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Design Museum Boston Inc.

 15 Channel Center Street, #211
 Boston, MA 02210
[P] (617) 6103664
[F] --
www.designmuseumboston.org
[email protected]
Sam Aquillano
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INCORPORATED: 2009
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 27-0816164

LAST UPDATED: 09/23/2016
Organization DBA Design Museum Foundation
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

We bring the transformative power of design everywhere, to inspire a world full of creative problem solvers by producing inspiring exhibitions and events, educating everyone from kids to CEOs in design thinking, and transforming cities and communities through innovative public demonstration projects.

Mission Statement

We bring the transformative power of design everywhere, to inspire a world full of creative problem solvers by producing inspiring exhibitions and events, educating everyone from kids to CEOs in design thinking, and transforming cities and communities through innovative public demonstration projects.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $490,000.00
Projected Expense $475,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Extraordinary Playscapes
  • UNITE
  • Urban Innovation Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

We bring the transformative power of design everywhere, to inspire a world full of creative problem solvers by producing inspiring exhibitions and events, educating everyone from kids to CEOs in design thinking, and transforming cities and communities through innovative public demonstration projects.

Background Statement

At Design Museum Boston we believe design can change the world. Done well, it can elevate our quality of life, make business more competitive, and protect ur environment. Design awareness, education , and expertise are more important now than ever before as design continues to impact communities, organizations, and markets around the world.
 
We're redefining what it means to be a museum in the 21st century — we are online, nomadic, and accessible to all through a collection of exhibitions, events, and content. Design is everywhere. So are we.
The idea for Design Museum Boston was formed in March 2008 when founders, Sam Aquillano and Derek Cascio — both young Boston design leaders — realized that the public was barely aware of the world-class design work being produced in the Greater Boston Area. Aquillano was an industrial designer at Bose Corporation, Cascio a designer at Philips — both taught design at Wentworth Institute of Technology and chaired the Boston chapter of the Industrial Designers Society of America. They talked about establishing a museum where visitors could see exhibitions and events featuring local design thought leadership.
The museum was incorporated in August 2009, during one of the worst economic recessions in history. Despite their best efforts and access to a broad network, the team was unable to secure funds or lease space. That’s when they began noticing vacant retail spaces and other underutilized public space. One evening they mapped out their novel solution on the back of a empty pizza box, they would establish a pop-up, nomadic museum utilizing all the empty real estate they found around the city for exhibitions, events, and workshops. 'Design is everywhere. So are we.’ became a mantra — the parallel between design’s ubiquity and the museum moving around the city providing the basis for the launch of a totally new type of museum. The all-volunteer team launched their first exhibition at Boston City Hall in December 2010 and received a National Endowment for the Arts Our Town Grant in 2011 to explore placemaking strategies in Boston’s Innovation District. In 2012, Design Museum Boston was accepted into MassChallenge, the world’s largest startup accelerator. And in 2013, Founder, Sam Aquillano was a featured speaker at TEDxBoston.

Impact Statement

In the last year, we launched our latest public exhibition: Extraordinary Playscapes. Three years in the making, it’s about design and the importance of outdoor play featuring 40 case studies of amazing playgrounds from around the world. There’s a historic timeline as well as scientific studies connecting outdoor play to physical, mental, social, and creative health. We’ve installed 2 new playscapes in Boston, (City Hall Plaza and Greenway) both of which have engaged their respective communities. We’ve installed our Beacons at 4 playgrounds: Charlestown, Cambridge, Back Bay, and Mattapan. We’ve produced thought leadership events and kid-focused design workshops. The whole program is linked by a print and online publication: the Playground Passport.
 
We’ve grown our organizational capacity by bringing on an Associate Director and an Executive Assistant We’ve realized exciting growth of our Board of Directors and Advisory Council. Our board has grown from 5 members to 9, and our Advisory Council now has 12 active members. Over the past year we’ve been able to accrue a very modest cash reserve of $20,000. It’s a small, but important, start to our work to achieve financial stability.
 
