example, in 2012, 55% were Black/African American, 24% White, 14% Hispanic/Latino and 6% Asian; 76% were low-to-moderate income as defined by the FFIEC.

 
 
 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  2. Human Services - Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers
  3. Recreation & Sports - Camps

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Camp Shriver - A Free Inclusive Summer Program for Children with and without Disabilities

Camp Shriver is a no-cost, fully inclusive sports camp where 100 children, ages 8-12, 50% with and 50% without disabilities learn and play—as equals.

Camp Shriver’s mission is to use sports as a vehicle to bring children with and without disabilities together so that they have the opportunity to develop their motor and social skills, create positive peer relationships and make new friends.

Camp Shriver creates an inclusive recreational environment by implementing 1) a supportive team model with a 4:1 camper-to-staff ratio and a balance of ages, genders and campers with and without disabilities and 2) inclusive sport instruction in swimming, soccer, basketball and more by coaches who have graduate degrees in adaptive physical education.

Additionally, Camp Shriver offers free transportation, as many parents work or are unable to provide/afford transportation; and free nutritious breakfast and lunch, which help families bridge the summer gap in school-provided meal services.

 
 
 
Budget  $237,515.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Individuals with Disabilities
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) People/Families with of People with Disabilities Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

1) Camp Shriver’s team model will establish a supportive environment that allows campers develop positive peer relationships and friendships.

In 2012, 88% of campers named a friend at camp and 70% of campers without a disability named a camper with a disability as a friend. In fact, over 50% of the friendships at camp were between children with and without disabilities.

 

2) Camp Shriver will develop positive social behavior and social skills.

For example, in 2012, counselors identified 10% of the camp population in greatest need of improving social skills and 100% of these campers demonstrated improvement by the conclusion of camp.

 

3) Camp Shriver will provide opportunities for campers to develop their motor skills.

Campers will receive 50 hours of inclusive instructional time. In swimming in 2012, for example, 26% of beginners moved up to the intermediate level and 88% of campers believed they were good, or even great, at swimming.

 
 
 
Program Long-Term Success 

Camp Shriver envisions a world where children with intellectual and developmental disabilities are naturally integrated into all parts of life—especially outside the classroom in social groups and recreational activities.

To achieve this, Camp Shriver brings together children with and without disabilities to influence the attitudes of both.  For children without disabilities, Camp Shriver promotes an understanding of what it is like to have a disability and helps campers develop tolerance and acceptance for all those who are different.

For with children with disabilities, Camp Shriver works to develop positive social behaviors and social skills so that they are ready and able to enter into friendships and positive social relationships with their peers.

By building friendships between children with and without disabilities, Camp Shriver hopes to achieve a truly inclusive and equal society for all.

 
 
 
Program Success Monitored By 

Camp Shriver conducts a rigorous program evaluation each year to ensure that the Camp excels at providing an inclusive summer recreational camp which creates opportunities for its campers to develop their motor and social skills, promote positive peer relationships, and create new friendships.

The evaluation is conducted by research staff from the Center for Social Development and Education at UMass Boston. Assessment instruments and methods are drawn from scientific literature and adapted to measure campers’ social relationships through individual camper interviews and structured camper observation. Counselors and coaches, who directly interact with campers every day, are surveyed to assess campers’ social skills and sports skills.

This information allows Camp Shriver to continuously revise and improve its positive effects on campers. Camp Shriver’s documented successes have been published in scientific journals, psychology magazines, camping magazines and on NPR.

 
 
 
Examples of Program Success 

Aaron was a Camp Shriver camper with an intellectual disability that made it difficult for him to understand how to become part of a group. He would steal a baseball from a group of campers, but would yell and run away if invited to play.

Aaron lacked an understanding of basic social cues and the language to express his desire to join a group, so the staff developed a plan. Aaron was given his own container of three tennis balls, on the condition that if another camper wanted to play, he would have to share.

For most of the week, Aaron happily played off-the-wall alone. But then, another camper approached him and asked to play. The staff held their breath.

Aaron hesitated for a minute, but then shared one of the balls with Will. Soon, playing next to each other became playing with each other and Aaron made a friend. 

