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Community Call

 Community Call c/o Fisher College, 118 Beacon Street
 Boston, MA 02116
[P] (617) 236-1936
[F] (781) 253-3902
www.communitycall.org
[email protected]
Carolyn Edwards
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INCORPORATED: 2012
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 45-4153514

LAST UPDATED: 07/20/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Community Call develops life, leadership, and job readiness skills through student-centered, experiential civic participation for youth in a safe space to have a positive impact on their lives and the community. We utilize strategies that connect youth through collaboration with community partners, government officials, and agencies to address broader community issues. Our students choose a social issue to address by conceiving, developing and implementing a group project for, and in collaboration with the community.

Mission Statement

Community Call develops life, leadership, and job readiness skills through student-centered, experiential civic participation for youth in a safe space to have a positive impact on their lives and the community. We utilize strategies that connect youth through collaboration with community partners, government officials, and agencies to address broader community issues. Our students choose a social issue to address by conceiving, developing and implementing a group project for, and in collaboration with the community.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $150,000.00
Projected Expense $150,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • MA Homeless Youth Task Force (MHYTF)
  • Participatory Civic Engagement Program
  • YouthDOORS
  • YouthWOKE

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Community Call develops life, leadership, and job readiness skills through student-centered, experiential civic participation for youth in a safe space to have a positive impact on their lives and the community. We utilize strategies that connect youth through collaboration with community partners, government officials, and agencies to address broader community issues. Our students choose a social issue to address by conceiving, developing and implementing a group project for, and in collaboration with the community.


Background Statement

Community Call has been recognized for outstanding youth development programming by the City of Boston, Harvard University, the Boston City Council and the Boston Youth Services Network. We are a true change agent collaborating with: government, community organizations, schools, and businesses to bring about change in our students and the community through student-centered civic engagement. Our students define their own agenda from objectives to action.

A 501(c)(3) since 2012, we work with at-risk and opportunity high school students. Our school year program has been offered at numerous BPS High Schools and community centers.
 
Sample student topics include bullying, gang violence, youth suicide prevention, uniqueness, gentrification, and youth homelessness. Collaborations have included over 75 nonprofits, dozens of government agencies, businesses and educational partners. Event locations range from Boston Common to the Boston Public Library to community centers.
 
Our program can be community or school-based (in and after-school). In 2015, we offered programming at Freedom House (Dorchester) and  the Harvard Ed Portal (Allston). In 2016, we began sponsorship of a cohort of youth living on their own and advocating for homeless youth rights.
 
Our first Summer Youth Ambassador Leadership program for the Mayor's Summer Youth Program was in 2016. These students launched a City-wide youth social justice group. YouthWOKE includes students from across BPS advocating on the racial climate issues within the public schools in collaboration with BPS Administration to create awareness and make positive changes to improve the school environment for all. The program meets weekly at the BPS headquarters and holds City-wide events for BPS high school students.
 
In 2017, we launched YouthDoors, providing collaboration to open doors for disadvantaged youth to expanding learning outside the classroom through teaching, mentoring, and networking opportunities with Boston area professionals in education and business. Our first partner for collaboration was Microsoft with a program hosted for youth at Boston City Hall.
 
In the fall of 2017, we are expanding our geographic reach with an educational center in Cambridge serving high school youth from Greater Boston. Our goal is to serve at-risk youth in Greater Boston through experiential civic programming and collaboration to maximize opportunities and positive outcomes.  

 


Impact Statement

Unique Outcomes Include: 

  • Recognized for outstanding programming by the City of Boston, Harvard University, the Boston City Council, and the Boston Youth Services Network
  • More than a dozen classes taught at six BPS High Schools, Freedom House, the Harvard Ed Portal, and BPS Headquarters
  • Students from every Boston neighborhood and a diverse population of ethnicity, ability, LGBTQ, homelessness, and special needs
  • Community collaboration with over 75 non-profits, numerous government agencies, higher education, and businesses
  • A social justice group (YouthWOKE) based in the BPS headquarters addressing racial issues in the schools and the community
  • A City-wide youth homelessness initiative with the Mayor resulting in a homeless youth task force and over $2 million from Liberty Mutual in grant money for youth homelessness and the Mayor’s commitment to end Boston youth homelessness
  • A two-day CORI Job program at Madison Park including resume writing, CORI rights, interviewing skills, professional dress, motivational speakers, and onsite interviewing
  • A youth voice Gentrification website presented to Boston Housing
  • A school-wide bullying program at a social/emotional/learning disabled inclusion school including testimonies from students and teachers and coping tips
  • Youth violence prevention programs with a resource fair, a discussion on youth violence, and a de-escalation workshop
  • Pride Day event in Copley Plaza
  • A families in need resource fair on Boston Common

 


Needs Statement

We have been operational since January of 2012. Our most immediate needs include funding for:
  1. Dedicated programming staff 
  2. Programming Supplies 
  3. Program Community Event Production Costs
  4. Technology for students 
  5. General Overhead 

CEO Statement

Now more than ever, we must civically engage our youth to protect the future of our Democracy and to correct the systemic social issues of our time.

