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Resilient Coders Inc.

 50 Milk Street, 16th Floor
 Boston, MA 02109
[P] (617) 8502186
[F] --
http://resilientcoders.org
david@resilientcoders.org
David Delmar
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INCORPORATED: 2014
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 47-1882343

LAST UPDATED: 10/29/2018
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Resilient coders trains people of color from Boston’s low income communities for high growth careers as software engineers, and connects them with apprenticeship opportunities. Through our free nonprofit coding bootcamp, we teach more than the technical skills they need to be impossible to ignore; we present a path towards economic resiliency. We work with populations that have been systemically marginalized, because we see in these communities an untapped talent pool with the potential to drive the industry that powers the 21st century economy. We believe in social justice through economic empowerment, and in the opportunity for meritocracy in tech. This isn’t about one-off camps or hackathons. This is about meaningful change.

Mission Statement

Resilient coders trains people of color from Boston’s low income communities for high growth careers as software engineers, and connects them with apprenticeship opportunities. Through our free nonprofit coding bootcamp, we teach more than the technical skills they need to be impossible to ignore; we present a path towards economic resiliency. We work with populations that have been systemically marginalized, because we see in these communities an untapped talent pool with the potential to drive the industry that powers the 21st century economy. We believe in social justice through economic empowerment, and in the opportunity for meritocracy in tech. This isn’t about one-off camps or hackathons. This is about meaningful change.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Income $850,000.00
Projected Expense $838,820.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. Bootcamps (Top of funnel)
  • 2. Apprenticeship and Job Placement

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Resilient coders trains people of color from Boston’s low income communities for high growth careers as software engineers, and connects them with apprenticeship opportunities. Through our free nonprofit coding bootcamp, we teach more than the technical skills they need to be impossible to ignore; we present a path towards economic resiliency. We work with populations that have been systemically marginalized, because we see in these communities an untapped talent pool with the potential to drive the industry that powers the 21st century economy. We believe in social justice through economic empowerment, and in the opportunity for meritocracy in tech. This isn’t about one-off camps or hackathons. This is about meaningful change.


Background Statement

We offer our students a state-of-the-art training in software engineering, making them highly competitive job-seekers in Boston’s growing tech economy. To achieve this, we have developed our Bootcamp, a 14-week program during which students explore the coding skills necessary to become full stack software engineers. 

Resilient Coders started in 2014 when its Founder and Executive Director, David Delmar, was taking vacation days from his job at PayPal to give coding lessons to young men in a youth correctional facility. The idea stemmed from the observation that while the technology industry is celebrated as a meritocracy, it lacks in diversity and fails to address the problems faced by the most economically vulnerable among us. David quickly realized that the students he taught had the grit, intelligence and resourcefulness to be contributing members of the tech economy. Since then, Resilient Coders has grown to bring to light more talents that are too often ignored by our society by providing sustainable career opportunities to young adults of color and empowering them to bring change to their own communities. More about the philosophy behind Resilient Coders’ founding in an interview that David did recently with HOT 96.9: http://bit.ly/2tHlh6 

Impact Statement

Since starting in the summer of 2014, we have developed a strong 7-week Bootcamp program that teaches young adults how to code. We have launched Resilient Lab, the dev/design shop that employs our students, and designed the iPhone app for Wanderu, #1 for Travel in the app store when it launched. We are growing this revenue-generating business while also making more educational opportunities available for our youth. We are fortunate to have secured early funding from The Boston Foundation, the Boston Police Department, and from Tech Underwriting Greater Good (TUGG), among others.


Needs Statement

i. Referrals of young adults for Bootcamp, Resilient Coders’ coding program providing participants with relevant technology skills that can lead to tech careers.

ii. Internships and jobs for Bootcamp and Resilient Lab grads to provide them skill building opportunities and the opportunity to work alongside mentors.

iii. An investment to support our business development activities as we leverage the increasing demand for our talent to generate revenue based on our placement success rate.