At Camp Shriver, Aaron had the support he needed to develop and practice social skills and build friendships, skills he will take into the school year and beyond.
 
 
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Camp Shriver – Expanded Program Model Description

To ensure that all children have an opportunity to play and learn as equals, and to create an environment that promotes tolerance and positive social development, Camp Shriver implements 1) a supportive team model with a 4:1 camper-to-staff ratio, and an equal balance of ages, genders and disability status and 2) inclusive sport instruction in swimming, soccer, basketball and more.

  1. Supportive Team Model. To emphasize and foster the equal status of all campers, Camp Shriver’s team model has extensive counselor support with a 4:1 camper-to-staff ratio, and deliberately oversamples children with disabilities—19% of children in the Boston Public School system have a disability, while 50% of children at Camp Shriver and on each team have a disability. With a 50:50 ratio, it becomes less clear who has a disability and who does not, increasing the identification of all campers as equal and reducing the likelihood that any one child will be singled out as “disabled.”
  2. Inclusive Sport Instruction. To encourage all campers to develop their motor skills and engage children with and without disabilities in integrated activities, Camp Shriver coaches, who are elite athletes with degrees in adaptive physical education, lead campers through an inclusive sport curriculum specifically adapted for the needs of children with disabilities.  Instruction is focused on the Pyramid of Motor Development (Clark, 2005) and includes fundamental motor skills and context-specific motor skills, where the fundamental motor skills are embedded within game-type settings and rule-driven games. Campers rotate between the soccer field, gym and pool, for a total of 50 hours of instructional time.
Additionally, Camp Shriver offers free and reliable transportation, as many parents work or are unable to provide/afford transportation on their own; and nutritious breakfast and lunch, to encourage campers to eat healthy and be ready for physical activity all day. For families, these community meals often bridge the summer gap between school- and state-provided meal services.
 
Finally, Camp Shriver hosts visits from organizations that promote music, art, dance and additional team sports—such as lacrosse—to expose campers to the many opportunities that their own community offers.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Gary N. Siperstein
CEO Term Start Sept 1974
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Gary N. Siperstein, PhD.

Director, Center for Social Development and Education

Professor, John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies

 

Dr. Gary Siperstein is the Founder and Director of the Center for Social Development and Education at the University of Massachusetts Boston. A professor at UMass Boston since 1974, Dr. Siperstein received his Ph.D. at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University. He has published more than 100 articles, chapters, and books on the social relationships and social development of children with disabilities. His most recent book, Promoting Social Success, focuses on improving the social competence and cognitive development of children in the classroom. He has served as editor for a variety of scientific journals. The recipient of numerous research grants including the NICHD (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) and the U.S. Department of Education, Dr. Siperstein received the prestigious MERIT Award from NICHD for his work on the social aspects of intellectual disability. Enhancing the social competence of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities in inclusive educational and recreational settings has been the focus of his most recent projects. Under Dr. Siperstein's direction, CSDE also works collaboratively with Special Olympics Inc. as a Global Collaborating Center (GCC). The purpose of the GCC is to conduct rigorous scientific research that is of value to the international community. The UMass Boston/Special Olympics Global Collaborating Center is solely responsible for all international research related to attitudes and intellectual disabilities. 

As a personal advisor to that late Mrs. Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Dr. Siperstein was one of five asked to host a national pilot site for Camp Shriver, in celebration of her 85th birthday. The CSDE and Dr. Siperstein will continue to honor Mrs. Shriver’s legacy in 2013 with the 8th annual Camp Shriver.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Barbara Gildea Assistant Director, Community Programs

As the Assistant Director of Community Programs, Barbara Gildea leads development and communications for the Center for Social Development and Education. In her role as program coordinator for Camp Shriver at UMass Boston, Ms. Gildea is responsible for corporate, foundation, individual and event giving; camper recruitment and admission; staff management; and liaising with Camp Shriver's partners at the University, local schools and greater UMass Boston community.