Our program focuses on youth development, leadership skills and empowerment through active civic participation and experiential learning. We utilize strategies that connect youth through collaboration with community partners, government officials, and agencies to address broader community issues. Our students choose a social issue to address by conceiving, developing and implementing a group project for, and in collaboration with the community.

Community Call is innovative in these key areas:

  • Our program models serves all students regardless of economics, mental/physical ability, ethnicity, or social/societal background
  • Our programming is defined, directed, and managed by our students
  • Our safe space allows youth to use their life’s story as a catalyst for change and to discuss social issues without bias or fear
  • We make active civic engagement personal and meaningful for every student
  • Our projects are based on collaboration with the community including: government, business, higher education, and non-profits

Board Chair Statement

Our Board is passionate about the need to bring student-centered, experiential civic programming to marginalized youth. We recognize the impact that empowerment has on youth in the short term and the long term. That positive impact has been statistically documented and benefits youth and society.

Community Call is an organization that has a huge impact on marginalized youth and the community. The organization's work has been validated by our students, our collaborating partners, by City Government, and by higher education institutions. The program truly empowers youth by providing experiential opportunity in civic programming. Students use their lives as a catalyst for making a change in their lives and the community.
 
Our challenge as an organization is to continue to pursue our mission and create awareness of the exceptional work of the organization. As a truly innovative change agent, many try to compare our work with other organizations or measure our outcomes with old school standards. Being an innovator makes it more challenging for people to understand and appreciate your work but the organization continues to make its impact. Our biggest challenge is to get new funders to our organization.

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Local
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

We work with Boston economically disadvantaged youth, LGBTQ, youth living on their own, opportunity youth, ethnically diverse, court involved youth, and youth with emotional/learning disabilities. We look to provide opportunities in the places where youth are located. We work closely with the Boston Youth Services Network, Boston Public Schools, and the City of Boston which allows us to better identify and access the students we want to reach for our program. In 2017, we are expanding to Cambridge and the Greater Boston area.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Public & Societal Benefit - Citizen Participation
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Leadership Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

MA Homeless Youth Task Force (MHYTF)

MHYTF evolved from the Boston Homeless Youth Task Force. This program was launched by two homeless youth as a successor to our Eugene Johnson Project (http://www.communitycall.org/the-eugene-johnson-project-a-reality-check-on-youth-homelessness-in-boston/). The Boston task force evolved into an advisory group to the City of Boston. The founders of the task force than relaunched the group to address the homeless youth issue within colleges across the state. They are currently working with community colleges and four year colleges to develop an intercollegiate youth advisory council to raise awareness and address the issues of the estimated thousands of homeless college students within the State of Massachusetts.
 
Budget  $20,000.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Housing, General/Other
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) Homeless
Program Short-Term Success 

The goals of the Massachusetts Homeless Youth Task Force are multi-faceted. We aim to:

a) Create a network of youth who are currently experiencing homelessness or formerly homeless between 18-24 years old.

b) Conduct a needs assessment about unmet needs of homeless youth in Massachusetts by gathering information directly from homeless youth and key stakeholders.

c) Hold open, safe, and accessible meetings where homeless youth can voice their opinions and participate in strategy-based reform.

d) Implement homeless youth led projects in response to the needs identified by homeless youth.

e) Facilitate inter-agency collaboration to make key stakeholders aware of unmet needs and foster change in the Massachusetts homeless youth provider community

Program Long-Term Success 

The MHYTF is based on NAEHCY’s youth task force structure and concepts. NAEHCY is the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth. For the past several years, they have been sponsoring “local youth task forces” across the U.S. 

NAEHCY homeless youth task forces consist of 2 parts. The first part is the needs assessment. Task force members conduct a needs assessment with homeless youth and ask young people themselves what they want to see change. Second, task force members come up with priorities and devise plans or projects to provide solutions to the problems identified by homeless youth. The task force collaborates with agencies and organizations in Massachusetts to implement solutions.

