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Organization DBA Apprentice Learning
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Apprentice Learning believes that every young person should be empowered to pursue a fulfilling work life. We leverage career exploration to teach skills and nurture dreams for middle school students. We work with under-resourced 8th grade students in the Boston Public Schools and provide them with hands-on, interactive classroom learning experiences and an internship in an actual work environment. Apprentice Learning helps students to identify individual strengths and interests, to build their self-confidence, to gain career-readiness skills, and to practice good work habits that are critical to their future success

Mission Statement

Apprentice Learning believes that every young person should be empowered to pursue a fulfilling work life. We leverage career exploration to teach skills and nurture dreams for middle school students. We work with under-resourced 8th grade students in the Boston Public Schools and provide them with hands-on, interactive classroom learning experiences and an internship in an actual work environment. Apprentice Learning helps students to identify individual strengths and interests, to build their self-confidence, to gain career-readiness skills, and to practice good work habits that are critical to their future success

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $152,982.00
Projected Expense $141,583.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Apprenticeships
  • Workplace Explorations

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Apprentice Learning believes that every young person should be empowered to pursue a fulfilling work life. We leverage career exploration to teach skills and nurture dreams for middle school students. We work with under-resourced 8th grade students in the Boston Public Schools and provide them with hands-on, interactive classroom learning experiences and an internship in an actual work environment. Apprentice Learning helps students to identify individual strengths and interests, to build their self-confidence, to gain career-readiness skills, and to practice good work habits that are critical to their future success

Background Statement

Apprentice Learning (AL) was founded by Helen Russell, an accomplished educator and administrator who has spent most of her professional life in experiential education. She created AL to introduce students from under-resourced communities to the culture of work and the vast world of career paths that are available to them but that are often out of their reach.

AL is grounded in more than a decade of research that has revealed a pressing need for career education, particularly among low-income urban youth, many of whom have no role models in this area. In 2012, the year of Apprentice Learning’s founding, only 27% of teenagers aged 16-19 were employed in Massachusetts. According to a 2013 Commonwealth Corporation report, that low percentage of non-working youth can be largely attributed to the lack of career education and understanding of the workplace environment. “(Many students) exhibit poor eye contact, don’t ask questions, and often have an unacceptable appearance.” And, if they do get a job, they tend to be unreliable. “Teens are less likely to be on time for work and more likely to be absent when scheduled for work.”

Through Apprentice Learning and by targeting students in middle school, students get early valuable exposure to the world of work and practice the so-called “soft skills” required for success in any work environment including critical thinking, problem solving, communication, self-direction, and teamwork. AL not only helps students build practical skills and self-confidence, but also helps shape their future dreams by exploring personal interests and exposing them to career possibilities they are unlikely to have experienced any other way. 

AL also responds to a growing consensus that academic proficiency alone is not enough to prepare students for success in the 21st century economy. According to the Massachusetts Department of Education website, “the quality of one’s career development can have a significant impact on his/her educational, occupational, and lifestyle choices and outcomes. Too often, student complacency, behavior problems, and dropout rates stem from the perception that schooling has little relevance. The future-mindedness cultivated through career development education (CDE) can play a key role in promoting student motivation and achievement. Therefore, CDE should be integrated with the mainstream curriculum as a means of promoting student success.” 

AL introduces career education in middle school, when students are developmentally ready to consider career paths and often so highly motivated by their desire to work that they are eager to participate. This experience also helps to improve a middle school student’s often difficult transition to high school. by helping students link academic success in high school with success in a career and in life. 


Impact Statement

Apprentice Learning has accomplished much since its founding less than three years ago. In our two partner schools, career education is now a graduation requirement for 8th graders. The number of students we serve has increased from 35 to 140 (and growing). We have secured 35 site partners (i.e., business and organizations where we place apprentices), concentrating on environments where there are a rich variety of rewarding career possibilities, such as WGBH, The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, NorthStar Asset Management, and New England Baptist Hospital to name a few. And, we have achieved all this growth without compromising the central aspect of Apprentice Learning that focuses on each child, one-on-one, to identify their interests and abilities and to individualize their experience.

 For the next academic year (2015-2016), our key goals are to:

·      add at least one more school partner;

·      seek additional site partners, especially companies and organizations that work in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and math), as well as in marketing and financial services;

·      increase the number of students served through summer and school vacation programs, and by introducing our curriculum for use by other educational organizations;

·      strengthen our alumni services·      improve the collection, assessment, and interpretation of evaluation metrics.


