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The Cookbook Project

 4035 Washington Avenue
 New Orleans, LA 70125
[P] (617) 8692005
[F] (484) 9100567
www.thecookbookproject.org
[email protected]
[email protected] adam
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INCORPORATED: 2010
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 30-0689078

LAST UPDATED: 05/03/2016
Organization DBA Food Literacy Initiative
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

To ensure that all children have access to critical food literacy and cooking education by training educators, enrichment staff, parents, and volunteers to lead The Cookbook Project curriculum in their own communities. 

Mission Statement

To ensure that all children have access to critical food literacy and cooking education by training educators, enrichment staff, parents, and volunteers to lead The Cookbook Project curriculum in their own communities. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $135,000.00
Projected Expense $126,490.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. The New Orleans Food Literacy Initiative (NOFLI)
  • 2. The Boston Food Literacy Initiative
  • 3. The Global Online Food Literacy Educator Training Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

To ensure that all children have access to critical food literacy and cooking education by training educators, enrichment staff, parents, and volunteers to lead The Cookbook Project curriculum in their own communities. 

Background Statement

The Cookbook Project (CBP) is a 501c3 non-profit organization with a mission to ensure that all children have access to critical food literacy and cooking education. To achieve this mission, CBP employs a 3-tiered impact model. Food Literacy Educators (FLEDs) are trained through online and onsite immersion training programs to lead CBPs innovative health education curriculum in their own community. The curriculum is specifically designed for low-income youth at-risk for chronic lifestyle-related diseases but has been effective in urban, rural, low-income, and wealthy communities during the research and development phase of programming with participants age ranges from 2-80.

Program participants are then certified as Community Food Ambassadors (CFAs), spreading their knowledge and skills at the family and neighborhood level. Although practically focused on culturally relevant cooking and nutrition, CBP’s experiential model ultimately empowers community leaders of all ages to be self-sufficient and resilient agents of change. Every day, each person has the power to change the world through their food choices. CBP teaches others to cook the change they wish to see in themselves, and in the world.

CBP was founded in October 2010 in Massachusetts and received its 501(c)(3) status on November 17, 2010. Initially CBP began conducting international youth education workshops, and to date has led programming in 15 different countries across Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. In September of 2011 the organization received a seed grant to create an online training platform for sustainable domestic expansion. Since then CBP has trained over 900 FLEDs through online and onsite training programs, representing 35 US states and 22 different countries, with the majority of leaders based in the US. Major partners have included City Year, AmeriCorps, HealthCorps, Peace Corps, Food Corps, The Institute for Integrative Nutrition, The Natural Gourmet Institute, and the International Culinary Center in addition to a diverse range of community-based organizations.

As of 2013, the organization pivoted its focus to develop a scalable, comprehensive model domestically. After a successful pilot in Boston, CBP has redirected its efforts to concentrate on developing an evidence-based, highly transferrable regional program model based off of the BOFLI partnership program, that incorporates a combination of onsite and online training components.

Impact Statement

Accomplishments in FY2014-15

1. Trained 183 Food Literacy Educators online

2. Awarded Propeller Accelerator Fellowship in New Orleans

3. Launched the The Boston Food Literacy Initiative (BOFLI), trained 56 City Year staff in 4 Boston Public Elementary Schools to lead full year programming with 120 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders

4) Launched New Orleans Food Literacy Initiative, comprehensive programming with partners across the city
 
5) Comprehensive redesign of training program
 
6) Over $25,000 in earned revenue 
 
7) Launched impact assessment that demonstrated proof of concept (97% of kids gained key food literacy skills, 100% of kids learned at least 3 new cooking skills, and 99% practiced new cooking skills at home with their families.
 