The Massachusetts Homeless Youth Task Force was formerly the Boston Homeless Youth Task Force. See the Boston Homeless Youth Task Force’s website for more information: www.bhytf.org

Program Success Monitored By  Success will be monitored through the collaboration of community partners, the engagement of homeless youth, and the impact of their initiatives.
Examples of Program Success  The Boston Homeless Youth Task Force made Boston youth homelessness a priority for the Mayor of Boston. He formerly adopted the task force and they are working with the City's Department of Housing and the Public Health Department to help eradicate youth homelessness in Boston.

Participatory Civic Engagement Program

Our program focuses on youth development, leadership skills and empowerment through active civic participation and experiential learning. Our strategies connect youth through collaboration with community partners, government officials, and agencies to address broader community issues. Our students choose a social issue to address by conceiving, developing and implementing a group project for, and in collaboration with the community.

 
Community Call is innovative because:
  • Our program models serves all students regardless of economics, mental/physical ability, ethnicity, or social/societal background
  • Our programming is defined, directed, and managed by our students
  • Our safe space allows youth to use their life’s story as a catalyst for change and to discuss social issues without bias or fear
  • We make active civic engagement personal and meaningful for every student
  • Our projects are based on collaboration with the community including: government, business, higher education, and non-profits
http://www.communitycall.org/about-us/
Budget  $100,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Youth:

  • identify, manage and appropriately express emotions and behaviors
  • make positive decisions and access external supports
  • prevent, manage and resolve interpersonal conflicts in constructive ways
  • affiliate with peers who abstain from negative behaviors
  • advance and respect diversity in a multicultural world
  • feel a sense of belonging
  • demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)
  • model positive behaviors for peers
  • communicate their opinions and ideas to others

Youth develop:

  • healthy relationships
  • a strong sense of self
  • positive values
  • positive, sustained relationships with caring adults
  • positive relationships with peers
  • friendship skills
  • coping skills
  • cultural competence
  • social skills (e.g. interpersonal communication, conflict resolution)
  • demonstrate pro-social behavior


Program Long-Term Success 

Youth:

  • are on track for high school graduation
  • demonstrate critical thinking and decision-making skills (e.g. reasoning, analysis)
  • solve problems
  • work effectively in groups to accomplish learning goals
  • think creatively
  • express curiosity about topics learned in and out of school
  • school attendance improves
  • are motivated to learn
  • more likely to plan to attend postsecondary education
  • develop communication skills
  • develop positive work habits
  • develop knowledge about occupations
  • are aware of their interests and abilities
  • participate in community programs
  • demonstrate civic participation skills (e.g., compromise, perspective-taking)
  • feel empowered to contribute to positive change in their communities
  • volunteer/participate in community services
  • consider the implications of their actions on others, their community, and the environment
  • educate and inspire others to act

 

Program Success Monitored By 

We use the Youth Experience Survey from the University of Illinois survey for high-school aged adolescents about their developmental experiences in an extracurricular activity or community-based program. The survey measures growth in attitudes and skills including six conceptual domains of development: Identity, Work, Initiative, Basic Skills, Teamwork and Social Skills, Interpersonal Relationships, & Adult Networks.

Our students show significantly higher growth than the national results in 46/48 of the YES measurements.

Our highest scores indicate the program had a definitive impact on the student including:

  • Tried a new way of acting around people
  • I do things here I don't get to do anywhere else
  • This activity has been positive turning point in my life
  • Learned about developing plans for solving a problem
  • Learned about setting priorities
  • Learned that working together requires compromise
  • Learned how my emotions and attitude affects others in the group

 

Examples of Program Success 
Our programs have been recognized by the Boston City Council, Boston Youth Services Network, Harvard University and the City of Boston. Liberty Mutual awarded over $2 million to organizations based on our Homeless Youth project.
 
