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Wounded Warrior Project Inc. - Boston Chapter

 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 300
 Jacksonville, FL 32256
[P] (877) 832-6997
[F] (904) 296-7347
http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org
keepintouch@woundedwarriorproject.org
Christy Smith
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INCORPORATED: 2005
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 20-2370934

LAST UPDATED: 12/07/2018
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) is to honor and empower wounded warriors. Our vision is to foster the most successful, well-adjusted generation of injured service members in our nation’s history. We fulfill our mission and strive to meet our vision by CONNECTING, SERVING, and EMPOWERING the wounded men and women who so bravely volunteered to serve our nation on or after the events of September 11, 2001.

We CONNECT warriors, their families, and caregivers to peers, programs, and communities to ensure they have a readily available network of support. We SERVE by providing free mental and physical health and wellness programs, career and benefits counseling, and by providing ongoing support for the most severely injured. We EMPOWER warriors to live life on their own terms, mentor fellow veterans and service members, and embody the WWP logo by carrying one another on a path toward recovery.

Mission Statement

The mission of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) is to honor and empower wounded warriors. Our vision is to foster the most successful, well-adjusted generation of injured service members in our nation’s history. We fulfill our mission and strive to meet our vision by CONNECTING, SERVING, and EMPOWERING the wounded men and women who so bravely volunteered to serve our nation on or after the events of September 11, 2001.

We CONNECT warriors, their families, and caregivers to peers, programs, and communities to ensure they have a readily available network of support. We SERVE by providing free mental and physical health and wellness programs, career and benefits counseling, and by providing ongoing support for the most severely injured. We EMPOWER warriors to live life on their own terms, mentor fellow veterans and service members, and embody the WWP logo by carrying one another on a path toward recovery.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2017 to Sept 30, 2018
Projected Income $260,000,000.00
Projected Expense $260,000,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Connection Programs
  • Financial Wellness Programs
  • Mental Health & Wellness Programs
  • Physical Health & Wellness

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) is to honor and empower wounded warriors. Our vision is to foster the most successful, well-adjusted generation of injured service members in our nation’s history. We fulfill our mission and strive to meet our vision by CONNECTING, SERVING, and EMPOWERING the wounded men and women who so bravely volunteered to serve our nation on or after the events of September 11, 2001.

We CONNECT warriors, their families, and caregivers to peers, programs, and communities to ensure they have a readily available network of support. We SERVE by providing free mental and physical health and wellness programs, career and benefits counseling, and by providing ongoing support for the most severely injured. We EMPOWER warriors to live life on their own terms, mentor fellow veterans and service members, and embody the WWP logo by carrying one another on a path toward recovery.


Background Statement

 

WWP began in 2003 when several veterans and friends, some severely injured in previous military conflicts, were moved by the stories of the first wounded service members returning home from Afghanistan and Iraq. This group decided something different needed to be done and took action. They wanted to provide tangible support to help those injured to heal both physically and mentally, and started packing backpacks with essential items not provided by hospitals. They delivered the first backpacks to Walter Reed Army Medical Center and were soon asked for more because of the positive impact they had on patients.

What these founders describe as “one wounded guy helping another” has evolved into America’s foremost advocate for those who return home with both the visible and invisible wounds of war. Over time, services provided by WWP have developed into a full-range support system, from the first days after injury to a warrior’s transition back into civilian life and beyond.

Today, more than 106,000 wounded warriors and 25,000 family support members and caregivers are registered with WWP and have access to free programs and services that CONNECT, SERVE, and EMPOWER.

 
 

Impact Statement

Since 2001, more than 2.7 million men and women have been deployed to protect our nation’s freedom. While more than 52,000 service members have been physically injured, the most prevalent wounds of the post-9/11 conflicts are those that cannot be seen. For example, an estimated 500,000 are living with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 360,000 have incurred a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Recent research from the Center for a New American Security suggests that the needs of this generation of wounded warriors are more complex than any we have faced in the past. The gap between their needs and what’s available from the government is substantial and growing.

Together, with the generous support of the American public, WWP will continue to provide free programs and services to wounded warriors, their families, and caregivers. WWP's mission is the same today as it was when the organization was founded, to honor and empower wounded warriors. WWP is here to fill gaps in service and take care of the warriors who raised their hands to step up on behalf of our great nation.