8) Awarded James Beard/Food Tank Award for Excellence 
 
 

Goals for FY 2015-16

1. To train 350 Food Literacy Educators 

2. To build national relationships with 3 additional organizations

3. To expand program impact through the addition of key staff members

4. Achieve financial sustainability

5. Earn more than $40,000 in earned revenue 

Needs Statement

1. Increased funding, must raise $150,000 for FY15 and $225,000 for FY16

2. Human capital for programs, communication, and development

3. Board of Directors expansion

4. Media coverage in a national publication

5. Financial management and marketing/PR professional support

CEO Statement

The Cookbook Project is an innovative non-profit that is disrupting the dominant storyline for low-income at-risk youth that equates poverty with equates poverty with poor health. CBP programs are creating healthier, happier, and more sustainable communities through food literacy and cooking education locally and globally.


Board Chair Statement

The Cookbook Project is poised to create a model of health education, community engagement and food literacy that can enhance the lives of residents in every major US metropolitan area through Food Literacy Programs. New Orleans and Boston have become the ideal primary locations for our work due to founder and board member experience in the cities' school systems, the wider non profit community, and support demonstrated by local chefs, volunteers, and philanthropists.
 
After years of perfecting lessons and establishing successful international programs that transformed communities and how they grow, prepare and consume food, we are proud to bring CBP's headquarters back to the USA to focus on our anchor programs in Boston and New Orleans, LA. As a long time volunteer with the underserved community in the greater Boston area and a world traveler, I have seen that access to healthy food and developing healthy habits can make an incredible impact on families and children's abilities to perform in school and I am continuously blown away by Adam and Alissa's comprehensive approach to education, unique understanding of food history and culture, environmental consequences, and the limitations of current public services.
 
CBP provides the perfect program model for urban centers, complimenting and coordinating with existing services, and have found key partners in City Year, the Boston Public Schools, and the Barbara Lynch foundation. The Board's primary concern and responsibility at this point is to provide resources and build a sustainable fundraising plan to allow this program to grow and eventually expand into schools across Boston and other major metropolitan areas. We plan to increase marketing efforts to build awareness, bring on additional Working and Advisory Board members, major donors, and create partnerships with key influencers and foundations who can advise us during these crucial first years building our anchor cities. Having worked as a professional fundraiser for over a decade, I am confident that CBP has all of the elements in place -- from leadership to past successes and impact -- to obtain funding for program expansion for years to come to address an urgent need in our community.

Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village

The Cookbook Project believes all children deserve access to food literacy and cooking education programs. To do this we train educators, enrichment staff, volunteers and parents to become Food Literacy Educators in their own communities.
 
The majority of Food Literacy Educators are implementing projects in the USA, with a growing international cohort.  We invite any and all educators, parents, and community members to join our training program! Apply at www.thecookbookproject.org/train
 

Organization Categories

  1. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Nutrition
  2. Education - Educational Services
  3. Health Care - Public Health

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

1. The New Orleans Food Literacy Initiative (NOFLI)

The New Orleans Food Literacy Initiative is training a network of city-based Food Literacy Educators to facilitate food literacy and cooking education programs for youth using the CBP curriculum.

Beginning in October 2014, The Cookbook Project began training a diverse array of New Orleans based-schools and community partners to lead programming at the local level. Youth participants learn about food literacy and gain critical healthy cooking and food budgeting skills, and ultimately be certified as Community Food Ambassadors (CFAs) to build health and sustainability in their own communities.
Budget  $42,800.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Nutrition
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

CBP Food Literacy Initiatives have demonstrated that programming has the following behavioral impact based on CBPs Curriculum Impact Study:


  • Youth participants were consuming more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains

  • Youth participants were consuming less processed food and added sugar

  • Youth were drinking more water

  • Youth were able to sleep more

  • Youth felt an enhanced ability to focus during the school day


In addition demonstrated impact on Food Literacy Educators has included the following:

· 99% felt better prepared to make healthier choices

· 75% were more likely to eat a home cooked meal

· 96% were consuming more fruits and vegetables

· 97% were avoiding packaged foods

· 92% were consuming less refined sugar

· 89% were buying and eating more local foods
Program Long-Term Success 

Ultimately, The New Orleans Food Literacy Initiative (NOFLI) will create a sustainable framework for healthier communities by building cooking competency and food literacy skills at the grassroots level. By building a generation of preventative health practitioners, programming will not only strengthen local economies but will reverse the chronic lifestyle-related disease epidemic that disproportionately affects low-income and minority populations.