Example student programs include:
  • Boston Gentrification Project with the City of Boston
  • Let's Talk About Bullying, prevention and consequences of bullying
  • Youth Employment Opportunity Initiative, 2 day employment preparation/job fair for CORI youth
  • Rise Up Stand Up on youth suicide prevention/awareness
  • Tonight's the Night...And You're the Star - stereotyping awareness in a creative mixer social
  • Stop the Violence Unity Bash anti-violence workshop/social
  • The Eugene Johnson Project - A Reality Check on Boston Youth Homelessness with Mayor Walsh 
  • Express Yourself - Celebrating Uniqueness on Boston Pride Day
  • Beat The Street - Youth Resource Fair to keep youth off the streets
  • Play it Forward - A Community Resource Fair for economically depressed families

 



YouthDOORS

YouthDOORS opens doors for disadvantaged youth to expand learning outside the classroom through teaching, mentoring, and networking opportunities with professionals in education, business, and the Boston area community. Our vision is collaboration with all aspects of the community to maximize opportunities and positive outcomes for disadvantaged youth.

 
Companies of any size or industry can participate. Collaborations might include: introduction to coding, financial literacy, resume writing, a video game networking event, Lego competition, or robotics. Community Call provides these collaborations for free to disadvantaged and at-risk youth. Microsoft held a YouthDOORS event at Boston City Hall. Everyone was impressed with the programming and impact. One youth attendee said,  “Now that I know that allowing myself room to grow and learn will lead to more success, I should be able to better prepare myself for the future.” 
Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Youth Benefits:

  • Increased likelihood of academic success
  • Promoting healthier relationships and lifestyle choices
  • Increasing educational aspirations
  • Enhancing self-esteem and self-confidence
  • Strengthening interpersonal skills
  • Exposure to opportunities that can increase their future successes

Volunteer Benefits:

  • Ability to connect with youth in a mutually beneficial situation
  • Making a positive difference in the life of a youth
  • Improving your professional and social skills
  • Contributing to stronger communities by connecting directly and sharing your personal strengths
  • Increasing your patience and your supervisory skills
  • Potential opportunity for a life changing experience

Organization Benefits:

  • A fun, safe, and flexible way for civic engagement
  • Customizable to your resources and level of commitment
  • Single entry point for Boston area civic engagement
  • Collaboration logistics are managed by Community Call
  • Commitment is scalable with growth or can be scaled back for limited resources

 

Program Long-Term Success 
Long-term success will show a robust and sustainable network of collaborators representing a diverse group of companies, individuals, and youth. This diversity will include company size, ethnicity, skills, resources, and activities with youth.
 
If this program is truly successful, it will be the go-to place for connecting all aspects of the community to youth in the community. The hope is to truly create a One Boston where everyone is able to have access and provide resources to those most in need, especially at-risk and vulnerable youth to help break the cycle of poverty and social issues. 
Program Success Monitored By 
Program success will be continually monitored through interviews, surveys, observations, and other feedback. As the facilitator of these collaborations, it is imperative that Community Call consider all perspectives in terms of expectations, management, outcomes, and follow-up. Processes are currently being developed that include a company application process, confidentiality, and other relevant information to assure the safety and effectiveness of the program for all participants.
 
Success will also be measured by the continual increase in the YouthDoors network size from businesses, government agencies, higher education institutions, and other nonprofits. In addition to the network, the number of employees, youth, and activities will be monitored as measures of success.
Examples of Program Success 
Program success will be monitored as previously mentioned on a variety of levels. Examples of program success will include:
  • a robust network of collaborators
  • multiple events scheduled throughout the year
  • companies sending employees to the neighborhoods to interact with youth
  • positive survey results from collaborators and students
  • impact on students measured in terms of specific outcomes achieved as a result of the collaboration
  • community recognition for civic engagement on multiple levels
  • improved outcomes in community relationships 

YouthWOKE

YouthWOKE (Working on Knowledge & Equality) is a program developed, led, and managed by Community Call students. The students meet weekly through the school year at Boston Public Schools Headquarters as an independent student activist group.
 
Program Goal:
 
Foster a safe space for students to share and learn about racial issues affecting them while learning together and becoming empowered to create positive change in their own lives and others.
 

Objectives

  • Address students’ personal experiences in BPS, communities, and beyond
  • Form a connected community between all Boston high school students through communication
  • Share ideas to create positive solutions
  • Educate each other on different types of racism
  • Develop skill sets to best react to prejudice and racism
  • Learn youth development skills that are important for the future
  • Promote leadership and advocacy for youth
 More info at http://www.communitycall.org/youthwoke/
Budget  $10,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
YouthWOKE has already been featured on the Boston Neighborhood Network News, recognized for youth leadership as a presenter in a youth social entrepreneurship program at Harvard, and the subject of a student documentary.
Their first success was in securing an endorsement from the Boston Public Schools Administration recognizing the value of their program and hosting it within their headquarters. The group is completely independent but has access to the administration when needed or desired.
 