 

Needs Statement

 

Since 2001, more than 2.7 million men and women have been deployed to protect our nation’s freedom. While more than 52,000 service members have been physically injured, the most prevalent wounds of the post-9/11 conflicts are those that cannot be seen. For example, an estimated 500,000 are living with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 360,000 have incurred a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Recent research from the Center for a New American Security suggests that the needs of this generation of wounded warriors are more complex than any we have faced in the past. The gap between their needs and what’s available from the government is substantial and growing.

Together, with the generous support of the American public, WWP will continue to provide free programs and services to wounded warriors, their families, and caregivers. WWP's mission is the same today as it was when the organization was founded, to honor and empower wounded warriors. WWP is here to fill gaps in service and take care of the warriors who raised their hands to step up on behalf of our great nation.

 


CEO Statement

At Wounded Warrior Project, we have a renewed commitment to the over 112,000 wounded warriors and families we serve – supporting them as they heal, strengthen relationships, and live life to their fullest potential. Generous contributions from the American public in 2016 provided Wounded Warrior Project the distinct privilege to support those dreams through free programs and services. And for that, we are incredibly thankful. This year, we will continue to connect, serve, and empower the brave servicemen and women who’ve sacrificed so much for our great nation. We will increase investments in mental health care, helping wounded warriors living with the invisible wounds of war. We’ll continue to support the severely wounded, to connect warriors with their peers and communities, and to focus on independence and financial resiliency. We will increase partnerships and strengthen relationships with community-based organizations – because empowering this post-9/11 generation requires collaboration locally, regionally, and nationally. We’re so proud to work alongside like-minded nonprofits, for-profits, governmental agencies, and passionate individuals to create significant, life-changing impact for wounded warriors and their families. 2017 is going to be a year full of promise – and we have you to thank for it.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

National
Local

WWP’s national headquarters is located in Jacksonville, FL, supporting administrative and fundraising functions in addition to local programmatic efforts. Fifteen regional offices are located across the country and act as service centers, delivering programmatic services and support for warriors and their families in the local area and region. WWP also has dedicated field staff working in fourteen additional cities, including Boston, MA.

 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Human Services
  2. Human Services - Human Services
  3. Human Services - Human Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Connection Programs

During military service, warriors form bonds with one another that are as strong as family ties. WWP helps to reform those relationships by providing wounded warriors opportunities to connect with one another through community events and veteran support groups. We also provide easy access to local and national resources through outreach efforts and with the help of partners. Connection programs include:

  • Alumni Program
  • Peer Support
  • Resource Center
  • Operation Outreach
  • Community Partners
  • Policy & Government Affairs
Budget  $49,000,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Veterans
Program Short-Term Success 

We expect to see the following results from Connection Programs in FY2017:

  • More than 124,000 Connection program interactions will take place.
  • 85% will be satisfied with Engagement programs and services.
  • 75% will agree with the statement, "There are people who enjoy the same social activities that I do."
  • 80% will agree with the statement, "There are people I can depend on to help me if I really need it."
Program Long-Term Success 

We will foster a generation of warriors who are engaged and connected with each other, their families, and their communities.

Program Success Monitored By 

To measure the impact of our programs on wounded warriors and their families, WWP establishes key performance indicators (KPIs). Surveys and evaluations (including digital tools) are carefully planned and analyzed by an internal metrics team, along with process measures and counts tracked through a networked relationship management database (Salesforce). KPIs are monitored quarterly so course corrections can be made in a timely manner when necessary.

Examples of Program Success 

Program results from the most recently completed fiscal year (October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016) include:

  • 48,848 warriors and 17,654 family members participated in Alumni Program events. The satisfaction rate for these events was 94%.
  • More than 470 warriors and family members joined a Peer Support group with 82% reporting that participation positively impacted their life.
  • WWP staff made more than 96,000 wellness checks and outreach calls to warriors and family members through Operation Outreach.
  • The WWP Resource Center fielded 55,138 inbound calls and emails, resulting in a 90% customer satisfaction rate.