CEO Statement

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMyv3txXaLc
 

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
Greater Boston Area

Organization Categories

  1. Employment - Job Training
  2. Education - Educational Services
  3. Youth Development - Youth Development-Business

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

1. Bootcamps (Top of funnel)

Resilient Coders’ multi-tiered program begins with a 14-week Bootcamp during which youth learn both basic coding skills as well as employability skills that will aid them in the workplace. By the end of the program every student has demonstrated proficiency in modern javascript by building full stack web applications with User Authentication, Express, Postgres, Jest, and React. They are also equipped with experience in Node, MongoDB, React Native, OOP, Algorithmic Thinking and have submitted too many PRs to count! 
Budget  $700,000
Category  Education, General/Other Education & Technology
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  At least 75 % graduation rate. Graduation signifies that we deem the student ready to be hired as a software developer in Boston, and has the tools to be successful in their jobs. 
Program Long-Term Success  Students will be ready to not only enter the job market, but also thrive as a software engineering. Having learned how to learn, they have developed the strategies that enable them to advance in their new careers, thus bringing resilience within their communities and diversifying the tech industry in Boston. 
Program Success Monitored By  Graduation rate. 
Examples of Program Success  Student has built a full-stack application that she showcases at Demo day in front of a room full of employers, and has passed our in-house technical interviews. 

2. Apprenticeship and Job Placement

Because we recognize that no instruction will be as effective as the learning that happens at that first job, we continue to provide support to our graduates through our apprenticeship model. For at least 4 months following the coding bootcamp, graduates are working on-site at a partner company and embark on “The Path.” This is our word for the journey that takes a fresh new engineer from novice to employee at the partner organization. Resilient Coders provides support through weekly check-ins with the student and the employer, as well as continued technical and professional development. We leverage an extensive network of mentors with whom we pair apprentices to help guide them in their learning journey.

Budget  $200,000
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Search & Placement
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  80% of graduates placed in apprenticeship opportunities. 
Program Long-Term Success  80% conversion rate for apprentices at partner companies. The goal is for the apprenticeship model to facilitate the development of mentorship and professional development processes at the partner companies, thus increasing the chances for the apprentice to be employed full time. 
Program Success Monitored By  Development of a skills matrix that defines success for the apprenticeship. Our role is to then conduct weekly check-ins with the employer and the apprentice, and provide continued learning to the apprentice. 
Examples of Program Success  We rolled out a pilot this program at the end of 2017. Out of the 6 students who went through the program, 2 of them were offered full time offers at the partner company, and 2 others found opportunities at other companies. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. David Delmar
CEO Term Start May 2014
CEO Email david@resilientcoders.org
CEO Experience David is a professional designer and interface developer with experience working with award-winning startups, as well as established brands. Before founding Resilient Coders, he was at PayPal, leading a cross-disciplinary team of designers and coders. They designed and built first-to-market digital advertising concepts for brands like Starbucks, Coke, FedEx, and Pepsi. He helped set up PayPal's startup incubator, Start Tank, and served as its UX subject matter expert.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Rouguiatou Diallo Chief of Staff As Resilient Coders’ Chief of Staff, Rouguiatou’s role consists of defining, communicating, and tracking the company’s progress towards strategic priorities. Before joining the Resilient Coders team, Rouguiatou worked as an analyst for the management consulting firm McKinsey & Company focusing on performance management and impact assessment in the social sector. She has lived and worked in Paris, Montreal, Brussels, and now Boston, where she brings an entrepreneurial spirit to her work and is driven by the idea of unlocking the potential of organizations and helping leaders accomplish and scale their vision. She holds a political science degree from McGill University.
Mr Leon Noel Managing Director of Engineering