Prior to joining CSDE, Ms. Gildea has worked in a variety of communication and development positions in non-profit settings, including Teachers College at Columbia University, Citizen Schools New York and Roca, a youth development organization based in Chelsea. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English, a Bachelor of Arts in Latin and Greek, and a Bachelor of Science in Secondary English Education from Boston University and a Masters of Arts in the Humanities from the University of Chicago.

Mr. Mark Spolidoro Director, Camp Shriver

Mark Spolidoro has been an Adapted Physical Education Teacher for twenty years with the Boston Public Schools while also filling the role of the coordinator for Special Olympics Massachusetts/Unified Sports for the past twelve. He graduated as a Bachelor of Science in Physical Education and Health from the University of Rhode Island and continued his education at UMass Boston, receiving a teacher’s certification in Moderate Special Needs Education. Mark was an all-state athlete in Baseball in Rhode Island and played Baseball at the University of Rhode Island. He is still involved in sports as a youth football, basketball and baseball coach. Mark remains physically active by participating in adult basketball and softball leagues while enjoying playing golf with family and friends.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Center for Social Development and Education is in compliance with all management policy and procedures of the University of Massachusetts Boston and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.  
 
Please contact the Center for Social Development and Education for further information about there management policies. 

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 11
Number of Part Time Staff 28
Number of Volunteers 12
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 18
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): The numbers above and below are reflective of Camp Shriver staff specifically.
Gender Female: 14
Male: 14
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? N/A
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Robert L. Caret
Board Chair Company Affiliation President, University of Massachusetts
Board Chair Term Jan 2011 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Richard V. Aghababian M.D. Associate Dean of Continuing Medical Education, University of Massachusetts Medical School (retired) Voting
Mark Atkins Chairman, President & CEO, Invention Machine Corporation Voting
Douglas Cliggott Economics Faculty, University of Massachusetts Amherst Voting
Stephen A. Collins Independent Financial Consultant Voting
Michael F. Collins, M.D. M.D. Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Medical School Exofficio
Edward H. D'Alelio Chair, UMF Investment Committee; Independent Financial Consultant Voting
Joseph C. Day Chairman & CEO, Freudenberg-NOK (retired) Voting
Matthew C. Donahue Esq. Partner, Eno Martin Donahue, LLP; UMass Lowell Alumnus Exofficio
Stephen R. Dunne Regional Office Manager for New England, Credit Suisse Voting
Grace K. Fey President, Grace K. Fey Advisors Voting
Patricia C. Flaherty Senior Vice President, Putnam Investments (retired); UMass Boston Alumna Exofficio
Stanley L. Fung Owner, Private Equity Firm Voting
Maria D. Furman Managing Director , Standish Ayer & Wood (retired) Voting
Divinia Grossman Ph.D. Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Exofficio
Warren Isabelle Principal and Chief Investment Officer, Ironwood Investment Management, LLC Voting
James R. Julian, Jr. Jr. Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, University of Massachusetts Exofficio
John D. Kattar Chief Investment Officer, Eastern Investment Advisors Voting
Mark A. Marinella Independent Financial Consultant Voting
Martin T. Meehan J.D. Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Lowell Exofficio
J. Keith Motley Ph.D. Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Boston Exofficio
James P. Pappas Chair, UMF Governance & Audit Committee; Managing Director, Putnam Investments Voting
R. Norm Peters Esq. Principal, Peters & Sowyrda Voting
Mary L. Reed President Ex Officio, Bessie Tartt Wilson Initiative for Children, Inc. Voting
Robert R. Reitano Professor of Finance, Brandeis University Voting
Andrew T. Rudd Chairman & CEO, Advisor Software, Inc. Voting
Robert K. Sheridan President & CEO, SBLI (retired) Voting
Kumble Subbaswamy, Ph.D. Subbaswamy Ph.D. Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Amherst Exofficio
Henry M. Thomas III President & Chair, University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees: President, Urban Leagure of Springfield Exofficio
Karl E. White Managing Principal, Gracian & Co., LLC. Voting
Christine Wilda Senior Vice President for Administration & Finance and Treasurer, University of Massachusetts Exofficio
Roy J. Zuckerberg Chairman, Samson Capital Advisors, LLC Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Gina Capello Vice-Chancellor for University Advancement, UMass Boston NonVoting
Mr. Patrick Day Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, UMass Boston NonVoting
Ms. Patricia Halon Director of General Medicine, Health Services, UMass Boston NonVoting
Ms. Gail Hobin Director of Community Relations, UMass Boston NonVoting
Mr. Chris Hogan Chief of Staff, UMass Boston NonVoting
Mr. James Overton Director of Public Safety, UMass Boston NonVoting
Dr. Gary Siperstein Director, CSDE, UMass Boston NonVoting
Mr. Mark Spolidoro Director, Camp Shriver NonVoting
Ms. Judith Todd Director of Special Education, Quincy Public Schools NonVoting
Mr. John Verre Asst. Supt. for Special Education & Student Services, Boston Public Schools NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 25
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Other - East Indian
Gender Female: 6
Male: 26
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The University of Massachusetts Boston is one of five UMass campuses served by the University of Massachusetts Foundation, Inc., a private not-for-profit corporation having a 501(c)(3) identification number. The UMass Foundation acts as fiscal agent, receives the grant and oversees the disbursal of funds for Camp Shriver.