Financial Wellness Programs

Financial stability is the cornerstone of recovery. If a warrior isn’t financially stable, it’s nearly impossible for them to focus on anything else. WWP provides Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Department of Defense (DoD) benefits claims assistance to ease the transition to civilian life. We also provide career services to help warriors secure rewarding civilian careers and emergency financial assistance for warriors who encounter emergent situations. Programs include:

  • Warriors to Work
  • Benefits Service
  • Emergency Financial Assistance
Budget  $32,000,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Veterans
Program Short-Term Success 

We expect to see the following results from Economic Empowerment Programs in 2017:

  • More than 21,000 Economic Empowerment program interactions will take place.
  • 70% will retain employment for one year.
  • Employment earnings and benefits awarded will result in an economic impact of $131 million.
Program Long-Term Success  We will foster a generation of warriors who are financially empowered.
Program Success Monitored By 

To measure the impact of our programs on wounded warriors and their families, WWP establishes key performance indicators (KPIs). Surveys and evaluations (including digital tools) are carefully planned and analyzed by an internal metrics team, along with process measures and counts tracked through a networked relationship management database (Salesforce). KPIs are monitored quarterly so course corrections can be made in a timely manner when necessary.

Examples of Program Success 

Program results from the most recently completed fiscal year (October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016) include:

  • Benefit claims were finalized on 15,555 issues on behalf of warriors, resulting in an economic impact of $80.7 million.
  • 2,813 warriors and family support members were successfully placed into employment, resulting in an economic impact of $95.3 million.

Mental Health & Wellness Programs

This generation’s signature wounds of war can’t be seen. WWP supports warriors living with the invisible wounds of war at various stages in their readjustment to civilian life. Some may be in severe psychological distress while others may be further along in their road to recovery. To meet the unique and ever-evolving mental health needs of warriors, WWP has developed a Mental Health Continuum of Support. The Continuum is made up of six programs that address the individual needs of warriors no matter where they may be on their path to discover their “new normal.” Mental Health & Wellness programs include:

  • Inpatient Care
  • Warrior Care Network
  • Project Odyssey
  • WWP Talk
  • Outpatient Therapy
  • Independence Program
Budget  $85,000,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Veterans
Program Short-Term Success 

We expect to see the following results from Mental Health & Wellness programs in 2017:

  • More than 6,000 Mental Health & Wellness program interactions will take place.
  • 40% of participating warriors will improve by two points on the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (measurement of mental resiliency)
  • 40% of participating warriors will improve by two points on the Veteran Rand-12 Scale (measurement of quality of life)
Program Long-Term Success 

We will foster a generation of warriors who are building the resilience needed to overcome mental health challenges.

Program Success Monitored By 

To measure the impact of our programs on wounded warriors and their families, WWP establishes key performance indicators (KPIs). Surveys and evaluations (including digital tools) are carefully planned and analyzed by an internal metrics team, along with process measures and counts tracked through a networked relationship management database (Salesforce). KPIs are monitored quarterly so course corrections can be made in a timely manner when necessary.

Examples of Program Success 

Program results from the most recently completed fiscal year (October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016) include:

  • 2,898 warriors were served through the Combat Stress Recovery Program with 88% reporting they were satisfied with the mental health support they received.
  • Project Odyssey hosted 2,664 warriors and family support members; 97% of participants responded "Yes" when asked, "As a result of your experience at Project Odyssey, will you continue or will you seek out mental health support in the future?"
  • 1,003 warriors and family support members were served through WWP Talk with 91% of participants reporting they were satisfied with the support they received.

Physical Health & Wellness

When wounded warriors commit to making a positive change in their physical recovery, WWP is ready to help. Free goal-setting, coaching, skill-building, physical training, cycling, and other opportunities provide the resources warrior need to make long-term changes toward a healthy life. Physical Health & Wellness programs include:

  • Soldier Ride
  • PH&W Coaching Program
  • Physical Activity Sessions & Fitness Challenges
  • PH&W Online Education
  • Community Resources
Budget  $20,000,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Veterans
Program Short-Term Success 

We expect to see the following results from Body Programs in 2017:

  • More than 12,700 Body program interactions will take place.
  • 60% of participants will improve by two points on the Veteran Rand-12 Scale (scale used to measure quality of life)
  • 60% of participants will reduce their weight by five percent.
  • 60% of participants will increase the total number of workouts by two per week.
Program Long-Term Success 

We will foster a generation of warriors who are living active and health lives.

Program Success Monitored By 

To measure the impact of our programs on wounded warriors and their families, WWP establishes key performance indicators (KPIs). Surveys and evaluations (including digital tools) are carefully planned and analyzed by an internal metrics team, along with process measures and counts tracked through a networked relationship management database (Salesforce). KPIs are monitored quarterly so course corrections can be made in a timely manner when necessary.