Needs Statement

Apprentice Learning is a young, growing and dynamic organization. We are seeking funding to strengthen our overall organizational capacity. Our top needs are:

·         $60,000. Hire an additional full-time staff member to focus on organizational growth activities especially marketing, social networking, outreach to existing and potential partners, and fundraising;

·         $14,000. Supplement the costs of organizational expansion including the addition of another school partner and a summer school partner (specifically the BELL scholars program);

·         $50,000 to support a significant increase in our fundraising efforts. In addition to our current funders, we have created the ambitious goal of raising a minimum of $100,000 from new donors;

·         $0. Add two to four experienced board members;

·         $10,000. Research and develop future site partners, especially in STEM fields, marketing and financial services;

·         $8,000. Refine evaluation metrics through computer software that enables regular, efficient, tracking and through an association with Harvard University’s PEAR, Program in Education, Afterschool, and Resiliency.


CEO Statement

A MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Ninth graders have the lowest grade point average, the most missed classes, the majority of failing grades, and more misbehavior referrals than any other high school grade level. The 9th grade also has the highest enrollment rate in high schools, mainly due to the fact that approximately 22% of students repeat 9th-grade classes. This number can be even higher in large urban high schools.(McCallumore, Kyle Megan; Sparapani, Ervin F., October 2010, Educational Digest)

Exposure to work at a young age is thought to contribute to the focus and direction young people need to make decisions about their future life pathways. Working at an early age generates a set of additional and longer lasting benefits that are manifest in improved lifetime employment and earnings outcomes as well as improved educational attainment outcomes. (Signaling Success: Boosting Teen Employment Prospects, Commonwealth Corporation 2013)

Ninth grade as a critical year. More students fail ninth grade than any other grade in high school. While nationally, nearly one third of all high school students drop out before completing high school, 75% of students who fail one course in ninth grade will drop out of school before graduating.

There is an urgent need to prepare young people before high school and equipping students with a variety of opportunities to motivate them to succeed such as a part-time job, career goals and pathways, and caring adults who can advise and support them outside of school.


Board Chair Statement

A MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD

At a time when education at all levels in this country is facing dramatic challenges—both in terms of curricular content and delivery systems, the success of Apprentice Learning in only two years is powerful testimony to the efficacy of the integration of workplace experience with classroom instruction. This is especially true for urban middle school students for whom the next steps into high school and beyond may seem to hold little or no promise.

Our graduate apprentices are already demonstrating the depth of curiosity and talent that can be awakened through the experience of working beside professionals who both teach and mentor them. In that process, these students not only become better learners in the classroom, but more motivated and active members of their respective communities.

The Board’s goal is to grow this program so that it might eventually be replicated throughout the Boston Public Schools.

We invite your interest and support as educators, site partners, donors and interested citizens.

Jane L. Scarborough

Board Member


Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.

Boston, MA
Students live in Dorchester, Roxbury, Mattapan, Jamaica Plain, Roslindale, South End, and West Roxbury.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Single Organization Support
  2. Employment - Job Training
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Economic Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Apprenticeships

Apprentice Learning’s core program is the Budget 

$160,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

Short term success for Apprentice Learning means that

·       participating students learn and practice workplace skills and understand the basics of professionalism;

·       students gain exposure to adults who are passionate about their work;

·       students broaden the career horizons and aspirations;

·       each student completes a resume that documents his/her skills, interests, and experience;

·       each student understands that dropping out of school has a direct effect on their ability to find rewarding (both financially and spiritually) work in the future.

Program Long-Term Success 

Students who participate in the Apprentice Learning experience become more aware of the vast world of career paths that are available to them. They are not only able to apply for, secure, and keep afterschool and/or summer employment, but they also gain a deep understanding of the connection between school and work. Students with dreams for the future are more likely to stay in school and keep up with their studies.