Their culminating community event for the year will be held in June of 2017 at a local college and will include workshops, speakers, and engaging activities. 
 
More information can be found at http://www.communitycall.org/youthwoke/ 
Program Long-Term Success 
This program was developed in response to racial climate issues in the Boston Public Schools. The students plan to continue to run the program out of BPS headquarters every school year in the near future. They will be hosting a community "awakening" event in June of 2017 for youth in the community to raise awareness, discuss the issues, and build bridges.
 
Other initiatives may include a social media campaign, meeting with activists, and mentoring opportunities among other possibilities. All programming is determined and developed by the youth. The goal is to develop a safe space for youth to discuss racial issues in the schools, community, and country and to find ways to raise awareness and make an impact.
Program Success Monitored By  Success is determined by the youth in terms of personal growth, interactions with others, sense of safety and security within the space, youth empowerment, and the strength, reach, and impact of their voice.
Examples of Program Success 
Students held a student produced event at Boston Latin School that included students from within the school and friends from outside to raise awareness and discuss racism within the school community. The students shared views as people of color and people of privilege. The event was attended by over 50 students, all of whom felt it was successful and meaningful.
 
The student leaders were invited to present to a peer group of social entrepreneurs as a summit at the Harvard Ed Portal. They inspired one of the attendees (a sophomore in a suburban school) to produce a brief documentary on the program. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Community Call takes pride in our ability to provide quality, student-centered, experiential civic engagement programming.

We are committed to breaking down silos and collaborating with government agencies, nonprofits, businesses, and higher education to connect youth and the community. We believe that youth who are engaged with their community, have a voice, and feel valued, will make better life choices benefiting themselves and the community. Studies show that youth who are civically engaged are more like to remain engaged with the community as adults.
 
Our goal is to give every youth in Greater Boston, the opportunity to make a difference in their lives and the community. We will work with any organization that shares this vision to make needed systemic changes to our society to provide equal opportunity to everyone.
 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Carolyn Edwards
CEO Term Start Jan 2012
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Carolyn Edwards (MS), has an extensive background in corporate and nonprofit management. Ms. Edwards worked for 25 years in Corporate America as a sales, service, and marketing executive, as well as a national consultant with clients ranging from small business to hospitals and universities to the board rooms of Fortune 50 companies. In addition to her corporate experience, Ms. Edwards has raised money for nonprofits since the age of seven through a variety of entrepreneurial events from backyard fairs to corporate sponsored holiday gift drives to formal events. Over the years, Ms. Edwards developed a talent and reputation for bringing creativity, education, business, and philanthropy together by building partnerships for those in need with those who can meet these needs.
 
In 2008, Ms. Edwards launched Cool Cat Events, an event planning business serving nonprofits, utilizing student talent from local colleges. Over 300 college students interned or volunteered on Cool Cat Event projects. In 2011, Ms. Edwards taught Event Management at Boston University’s School of Hospitality. In 2012, Ms. Edwards launched Community Call as a 501C3 with her own savings to provide experiential, student-centered learning to at risk high school and opportunity youth in the City of Boston. Since the program was launched, she has facilitated over a dozen courses at six BPS schools and several community based locations.
 
Ms. Edwards graduated Boston University’s School of Management with a double major in Management and Marketing and received a Masters degree in Nonprofit Management & Leadership from Northeastern University’s College of Professional Studies. She is currently a PhD Candidate at UMASS-Boston in Urban Education.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Social Justice Award for YouthWOKE Boston Latin School 2017
Community Champion Boston Youth Services Network 2016
Citation for Outstanding Youth Programming Boston City Council 2015
Harvard Allston Partnership Award Harvard University & The City of Boston 2015

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Change takes a community working together. We have no silos in collaboration benefiting the students or the community. Our program interacts with community leaders, government officials, businesses, activists, higher educational institutions and nonprofits with expertise on issues.

Our key partners are the Mayor's Youth Engagement Office, Boston Public Schools and the Boston Youth Services Network. Community Call has worked with over 75 community organizations, dozens of businesses, several government agencies and officials, and colleges. All of our programs rely on collaboration with those who have expertise on the issues or the ability to impact them.
 
We have worked with Harvard, Boston University, Fisher College, and Northeastern as community partners. The Boston Mayor's Office and his staff are also key partners for our programming.
 
Our YouthDOORSs program provides area business employee volunteers and expertise directly to our students from businesses and higher education institutions.
 