In our current year our strategic priorities include: (1) Grow our operating reserve so we can take calculated risks towards our goals. Starting an individual donor program is a key element of this priority and we’re kicking off this program this year. (2) Produce programming around design & play, including thought leadership events and kid-focused workshops. We’ll also launch our Urban Innovation Program with a 3-day urban design festival, which will lead to tactical urbanism installations around Boston.We’ll also continue to produce monthly events on design impact. (3) Raise our national profile through content development, storytelling, and media by channeling our design impact-focused content into finished media products like our new website, forthcoming magazine, and podcasts.

Needs Statement

 Design Museum Boston’s 5 most pressing needs include:

  • We need to increase our support staff to unburden senior staff so that they may focus on strategy and development. Staff needs include: Marketing Associate ($35k), Graphic Designer ($32k), Membership Coordinator ($40k), and Exhibition Producer ($40k).
  • We need to fully fund our Urban Innovation Program, a multi-year program to demonstrate how design can impact the urban environment and increase livability. Follow our 3-day Urban Innovation Festival we’ll have 10 tactical urbanism project that can be built and installed around the city. ($100k)
  • We need office space ($20k/year) and dedicated exhibition fabrication space ($15k/year)
  • We need to launch an individual donor strategy — so far we’re self-implementing a strategy, we’d be more successful if we could bring on the fundraising consulting group we’ve identified. ($25k)
  • We need to develop long-term financial sustainability by growing our cash reserve from $20k to $120k, so we can undertake calculated risk and grow our impact. ($100k)


CEO Statement

I started the museum because I saw a gap between design impact and design awareness. Design impacts everything we see and do every second of every day. Before I launched the museum I was working as a corporate industrial designer at Bose, I was teaching design at Wentworth Institute of Technology and Massachusetts College of Art & Design, and running the local chapter of the Industrial Designers Society of America — in every aspect I was evangelizing the power of design as a process to tackle our toughest challenges. I’ve always believed design is the process that unlocks human creativity. A core problem with design is that despite being a near-universal way of thinking — we all identify as creative as children — design tends to be very inaccessible, relegated to experts and academics. I sought to create an institution that makes design accessible to all, where everyone can actively take part in addressing difficult problems that effect our society, economy, and environment. You don’t need to be a designer to participate in Design Museum Boston, you just need to be human. I truly believe that good, human-centered design can change the world. Design Museum Boston is a new kind of museum — an action-based museum — that celebrates great design and inspires thousands to be active creative problem solvers. Being a nomadic, multi-site museum allows us to reach audiences that traditional museums cannot and aligns us with the fact that design is everywhere. — Sam Aquillano, Founder & Executive Director

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA


Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Art Museums
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts & Culture
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Extraordinary Playscapes

Extraordinary Playscapes is a public exhibition program about design and the importance of outdoor play featuring 40 case studies of amazing playgrounds from around the world. There’s a historic timeline as well as scientific studies connecting outdoor play to physical, mental, social, and creative health. We’ve installed 2 new playscapes in Boston, (City Hall Plaza and Greenway) both of which have engaged their respective communities. We’ve installed our Beacons at 4 playgrounds: Charlestown, Cambridge, Back Bay, and Mattapan. We’ve produced thought leadership events and kid-focused design workshops. The whole program is linked by a print and online publication: the Playground Passport.
Budget  $200,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Museums
Population Served Families K-12 (5-19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success  The short-term goals of Extraordinary Playscapes are to drive traffic to the exhibition, thought leadership events, and kids-focused workshops as well as to local parks. We hope the exhibition gets people out of the house and exploring the city in playful ways.
Program Long-Term Success 
The long-term goals of Extraordinary Playscapes are to increase awareness of the importance of play in childhood development and improve the design of, and access to, outdoor play environments. We also aim to catalyze real social change. About 1 out of 3 America children and adolescents are considered to be overweight or obese, and only 1 in 4 adolescents get at least 60 minutes of outdoor active play per day. Lack of outdoor play including lack of access to well-designed outdoor playspaces is also linked to increased mental illness and drops in creativity and executive function. If Extraordinary Playscapes is successful we can improve physical, mental, social, and creative health in children (and adults).
Program Success Monitored By  Because the nature of the impact we’re attempting to create is complex and long-term, we measure short-term success by monitoring the merits of the key messages behind our exhibitions, events, workshops, and demonstration projects. We measure attendance as well as Net Promoter Score: We use a three-question survey that took respondents less than five minutes: (1) "On a scale of 0 to 10 with 10 being extremely likely, how likely are you to recommend our company to a friend or colleague? (2) Why did you give us that score? (3) What can we do to earn a 10?” Scores of "9" and "10" are recognized as "promoters." Scores of "7" or "8" are recognized as "passives." Scores of "6" or lower are "detractors." The percent of responders that are "detractors" are subtracted from the percent of responders that are "promoters." The result is the net promoter score.
Examples of Program Success  Over 3,000 people have attended the Extraordinary Playscapes exhibition in the first month. Our thought leadership events have reached 400 attendees, and our kid-focused design workshops have inspired 80 children so far. Our average Net Promoter Score for Extraordinary Playscapes is 46. One example of program success that goes beyond the data around attendance and net promoter score is the fact that one of our collaborators, the Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy, has hired a full-time Play Coordinator to bring more playful programming to the Greenway and engage kids and families in play.