NOFLI will disrupt the dominant storyline in low-income communities that equates poverty with poor health indicators. Students participating in the CBP program exit with the tools to be able to spark sustainable and healthy changes in their own communities.

CBP will know it has been successful when cooking skills and the sustainability of local food systems is a key component in New Orleans. Through CBP’s innovative education technology and ‘train the trainer’ model CBP is an excellent position to build momentum towards the ultimate goal outlined above.
Program Success Monitored By 

CBP uses a four-pronged framework to evaluate its effectiveness in making strategic decisions that will meet organizational objectives:

1. Does the initiative promote healthy eating?

2. Does the initiative promote sustainable decision-making?

3. Does the initiative create leadership opportunities?

4. Does the initiative serve community-based health and economic needs?

At the program level, CBP has developed several age-specific ‘Curriculum Impact Study’ evaluation tools to measure the relative impact of the Food Literacy Education Program on the behavior and skill acquisition of both Food Literacy Educators and Youth Community Food Ambassadors. During the FLI school-year programs, participants complete an initial assessment, a mid-program assessment, and a final assessment. Data from these assessments are used to evaluate program effectiveness and to gauge participant impact.
Examples of Program Success 

Data from CBP’s pilot phase programming demonstrates that CBP programs have the following impact on behavior change:

  • Youth participants were consuming more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains

  • Youth participants were consuming less processed food and added sugar

  • Youth were drinking more water

  • Youth were able to sleep more

  • Youth felt an enhanced ability to focus during the school day

In addition, of the adult Food Literacy Educators who participated in the training program:

· 99% felt better prepared to make healthier choices

· 75% were more likely to eat a home cooked meal

· 96% were consuming more fruits and vegetables

· 97% were avoiding packaged foods

· 92% were consuming less refined sugar

· 89% were buying and eating more local foods

2. The Boston Food Literacy Initiative

Based on a successful pilot project that was tested during the 2013/14 school year in Boston, The Boston Food Literacy Initiative is trains a network of City Year corps members serving youth in the Boston Public Schools. CBP trains all City Year staff in these schools as Food Literacy Educators to facilitate food literacy and cooking education programs for youth using the CBP curriculum.

In Boston, a city-wide team of 92 City Year staff is training with The Cookbook Project to reach over 200 students during the 2014/15 and 2015/16 school years. Four Boston Public Elementary Schools are hosting Food Literacy Initiative Programs. Youth participants at these schools will learn about food literacy and gain critical healthy cooking and food budgeting skills, and ultimately be certified as Community Food Ambassadors (CFAs) to build health and sustainability in their own communities.
Budget  $42,800.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Nutrition
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

CBP Food Literacy Initiatives have demonstrated that programming has the following short term behavioral impact based on CBPs Curriculum Impact Study:

  • Youth participants were consuming more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains
  • Youth participants were consuming less processed food and added sugar
  • Youth were drinking more water
  • Youth were able to sleep more
  • Youth felt an enhanced ability to focus during the school day

In addition demonstrated impact on Food Literacy Educators has included the following:

· 99% felt better prepared to make healthier choices

· 75% were more likely to eat a home cooked meal

· 96% were consuming more fruits and vegetables

· 97% were avoiding packaged foods

· 92% were consuming less refined sugar

· 89% were buying and eating more local foods

Program Long-Term Success 

Ultimately, the Boston Food Literacy Initiative will create a sustainable framework for healthier communities by building cooking competency and food literacy skills at the grassroots level.  By building a generation of preventative health practitioners programming will not only strengthen local economies but will reverse the chronic lifestyle-related disease epidemic that disproportionately affects low-income and minority populations.  