Liberty Mutual adopted our Homeless Youth program feedback and has awarded over $2 million to organizations supporting the recommendations in collaboration with Community Call and the Boston Youth Services Network.
 
Our vision is One Boston.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms Carolyn Edwards MS
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Call
Board Chair Term Jan 2012 - Dec 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Yasmin Charles Former Community Call Student Voting
Alex Cohen Boston University Voting
Erin Colman MBA State Street Bank Voting
Carolyn Edwards MS, PhD Candidate in Urban Education Community Call, Executive Director Voting
Gail Forbes-Harris Boston Public Schools Voting
Seana Fuller Charlestown High NonVoting
Daniel Malis JD Malis Law Voting
Howard Winokur MBA. CFA State Street Global Markets Currency Management Team Portfolio Manager Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Seanisha Blue Former Community Call Student NonVoting
Mekdelawit Deveie Boston Latin School NonVoting
Brooke Hilliard Boston Collegiate NonVoting
Eugene Johnson Former Community Call Student NonVoting
Jose Mendoza Former Community Call Student NonVoting
Alejandra Nunez -- NonVoting
Fiona Phie Community Call Student NonVoting
Jade Rivera Boston Collegiate NonVoting
Joseph Rowland -- --
Emnet Sisay Community Call Student NonVoting
Anny Thatch Fenway High School NonVoting
Eman Umalaya Boston Latin School NonVoting

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Monica Cannon Community Activist NonVoting
Veronica Clarke Tech Consultant NonVoting
Dave Crandall Google NonVoting
Shari Davis City of Boston Youth Engagement Office NonVoting
Cindy Diggs Youth Activist NonVoting
Stas Gayshan Cambridge Innovation Center NonVoting
Darrin Howell Political Organizer at 1199SEIU Massachusetts NonVoting
Nyell Jeudy Youth Outreach Worker NonVoting
Pam Julian League of Women Voters NonVoting
Roxanne Longoria Boston Youth Services Network NonVoting
Dave Rattigan Boston Globe NonVoting
Justin Springer President, Out of the Box Agency NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 85%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Audit
  • Youth

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Community Call has an active and engaged Board representing a diverse group of backgrounds, experience and perspectives. In addition, the organization has a Community Advisory Board that provides feedback on specific areas of expertise including activism, education, fundraising and technology. In 2016, Community Call developed it's first Youth Advisory Board consisting of current and former Community Call students to advise on programming, outreach, and to serve as Ambassadors of the organization in the community. These students present at Board meetings and external meetings on a regular basis.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $150,000.00
Projected Expense $150,000.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $205,053 $112,894 $136,683
Total Expenses $76,341 $128,349 $202,883

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $36,030 $72,532 $86,931
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $3,450 $2,294 $7,750
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- $2 --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $48,953 $38,066 $42,003
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $116,620 -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $51,748 $84,077 $133,849
Administration Expense $24,593 $40,675 $33,755
Fundraising Expense -- $3,597 $35,279
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 2.69 0.88 0.67
Program Expense/Total Expenses 68% 66% 66%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 3% 27%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $12,376 $12,629 $14,655
Current Assets $7,491 $9,176 $7,409
Long-Term Liabilities $1,048 $12,660 $37,087
Current Liabilities $7,160 $124,513 $86,657
Total Net Assets $4,168 $-124,544 $-109,089

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.05 0.07 0.09

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 8% 100% 253%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Community Call was started with personal interest free loans from the founder. These loans have been mostly paid back. In addition, the Board approved an annual salary for the Executive Director beginning in 2012 at the launch of the organization.  The majority of revenue since 2012 has gone directly into programming costs with insufficient funds to pay the Executive Director/programming instructor a regular or full salary. In 2016, the Executive Director donated back the accrued (on paper) but unpaid salary back to the organization to increase the sustainability and funding opportunities for the organization.
 
The Executive Director spends over 80% of their time providing direct programming services as the head instructor. Additional instructors have been utilized as contractors. There is also a Program Director who has worked with the organization for over a year, first as in intern and now as a contractor until funding is obtained. 
 
The 2016 fiscal year was spent focused on programming and strategic planning with a focus on 2017 fundraising.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Civic Engagement provides 21st century critical core skills including (excerpts from The Forum for Youth Investment (Out-of-School-Time Policy Commentary #8: Out-of-School Time and Civic Engagement. Washington, DC: The Forum for Youth Investment, Impact Strategies, Inc.): 

  • Social responsibility. A disposition towards acting responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind; demonstrating ethical behavior in a range of contexts.
  • Global awareness. Applying a range of skills and knowledge to understand and address global issues; and dialoguing and working collaboratively with individuals across cultures, religions and life styles.
  • Civic literacy. Exercising the rights and obligations of citizenship at all levels, from local to global; gaining skills to participate effectively in civic life, and understanding the implications of civic decisions.