UNITE

A quarterly event series offering designers and non-designers alike an opportunity to connect and learn about each other. Held at a unique locations throughout the city and beyond, UNITE events create an environment for sharing experiences and building new relationships centralized around design and its impact on our lives. UNITE events are open to all with the audience ranging from people in their 20s to those in their 60s and above. We strive to reach as broad a cross section of the population as we can. We achieve this by partnering with non-design organizations for each event. This helps to ensure the we attract people outside of the design community. Each event is based on a uniting theme and interesting design intersections, such as entrepreneurship, placemaking, or manufacturing. The event kicks off with a discussion between thought leaders on different sides of the intersection and finishes with Q&A from the audience.
Budget  $30,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Museums
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success  The short-term goal of UNITE is to drive attendance to the quarterly events so we can impact a broad audience through access to innovative thought leaders.
Program Long-Term Success  The long-term goal of UNITE is to inspire impactful change through creative problem solving. If we’re successful more people will collaborate with a diverse group of people to solve complex problems using design thinking.
Program Success Monitored By  Because the nature of the impact we’re attempting to create is complex and long-term, we measure short-term success by monitoring the merits of the key messages behind our exhibitions, events, workshops, and demonstration projects. We measure attendance as well as Net Promoter Score: We use a three-question survey that took respondents less than five minutes: (1) "On a scale of 0 to 10 with 10 being extremely likely, how likely are you to recommend our company to a friend or colleague? (2) Why did you give us that score? (3) What can we do to earn a 10?” Scores of "9" and "10" are recognized as "promoters." Scores of "7" or "8" are recognized as "passives." Scores of "6" or lower are "detractors." The percent of responders that are "detractors" are subtracted from the percent of responders that are "promoters." The result is the net promoter score.
Examples of Program Success  We average 110 person attendance per UNITE event and the average net promoter score is 63.