 BOFLI will disrupt the dominant storyline in low-income communities that equates poverty with poor health indicators. Students participating in the CBP program exit with the tools to be able to spark sustainable and healthy changes in their own communities.
 
CBP will know it has been successful when cooking skills and the sustainability of local food systems is a key component in Boston. Through CBP’s innovative education technology and ‘train the trainer’ model CBP is an excellent position to build momentum towards the ultimate goal outlined above. 
Program Success Monitored By 

CBP uses a four-pronged framework to evaluate its effectiveness in making strategic decisions that will meet organizational objectives:

1. Does the initiative promote healthy eating?

2. Does the initiative promote sustainable decision-making?

3. Does the initiative create leadership opportunities?

4. Does the initiative serve community-based health and economic needs?

At the program level, CBP has developed several age-specific ‘Curriculum Impact Study’ evaluation tools to measure the relative impact of the Food Literacy Education Program on the behavior and skill acquisition of both Food Literacy Educators and Youth Community Food Ambassadors. During the FLI school-year programs, participants complete an initial assessment, a mid-program assessment, and a final assessment. Data from these assessments are used to evaluate program effectiveness and to gauge participant impact.

Examples of Program Success 

Data from CBP’s pilot phase programming demonstrates that CBP programs have the following impact on behavior change:

  • Youth participants were consuming more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains

  • Youth participants were consuming less processed food and added sugar

  • Youth were drinking more water

  • Youth were able to sleep more

  • Youth felt an enhanced ability to focus during the school day

In addition, of the adult Food Literacy Educators who participated in the training program:

· 99% felt better prepared to make healthier choices

· 75% were more likely to eat a home cooked meal

· 96% were consuming more fruits and vegetables

· 97% were avoiding packaged foods

· 92% were consuming less refined sugar

· 89% were buying and eating more local foods

3. The Global Online Food Literacy Educator Training Program

This online leadership training program is 4 weeks long. Participants apply online, are reviewed through CBP’s application process, are accepted, and go through the certificate program at their own pace, guided by weekly live webinars that are scheduled throughout the program. Each participant works through the program materials they access online, which include a combination of video modules, curriculum PDFs and support materials, program planning resources and knowledge/skill assessments. All graduates must meet the program requirements, which include submitting a program proposal, course assignments, and demonstrating competency on a final online exam. The training is currently held quarterly (Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring), with a training cohort of up to 150 participants in each training (600 max each year). In the future, CBP hopes to transform this program into a rolling-admissions and self-paced leadership development opportunity with the capacity to train a much larger annual cohort.
Budget  $42,800.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Nutrition
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

CBP Food Literacy Initiatives have demonstrated that programming has the following behavioral impact based on CBPs Curriculum Impact Study:


  • Youth participants were consuming more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains

  • Youth participants were consuming less processed food and added sugar

  • Youth were drinking more water

  • Youth were able to sleep more

  • Youth felt an enhanced ability to focus during the school day


In addition demonstrated impact on Food Literacy Educators has included the following:

· 99% felt better prepared to make healthier choices

· 75% were more likely to eat a home cooked meal

· 96% were consuming more fruits and vegetables

· 97% were avoiding packaged foods

· 92% were consuming less refined sugar

· 89% were buying and eating more local foods

Program Long-Term Success 

Ultimately, the Online Food Literacy Educator Training program will create a sustainable framework for healthier communities by building cooking competency and food literacy skills at the grassroots level. By building a generation of preventative health practitioners programming will not only strengthen local economies but will reverse the chronic lifestyle-related disease epidemic that disproportionately affects low-income and minority populations.

This program will disrupt the dominant storyline in low-income communities that equates poverty with poor health indicators. Students participating in the CBP program exit with the tools to be able to spark sustainable and healthy changes in their own communities.