POSITIVE IMPACT ON YOUTH
 
Civic engagement has been documented as having a positive impact on young people in four different respects:
  •  It can act as a gateway to future civic activism as participating youth are more likely to vote and to join community organizations fifteen years down the road.
  • It can lead to improved attitudes and behaviors related to school and work, as well as increases in academic achievement because students learn best when they are actively involved in understanding and helping to solve meaningful problems. Participation in real world problem solving increases engagement, responsibility and motivation; promotes the public purpose of learning; and improves work habits and skills. 
  • It can have a positive effect on interpersonal skills and social development through participation in decision-making roles including positive developmental outcomes with an increased belief in their own ability, their desire to help others and treat their peers kindly, helping their peers and appreciating cultural diversity.
  • It can decrease the likelihood of participation in risky behaviors with participants facing less than half the risk of pregnancy, school failure and suspension than similar students who do not participate. 
We provide experiential, student-centered, community engagement learning in a safe space for youth to discuss social issues impacting their lives and empower them to make an impact through community action projects they develop. Our program has a positive impact on students across academics, social engagement, behavior, and life skills. The students and the community benefit by incorporating individual student ideas with team building; concept development though critical thinking skills; and civic engagement by linking personal areas of interests with the broader community.
 
Students learn life and job readiness skills including:
  • Critical thinking
  • Time management
  • Emotion management
  • Communication
  • Interpersonal relationship
  • Problem solving
  • Teamwork
  • Brainstorming
  • Feedback receptivity
  • Flexibility
The Youth Experience Survey from the University of Illinois to survey high-school aged adolescents about their developmental experiences in an extracurricular activity or community-based program shows our students with significant growth in 46/48 of the YES measurements, significantly higher than the national results.
 
Our highest scores are on the following measurements indicating the program had a definitive impact on the student:
  • Tried a new way of acting around people
  • I do things here I don't get to do anywhere else
  • This activity has been positive turning point in my life
  • Learned about developing plans for solving a problem
  • Learned about setting priorities
  • Learned that working together requires compromise
  • Learned how my emotions and attitude affects others in the group
Our long term goals are to increase the number of students, locations, and issues that we impact across the neighborhoods of Boston and Greater Boston. Our vision is experiential, student centered civic engagement throughout Boston Public Schools and the Greater Boston area. 

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Our strategy and expected outcomes for both our students and the community include: 

  • More programming locations (schools and community) to increase our ability to reach more youth 
  • Working with Boston Public Schools to provide more experiential, student-centered learning within the schools
  • More youth programming cohorts (i.e. our MA Homeless Youth Task Force focused on homeless youth advocacy and YouthWOKE on the BPS racial climate) to unify youth with a common social issue interest
  • Increased formal leadership and job readiness programming incorporated in our programming to provide enrichment to the program to improve student outcomes
  • Increasing opportunity through collaboration with businesses and higher education for teaching, workshops, mentoring and networking for youth to open more doors of opportunity and improve youth outcomes
  • Development of a community-based, youth focused network to provide opportunity for deeper community engagement with other organizations serving at risk and opportunity youth
  • Continual development of events by youth on social issues that they care about to increase community impact
  • Increase in student skills and competencies to better prepare them for academics, career and life opportunities 
  • Increase in students feeling connected to their peers and the community because youth who are engaged statistically have better life outcomes
Community Call is currently in discussions with numerous community partners on collaboration opportunity including several community and four year colleges, other nonprofits, Boston Public Schools, the City of Boston, and agencies that work with court involved youth. We are also considering future options to work with middle-school youth and service area expansion.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

The Nellie Mae Educational Foundation has four key components for deeper learning outcomes through student-centered approaches to learning:

Learning is Personalized: Our students discuss their life experiences and perspectives to identify a social issue that resonates with the group to develop an event raising awareness and impacting the community.
 
Learning is Competency-Based: Our students range in age, backgrounds, ethnicity, and ability but are treated equally while participating in a level to meet their individual competency.
 
Learning Happens Anytime, Anywhere: Classes provide interaction with outside collaborators and resources providing opportunity for feedback, recommendations, and resources that expand beyond the classroom.
 