Camp Shriver is a program of the Center for Social Development and Education (CSDE), a research institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Neither CSDE nor Camp Shriver is governed by a Board of Directors. 

Therefore, the above is a list of the UMass Foundation Board and the Camp Shriver Advisory and Planning Board.
 

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $227,515.00
Projected Expense $237,515.00
Form 990s

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

Audit Documents

2012 UMF Audited Financials

2011 UMF Audited Financials

2010 UMF Audited Financials

2009 UMF Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Revenue $187,209 $213,437 $187,353
Total Expenses $186,531 $211,480 $185,504

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$120,100 $134,090 $98,598
Government Contributions $8,300 $9,800 $9,605
    Federal $8,300 $9,800 $9,605
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $5,580 $625 $325
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $2,475 $2,900 $2,850
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $19,548 $25,989 $22,349
Other $31,206 $40,033 $53,626

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Program Expense $155,231 $175,980 $154,504
Administration Expense $23,072 $25,989 $22,349
Fundraising Expense $8,228 $9,511 $8,651
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.01 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 83% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 6% 7% 8%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Assets -- -- --
Current Assets -- -- --
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities -- -- --
Total Net Assets -- -- --

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The University of Massachusetts Boston is one of five UMass campuses served by the University of Massachusetts Foundation, Inc., a private not-for-profit corporation having a 501(c)(3) identification number. The UMass Foundation acts as fiscal agent, receives grants and oversees the disbursal of funds for Camp Shriver.

Camp Shriver is a program of the Center for Social Development and Education (CSDE), a research institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston, responsible for raising its budget through foundation, corporate and individual donors. 

 

2012 BUDGET NOTE

Based on its commitment to maintain high quality programming and a safe environment for its campers, Camp Shriver faced a difficult decision in 2012. Several funders, all of whom expressed unequivocal encouragement and support for Camp Shriver, reduced the size of their expected gifts, due to limitations on their available grant funding. Camp Shriver experienced a 20% reduction in anticipated grant funding and as such reduced the number of campers it could safely serve from 120 to 104.

This year, Camp Shriver is actively seeking ways to increase its funding through foundation grants, corporate sponsorship and individual giving so that Camp Shriver can serve at capacity—120 campers—in 2013.

Foundation Comments

The financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per Camp Shriver. The IRS Form 990s and Audited Financials posted above are that of Camp Shriver's fiscal agent, the UMass Foundation. Also, asset and liability data can be found within UMass Foundation's documents posted above, as this data is not specifically available for Camp Shriver.

Per the organization: The University of Massachusetts Boston is one of five UMass campuses served by the University of Massachusetts Foundation, Inc., a private not-for-profit corporation having a 501(c)(3) identification number. The UMass Foundation acts as fiscal agent, receives grants and oversees the disbursal of funds, for Camp Shriver.
 
Camp Shriver is a program of the Center for Social Development and Education (CSDE), a research institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston. 
 

Documents


Other Documents

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Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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