Through CBP’s innovative education technology and ‘train the trainer’ model CBP is an excellent position to build momentum towards the ultimate goal outlined above.
Program Success Monitored By 

CBP uses a four-pronged framework to evaluate its effectiveness in making strategic decisions that will meet organizational objectives:

1. Does the initiative promote healthy eating?

2. Does the initiative promote sustainable decision-making?

3. Does the initiative create leadership opportunities?

4. Does the initiative serve community-based health and economic needs?

At the program level, CBP has developed several age-specific ‘Curriculum Impact Study’ evaluation tools to measure the relative impact of the Food Literacy Education Program on the behavior and skill acquisition of both Food Literacy Educators and Youth Community Food Ambassadors. During the FLI school-year programs, participants complete an initial assessment, a mid-program assessment, and a final assessment. Data from these assessments are used to evaluate program effectiveness and to gauge participant impact.
Examples of Program Success 

Data from CBP’s pilot phase programming demonstrates that CBP programs have the following impact on behavior change:

  • Youth participants were consuming more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains

  • Youth participants were consuming less processed food and added sugar

  • Youth were drinking more water

  • Youth were able to sleep more

  • Youth felt an enhanced ability to focus during the school day

In addition, of the adult Food Literacy Educators who participated in the training program:

· 99% felt better prepared to make healthier choices

· 75% were more likely to eat a home cooked meal

· 96% were consuming more fruits and vegetables

· 97% were avoiding packaged foods

· 92% were consuming less refined sugar

· 89% were buying and eating more local foods


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Cookbook Projects innovative utilization of education technology in its online training program have provided CBP with an opportunity to appropriately scale-up programming across the globe with proper support.  If you would like to see CBP programming in your community please contact us at [email protected] and we will work with you to ensure that we can sustainably build food literacy and cooking education programs at the local level.  

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mrs Alissa Bilfield
CEO Term Start Oct 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Alissa Bilfield is the Co-founder and Executive Director of The Cookbook Project. She received her BA from Vanderbilt University, her MSc from The London School of Economics, and she is currently pursuing her doctorate in Public Health from Tulane University. She is an environmentalist and health educator with 13 years of experience working in the non-profit and government sectors, where she most recently worked for The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection on managing green building and recycling initiatives and policies. She is also a certified health counselor and a community-based cooking educator, and has spearheaded and managed programs on behalf of The Cookbook Project in over 15 different countries from Haiti to Indonesia via her work with The Cookbook Project.
Co-CEO Mr Adam Esak Aronovitz
Co-CEO Term Start Oct 2010
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience Adam Aronovitz is the Co-Founder and Director of The Cookbook Project. He received his BA from Tulane University and his MA from The University of Westminster. He is an educator with over 18 years of experience working in urban public schools in Boston and New Orleans, leading international service learning programs with Windsor Mountain International/Global Routes, and directing experiential learning programs in a variety of settings. Adam’s primary qualifications include curriculum design/development, economic and financial assessment, development skills, and teaching/facilitation skills.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 900
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 1
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Mrs. Emily Berman Levy
Board Chair Company Affiliation ACPYL
Board Chair Term Sept 2014 - Sept 2015
Board Co-Chair Mr. Adam Fliss
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation TPG
Board Co-Chair Term Sept 2014 - Sept 2015

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Adam Aronovitz The Cookbook Project Voting
Amy Barad Cowen Institute Voting
Alissa Bilfield The Cookbook Project Voting
Adam Fliss TPG Voting
Anne Gates Anne Gates Consulting Voting
Jillian Lagasse Chef/Cookbook Author Voting
Rob Lalka Propeller Voting
Emily Berman Levy ACPYL Voting
Lucas Webster Newco Voting
Carol Wise Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Anny Bedard Consultant NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Marketing
  • Nominating
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Cookbook Project is committed to ensuring that all children haves access to critical Food Literacy and Cooking Education Programming. We welcome inquiries from any individual, organization, or company that shares our vision for a healthier world. Please contact us at [email protected]

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $135,000.00
Projected Expense $126,490.00
Form 990s

2013 990-N

2012 990-N

2011 990-N

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $213,941 $127,912 $114,110
Total Expenses $198,372 $122,096 $113,800