     Long-term success for Apprentice Learning would also mean that schools across the Boston Public School system include career education as a middle school graduation requirement.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
Apprentice Learning is a young program and impact metrics naturally lag behind program implementation.  However, a few words from our students (collected May 2015) may say it all:
 
“I think Apprentice Learning is very helpful for kids my age because when they get a job in the future they will already have an experience of what it’s like to work in an actual work space.”  Lanea
 
“At Apprentice Learning I learned how to fill out a resume for a job. Also, I learned how to be a patient, gentle, and kind hard worker and a multi-tasker.”  Marvin
 
“The work you do is so intriguing because of the creative ways scientists solve problems that people face every day. To actually go and experience how people work on a daily basis really makes you see and think about if you would like to do this same work.” Alexa 

Workplace Explorations

Apprentice Learning is dedicated to adapting its service to collaborate with other educational programs, we created an additional program component, Workplace Explorations, that will be taught in conjunction with Boston Public Schools and BELL for a remedial summer school program. Program attendees are 8th graders who have not met all of their graduation requirements and must complete summer learning requirements before going to high school in the fall. Workplace Explorations are guided experiences that teach students self-presentation skills and other basic workplace skills and provide background and vocabulary on a particular industry to make the most of a workplace visit. Worksite activities are designed for maximum engagement with adult professionals using a hands-on approach to understanding a business’ culture and mission.

Budget  --
Category  Employment, General/Other Youth Job Training & Employment
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  The short-term success goals of this program are the same as the Apprentice Program.
Program Long-Term Success  The long-term success goals of this program are the same as the Apprentice Program.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  Examples of program success for the Workplace Explorations have been folded into the Apprentice Program.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Helen Russell
CEO Term Start July 2012
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Helen Russell, founder of Apprentice Learning has been developing, launching and directing experiential learning programs for youth in Boston for over 25 years. Her career integrates expertise in youth development, experiential education, program management, and fundraising. Apprentice Learning builds on the success of the School-to-Community Initiative (SCI), which Ms. Russell developed and directed at Boston's Mission Hill School from 1998 to 2005. It draws on her past experience as the Direictor of External Affairs for over a decade with both the Mission Hill School and Boston Arts Academy. Prior to her work with the Boston Public Schools, she worked as the Program Director for Thompson Island Outward Bound, the outdoor leadership program that helps young people develop skill and courage. Thompson Island, in Boston, one of the organization's pioneering urban centers, served 20,000 children, educators, and adults each year in a variety of experience and adventure-based programs. A proponent of program models that anchor young people's learning in the real world, Ms. Russell believes that students reach their best potential when they are asked to contribute to meaningful, real-world goals, especially when they work within teams to achieve those goals. She holds a B.A. in Psychology from Boston College, and an M.Ed from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Christopher Moncrief Program Director Chris Moncrief believes in the growth of urban communities and had led a number of different service based organizations where he raised funds, produced programming, and created initiatives aimed toward supporting urban youth. Most recently he worked as the Program Director for Timberlake Summer Camp of Farm and Wilderness in Plymouth, VT. Chris is from the Bronx, New York and has a Bachelors of Arts in Sociology from Syracuse University School of Arts and Sciences and a Bachelor of Arts in Policy Studies from the Syracuse University Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 1
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 1
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Ms Helen Russell
Board Chair Company Affiliation Apprentice Learning
Board Chair Term July 2012 - June 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr Cinqué Dunham-Carson The Bottom Line Voting
Ms. Jermaine Reid The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering At Harvard Voting
Ms. Helen Russell Apprentice Learning Voting
Ms Jane Scarborough PhD, LLC, Northeastern University (retired) Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $152,982.00
Projected Expense $141,583.00
Form 990s

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 --
Total Revenue $104,694 $73,612 --
Total Expenses $89,912 $60,468 --

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 --
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 --
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $104,866 $75,997 --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $-172 $-2,385 --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 --
Program Expense $89,912 $59,003 --
Administration Expense -- $1,465 --
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.16 1.22 --
Program Expense/Total Expenses 100% 98% --
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% --

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 --
Total Assets $28,187 $21,814 --
Current Assets $28,059 $21,571 --
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 --
Current Liabilities $261 $8,670 --
Total Net Assets $27,926 $13,144 --

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 --
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 2.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 --
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 107.51 2.49 --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 --
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

This nonprofit is newer and began its work in 2012. As such, only two full years of financial data is posted above. Additional data will be posted as it becomes available. Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note, per the nonprofit, the amount listed under government contributions in the Form 990 for fiscal years 2014 and 2013 is from individuals, as such, it has been placed in the Individuals category above.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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