Examples of Program Success 

Program results from the most recently completed fiscal year (October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016) include:

  • 13,397 warriors and 3,404 family members participated in a Physical Health & Wellness program; 98% say they will continue to seek out other sport or recreation opportunities in their community.
  • 1,610 warriors participated in Soldier Ride with 99% reporting they will continue to seek out cycling opportunities in the future.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Michael S. Linnington
CEO Term Start July 2016
CEO Email mlinnington@woundedwarriorproject.org
CEO Experience

Michael Linnington serves as chief executive officer of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP). He brings 35 years of military experience and leadership to the organization.

In this position, Michael oversees day-to-day operations and works with the executive team to set and implement the organization’s strategic vision. He is responsible for ensuring WWP’s free, direct programs and services continue to have the greatest possible impact on the warriors, caregivers, and families we serve.

“When our wounded veterans return home from combat, they rely on WWP and the organization’s dedicated team to provide necessary physical and mental health services, as well as economic empowerment and engagement programs,” says Michael. “Being part of an organization committed to this important mission is a sacred duty and solemn responsibility.”

Prior to joining WWP, Michael was the first permanent Director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), following his retirement as a Lieutenant General from the U.S. Army. He served as the Military Deputy to the Under Secretary of Defense (Personnel and Readiness) from 2013 to 2015 and as Commanding General, Military District of Washington and Commander, Joint Force Headquarters-National Capital Region from 2011 to 2013.

Michael also held general officer positions of responsibility as Deputy Commanding General, Fort Benning, Georgia; Commandant of Cadets, United States Military Academy, West Point, New York; and in Kabul, Afghanistan.

His military career included duties in key command and staff positions worldwide. He served on the Army Staff, the Joint Staff, and the Office of the Secretary of Defense’s Staff. His combat experience includes command of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, in support of both Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF).

Michael graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1980. He is married with two children.

Co-CEO Mr. Charlie Fletcher
Co-CEO Term Start Apr 2016
Co-CEO Email cwalker@woundedwarriorproject.org
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Gary Corless Chief Development Officer

 

As chief development officer of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP), Gary Corless is responsible for leading the fundraising, public awareness, and marketing teams. This includes the development and execution of strategic and diversified plans to grow and manage significant fundraising efforts. Gary also oversees the promotion and protection of the organization’s mission, vision, and purpose.

Before joining WWP, Gary was president and chief executive officer of PSS World Medical, concurrently serving on the company’s board of directors. From 2002 to 2010, his extensive career with PSS World Medical included serving as chief operating officer, executive vice president, and president of the Physician Business.

Gary worked with Gulf South Medical Supply, Inc. as president from 1999 to 2002 and with Eastern Region of Diagnostic Imaging, Inc. (a former subsidiary of PSS World Medical) as senior vice president from 1998 to 1999. Gary held various other leadership positions with PSS World Medical’s Physician Business between 1990 and 1998.

Gary holds a bachelor’s degree in finance from Florida State University. He lives in Jacksonville, Florida, with his wife, Ruby, and their four children.

 

Mr. Eric Miller Chief Financial Officer

 

Eric Miller serves as chief financial officer of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP). In this role, he is responsible for all WWP financial strategy and, in concert with the entire executive team, assists in the development and execution of the organization’s strategic plan.

Eric joined WWP in May 2015 as finance and accounting executive vice president, where he was responsible for leading the financial reporting, financial planning and analysis, accounting services, internal audit, and purchasing teams.

Prior to joining WWP, Eric spent the first six years of his career in the audit practice of Arthur Andersen in Miami, Florida. He later moved on to Columbia Laboratories where he spent the next seven years as corporate controller. More recently, Eric spent 15 years in a senior financial leadership role at PSS World Medical where he served as a strategic business partner to sales, marketing, and operations leadership.

Eric has also served as a volunteer coach for Special Olympics and other sports programs for physically and intellectually disabled children and adults.

Eric earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Florida State University. He lives in Jacksonville, Florida, with his wife, Susan, and their three kids, Kristine, Jake, and Ben.

 

Mrs. Jennifer Silva Chief Program Officer

 

Jennifer Silva serves as chief program officer of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP). In this role, she is responsible for providing strategic direction, management, and coordination for WWP programs and services.

Through the years, Jennifer has led the way in creating several new programs and business teams since joining WWP in 2008. Before taking on her current position, Jennifer led the strategy and innovation team, overseeing the creation of cutting-edge programs and development of business analytics and outcome measurements. Prior to this, she led the economic empowerment team, focusing on education and employment programs for wounded warriors and their families.