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$39,400 $2,000 --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $25,590 $3,820 $3,500
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $32,078 $3,750 $2,500
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- $22,982 $17,750
Revenue In-Kind $116,720 $95,360 $90,360
Other $152 -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $156,747 $120,826 $112,860
Administration Expense $26,625 $1,270 $940
Fundraising Expense $15,000 -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.08 1.05 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 79% 99% 99%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 23% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $14,868 $0 $0
Current Assets $14,868 $0 $0
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $14,868 $0 $0

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose The purpose of CBP's capital campaign will be to build a CBP community kitchen HQ.
Campaign Goal $1,500,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates Jan 2018 - Dec 2019
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $0.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

This nonprofit is newer and began its work in 2010. The Cookbook Project received its nonprofit status from the IRS in 2011, as indicated in the IRS Letter of Determination posted above. The data in the charts and graphs above is per the nonprofit.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

To create healthier communities and a more sustainable environment through food literacy and cooking education. CBP strives to disrupt the dominant storyline in low-income communities that equates poverty with poor health indicators. Students participating in the CBP program exit with the tools to be able to spark sustainable and healthy changes in their own communities.

For the Cookbook Project, long-term success entails empowering a generation of cooking-competency and food literacy practitioners, especially in low-income areas that are most susceptible to chronic lifestyle-related diseases.

CBP will know it has been successful when cooking skills and the sustainability of local food systems is a key component of all communities across the globe. Through CBP’s innovative education technology and ‘train the trainer’ model CBP is an excellent position to build momentum towards the ultimate goal outlined above.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

To achieve this mission, CBP employs a 3-tiered impact model. Food Literacy Educators (FLEDs) are trained through online and onsite immersion to lead CBPs unique health education curriculum that targets youth at-risk for chronic lifestyle-related diseases. Program participants (majority of whom are youth participants) then become certified as Community Food Ambassadors (CFAs), spreading their knowledge and skills at the family and neighborhood level. This 3-tiered model enables CBP to multiply impact exponentially through the power of innovative education technology and localized approach that puts individual communities at the center of programming.

Current progress includes a 5 year expansion plan for the national Food Literacy Initiative. The first program was piloted in 2013/14 in Boston, and officially launched in 2014/15. In partnership with City Year, additional cities will be incorporated into the initiative over the next 5 years before expanding nationwide and globally.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

CBP Leadership is a unique position to tackle this monumental goal because leadership has tested the curriculum and short-term impact with a diverse range of communities all over the world ranging from subsistence farming communities in Uganda to an upscale summer camp in New Hampshire. CBP staff have worked on the front lines New Orleans and Boston Public Schools and deeply understand why current approaches have not been successful.

At an early stage CBP has cultivated dynamic partnerships with City Year, AmeriCorps and top chefs in the United States to provide a triangle support structure for programming. As additional organization become aware of CBP and CBP’s ability to train their staff these partnerships will continue to grow exponentially.

CBP has over 3 years of experience facilitating online training programs from the far reaches of the globe ranging from India to Indonesia. As CBP leadership has shifted to the United States the organization will be even more efficient in its pursuit of the ultimate goal: to empower a generation of cooking competency and food literacy expertise at the grassroots level.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

CBP is informed by the results of the Curriculum Impact Study that provides key information about participant growth and milestone achievements that include meals prepared, recipes created, and positive health indicators achieved.

 Following the first year Curriculum Impact Study in 2014-15 CBP learned that 100% of participating students learned at least 3 new cooking skills, 99% were cooking at home with their families, and 97% gained food literacy and food choice skills.
 
CBP is always improving its strategies for impact assessment as the organization learns the various ways the program is being implemented in the field.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

CBP has achieved one of its primary goals by launching a sustainable distance-learning platform that incorporates innovative educational technology and is a low-cost solution to health education. CBP has received overwhelmingly positive feedback from FLEDs and youth participants which continually informs CBP strategies.

CBP is yet to achieve its goal of having regional leadership facilitating trainings and impact support in key areas across the country and the globe.