Urban Innovation Program

The Urban Innovation Program is a multi-year, multi-faceted public program to demonstrate that design can improve and transform the livability of the built environment. It’s a placemaking initiative focused on the area below the Interstate-93 overpass, but will also generate ideas to improve the areas below and around highways around the world. Situated between Boston’s Chinatown, South Boston, Dorchester, and South End neighborhoods, the overpass divides the neighborhoods and creates a dark, underutilized space in what should be the heart of Boston’s artistic and innovation core.
Budget  $250,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Museums
Population Served Adults Adolescents Only (13-19 years) General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  The short-term goal of the Urban Innovation Program is to drive participation in our public demonstration projects and events in order to increase awareness and take collective action to improve the urban environment.
Program Long-Term Success  The long-term goal of the Urban Innovation Program is to improve the livability under and around the I-93 overpass near Boston’s South End neighborhood — including improving public safety, wayfinding, lighting, and more.
Program Success Monitored By  Because the nature of the impact we’re attempting to create is complex and long-term, we measure short-term success by monitoring the merits of the key messages behind our exhibitions, events, workshops, and demonstration projects. We measure attendance as well as Net Promoter Score: We use a three-question survey that took respondents less than five minutes: (1) "On a scale of 0 to 10 with 10 being extremely likely, how likely are you to recommend our company to a friend or colleague? (2) Why did you give us that score? (3) What can we do to earn a 10?” Scores of "9" and "10" are recognized as "promoters." Scores of "7" or "8" are recognized as "passives." Scores of "6" or lower are "detractors." The percent of responders that are "detractors" are subtracted from the percent of responders that are "promoters." The result is the net promoter score.
Examples of Program Success  Over 1000 people have attended Urban Innovation Program events. We’re about to launch our Urban Innovation Festival in July 2016, a 3-day event in which 10 teams of 6 innovators will tackle urban challenges in real time. We’ll measure attendance at the Festival and net promoter score.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Sam Aquillano
CEO Term Start Aug 2009
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Sam Aquillano earned a BFA in Industrial Design from Rochester Institute of Technology and went on to design consumer electronics at Bose Corporation, as well as to teach design at Wentworth Institute of Technology, MassArt, and Babson College — where he earned his MBA. With a passion for design, creativity, and learning, Sam creates a long-term vision for the museum and leads a dedicated team while managing key programs and directing strategic operations.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Elizabeth Pawlak Associate Director
Liz Pawlak came to Design Museum Boston with a passional for design. She was formerly an architectural designer at Payette Associates, where she also chaired the Young Designers Core, producing programming for young architecture leaders. She holds a degree in Architecture from Syracuse University. At Design Museum Boston Liz manages Boston programmatic development and fundraising.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 7
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 40
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. David Silverman
Board Chair Company Affiliation Silverman Trykowski Associates
Board Chair Term Sept 2013 - Aug 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Debora Aldrich DandA Company Voting
Ms. Dawn Barrett Mass. College of Art and Design Voting
Mr. Scott Englander Longwood Energy Group LLC Voting
Ms. Zeina Grinnell Mass Ave Properties Voting
Ms. Lauren Jezienicki The Bozzuto Group Voting
Ms. Elizabeth Lowrey Elkus Manfredi Voting
Mr. Jeff Monahan Proper Villains Voting
Mr. David Morgan NH Association for the Blind Voting
Mr. David Silverman Silverman Trykowski Associates Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Meghan Allen FCi NonVoting
Mr. Philip Barash Sasaki NonVoting
Mr. Derek Cascio Hasbro NonVoting
Mr. Marc D'Amore Heart NonVoting
Mr. Caleb Dean Owl, Fox, & Dean NonVoting
Ms. Lisa Gralneck MOO NonVoting
Ms. Elizabeth Gross Bank of America NonVoting
Ms. Emily Rawitsch Invaluable NonVoting
Mr. Dieter Reuther Cast Collective NonVoting
Mr. Aaron Scott Your Brand Week NonVoting
Ms. Asha Srikantiah Fidelity NonVoting
Ms. Bindi Tuli Robin Hood Associates NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $490,000.00
Projected Expense $475,000.00
Form 990s

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

Audit Documents

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Reviewed Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $384,427 $300,963 $82,738
Total Expenses $401,257 $243,144 $67,295

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $98,420 $157,296 $82,738
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $193,762 $143,165 --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues $89,467 -- --
Special Events $2,778 -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $300,963 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $274,329 $87,758 $21,680
Administration Expense $106,671 $125,586 $45,615
Fundraising Expense $20,257 $29,800 --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.96 1.24 1.23
Program Expense/Total Expenses 68% 36% 32%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 20% 19% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $72,498 $81,490 $17,365
Current Assets $40,298 $62,345 $6,318
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $61,512 $3,316 $0
Total Net Assets $10,986 $78,174 $17,365

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 1.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 0.66 18.80 --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?



2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?


   

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?