Jennifer first joined WWP as the director of the TRACK™ program and later served as program metrics and integration director, measuring the effectiveness and outcomes of all WWP programs.

Jennifer is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and served in the Army as a logistics officer. Before coming to WWP, Jennifer worked in the financial field, owned her own business, and was a secondary school educator.

 

Mr. Chris Toner Chief of Staff

Chris Toner serves as chief of staff for Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP). He works directly with the chief executive officer (CEO) to ensure effective and efficient relationships with internal and external stakeholders and to fulfill WWP’s commitments to warriors, partners, donors, and the board of directors.

Additionally, Chris prepares for and facilitates meetings critical to the successful path of WWP. He coordinates projects and commitments directly involving the CEO and his direct reports. He is also responsible for ensuring alignment among stakeholders, leading special CEO-initiated projects, and supporting the communication needs of the leadership team with the CEO.

Before joining WWP, Chris led the Army’s Warrior Care Program as the Commander of Warrior Transition Command and the Assistant Surgeon General for Warrior Care. His military career included combat experience in Afghanistan as the Chief of Staff, 101st Airborne Division; Commander of Task Force Duke, 3d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division; and the Commander of Task Force Catamount, 2d Battalion, 87th Infantry.

Chris graduated from Emporia State University in Kansas in 1987. He is married with three sons.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Best Nonprofit to Work For Nonprofit Times 2014
Brand of the Year: Veterans Association Harris Poll EquiTrend 2014
Best NonProfit to Work For NonProfit Times 2013
Brand of the Year: Disability Non-Profit Harris Poll EquiTrend 2013
Best NonProfit to Work For NonProfit Times 2012
Dole Leadership Prize Robert J Dole Institute of Politics 2012
National Charity of the Year Classy Awards 2012
Omar N. Bradley Spirit of Independence Award Independence Bowl 2012
Best NonProfit to Work For NonProfit Times 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2014

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

      

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 585
Number of Part Time Staff 7
Number of Volunteers 1,000
Number of Contract Staff 20
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Anthony K. Odierno
Board Chair Company Affiliation JP Morgan Chase
Board Chair Term Sept 2014 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Roger C Campbell BCG Partners, Inc. (Veteran) Voting
Mr. Justin Constantine Federal Bureau of Investigation (Disabled Veteran) Voting
Mrs. Cari DeSantis Melwood Voting
Mr. Ken Fisher Fisher House Foundation Voting
Mr. Jaun Garcia Amazon Voting
Mr. Richard Jones CBS (Veteran) Voting
Mr. Anthony K Odierno JP Morgan Chase (Disabled Veteran) Voting
Mr. Richard Tryon University of North Florida Voting
Mrs. Kathleen Widmer Johnson & Johnson Voting
Dr. Jonathan Woodson Boston University Medical Center Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 6
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 0
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • --
  • Compensation
  • Investment
  • Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2017 to Sept 30, 2018
Projected Income $260,000,000.00
Projected Expense $260,000,000.00
Form 990s

2016 WWP 990

2015 WWP 990

2014 WWP 990

2013 WWP 990

2012 WWP 990

2011 WWP 990

Audit Documents

2016 WWP Audited FInancials

2015 WWP Audited Financials

2014 WWP Audited Financials

2013 WWP Audited Financials

2012 WWP Audited Financials

2011 WWP Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $401,396,696 $483,868,695 $410,552,126
Total Expenses $365,176,434 $398,289,038 $300,279,601

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $311,000,949 $381,057,907 $315,343,282
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $20,037,321 $-3,199,931 $5,815,737
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $68,158,381 $104,095,155 $88,845,092
Other $2,200,045 $1,915,564 $548,015

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $275,750,082 $308,715,167 $242,145,985
Administration Expense $19,998,695 $89,573,871 $14,569,658
Fundraising Expense $69,427,657 -- $43,563,958
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.10 1.21 1.37
Program Expense/Total Expenses 76% 78% 81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 22% 0% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $429,924,584 $399,507,435 $307,165,370
Current Assets $413,268,779 $381,392,340 $290,062,163
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- $0
Current Liabilities $22,354,120 $28,157,233 $21,394,825
Total Net Assets $407,570,464 $371,350,202 $285,770,545

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $1,000,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 8.50

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 18.49 13.55 13.56

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials and reflects the national organization, which has a Boston Chapter. Contributions from Foundations and Corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?



3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?



5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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