Students Take Ownership Over Their Learning: Socratic teaching solicits student input by stimulating discussion with decision-making managed by the students working as a team on a common goal.
 
We motivate and engage students by:
  • Providing a welcoming and positive environment to all students regardless of ethnicity, ability, or economic background where everyone is equal
  • Enhancing students’ self-confidence through affirmation, encouragement, and nurturing
  • Surveying students continually about their interests, likes and dislikes
  • Allowing students to work creatively, build peer relationships, and believe they are competent to reach their goals and obstacles are viewed as learning opportunities
  • Creating learning opportunities that are active, collaborative, and promote learning relationships with outside sources
  • Creating educational experiences that are challenging and enriching by extending student academic abilities with brainstorming, project management, team building, and other essential business and life skills
  • Developing behavioral skills to have positive interactions with peers and adults and a focus on re-engaging the disengaged
  • Providing a voice and the tools to students to know that they are valued and their voice matters
Our key partners are the Mayor's Youth Engagement Office, Boston Public Schools, and the Boston Youth Services Network (consisting of 21 youth organizations). Community Call has worked with over 75 community organizations to date, dozens of businesses, several government agencies and officials, and colleges. Every program relies on collaboration with those who have expertise on the issues or the ability to impact them. 
 
We have worked with Harvard, Boston University and Northeastern University on programming collaboration. Our corporate funders include many tech companies such as Google, Facebook, PegaSystems and TripAdvisor. We are now working with our corporate and higher education partners to increase our collaboration through YouthDoors and have already partnered with Microsoft on an event for youth at Boston City Hall.
 
The Mayor's Office and his staff have been key partners for our programming. Our work has been recognized by the Boston City Council, the Boston Youth Services Network, and Harvard University in partnership with the City of Boston. The combination of our programming, our collaborations, and the recognition of our efforts provide excellent opportunity for continued growth and success.
 
Community Call benefits from:
  • an outstanding reputation for youth development
  • an extensive network of community partners
  • a strong relationship with the City of Boston and Boston Public Schools
  • outcomes that benefit youth and the community
  • ability to provide a safe space for students regardless of background or ability
  • programming that provides meaningful and life changing experiences
Demand for our program in more schools, more communities, more issues, and more youth is unlimited. We are only restricted by what our funding can support.
 
 
 

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

We use pre/post surveys to measure qualitative & quantitative growth in our students to determine how to continually improve the program to meet their needs. The Youth Experience Survey from the University of Illinois measures growth in attitudes and skills including six conceptual domains of development: Identity, Work, Initiative, Basic Skills, Teamwork and Social Skills, Interpersonal Relationships, & Adult Networks. Most of our students show significant growth in 46/48 of the YES measurements, significantly higher than the national results.

We also measure success by: the number of locations and students served, our retention rate, the number of events produced, the number of community members we reach, and our ability to collaborate. Our goal is to reach more schools and more neighborhoods to get youth involved in experiential civic engagement.
 
Our progress will be evident through the acknowledgement of our programming success by our impact on students, the community, and through independent recognition of our contributions. 

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Our goal is to see experiential, student-centered, civic engagement in every school for every grade, and in every neighborhood.

Community Call programming has been very successful in terms of impact on students and the community. To assure that we could be sustainable and scalable, Community Call spent the first six months of 2016 focused on evaluating the strength and weaknesses of the organization. This evaluation confirmed our greatest strengths lie in the reputation of the program, the growth in our students, the contribution to the community, and our extensive network through collaboration. We are focusing on capitalizing on these strengths as we move to the next stage.
 
Through collaboration, the organization shares resources, opportunities, and serves a greater number (directly and indirectly) of youth and the larger community. We have worked with several collaborations including the Boston Youth Services Network, PIC and the Peace Collaborative which brings organizations together for the same goal of combining resources and serving more people.
 
Our YouthDOORS program provides collaboration to open doors for disadvantaged youth to expand learning outside the classroom through teaching, mentoring, and networking opportunities with professionals in education, business, and the Boston area community. YouthDOORS is an additional program to enhance the formal leadership and job readiness development of our students and outside youth with collaborating community resources. We are hoping to establish a youth advisory board dedicated to managing YouthDOORS programming to expand experiential learning to the youth through networking with businesses while supporting youth in the community.
 
Community Call is committed to our mission and to collaboration across the community to improve outcomes for youth and the community. We are only limited by our internal resources.