Leon Noel, Managing Director of Engineering, is an internationally recognized software developer and entrepreneur. Before joining the Resilient Coders team, he co-founded SocialSci, a scientific surveying company relied on by over 4000 academic institutions and held an associate position at Harvard University. Besides his lecturing work at Harvard Business School, MIT Sloan School of Business, and General Assembly, Leon has also worked with major brands to help train their engineering teams and bring new technology to market. When not training our workforce, Leon oversees the development of future Resilient Coders by sitting on the advisory boards of both Urban Science Academy and Dearborn STEM.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 26
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 75%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Joshua Summers
Board Chair Company Affiliation clypd
Board Chair Term June 2015 - Dec 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Pamela Aldsworth Silicon Valley Bank Voting
Mr. David Delmar Resilient Coders Voting
Ms. Dunia Goncalves Everquote --
Mr David Mendels Brightcove --
Ms Nicole Stata Boston Seed Capital, LLC. --
Ms. Katie Stebbins Massachusetts Assistant Secretary for Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship --
Mr Frederick Townes Placester --
Ms. C.A. Webb Underscore.VC Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 5
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We are currently reshaping the structure of our board to better reflect and support our strategic needs as we grow.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Income $850,000.00
Projected Expense $838,820.00
Form 990s

2017 Form 990

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990EZ

Audit Documents

2017 Audit

2016 Review

2015 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $875,850 $438,919 $315,308
Total Expenses $583,652 $256,007 $104,076

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $25,000 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- $25,000 --
Individual Contributions $802,366 $386,547 $292,376
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $73,484 $27,372 $22,932
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $430,304 $170,176 $85,685
Administration Expense $53,460 $30,067 $9,556
Fundraising Expense $99,888 $55,764 $8,835
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.50 1.71 3.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses 74% 66% 82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 14% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $693,522 $410,315 $215,232
Current Assets $688,098 $403,227 $209,732
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- $0
Current Liabilities $7,180 $16,171 $4,000
Total Net Assets $686,342 $394,144 $211,232

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $0.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 4.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 95.84 24.94 52.43

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990. Resilient Coders Inc. is a newer organization and began its work in the summer of 2014, at which time it was fiscally sponsored by Third Sector New England Inc. The organization received its own nonprofit status, per the IRS, in May 2015, as reflected in the IRS Letter of Determination posted above.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Our value proposition is twofold:
 
1) we provide high quality local software engineers, trained on the most relevant technologies (React, Node, MongoDB) and ready to code on day one;
2) we give low-income students of color access to a career in software engineering through training, placement and support. Not only do we bridge the talent gap that tech companies experience in Boston, but we also, and mainly, respond to the urgent need for equity and diversity (racial, gender, and socio-economic) in the tech industry. Our growth is primarily dictated by the demand for our talent, our goal being to become a viable, and leading, pipeline for tech talent in the Boston area.
 

We aim to graduate 75% of our cohorts, 45 out of 60 students, that is 45 young software engineers of color who have the skills to be competitive job candidates for tech companies, 45 new thinkers and innovators in the tech industry. We hope to place at least 36 of these new engineers in our apprenticeship program, and convert 30 of them into full-time jobs. That is 50% of students coming into the program who will be employed in software engineering jobs. We, of course, will look at job retention rates at the 6 and 12 months marks. We are expecting all of our placed alumni to remain employed at those times. Though it might seem too ambitious, we believe the retention metric to be the real litmus test for our performance. Again, our goal is not to find just any job for our students, but to place them in sustainable, high growth ones and so we hold ourselves up to the highest standard.

 

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Resilient Coders' way of working is based on agile methodology, which is by nature iterative and encourages incremental improvements to a model or a product. In 2017, we learned a few lessons that led to changes in our model. 

First, we realized that our coders are held to a higher standard than their peers at for-profit bootcamps because they represent a higher risk to employers. As a response, we have decided to rise to the challenge and offer a more intensive program. The bootcamp increased in length from 8 to 14 weeks and includes an even deeper dive into Javascript. By graduation, our coders have each built multiple full-stack applications and have experience working with the most sought after technological frameworks and tools.
 
Second, we decided to double down on our employment efforts to smoothen the transition from bootcamp to employment by introducing our apprenticeship model. For at least 4 months following the coding bootcamp, graduates are working on-site at a partner company and embark on "The Path." This  is our word for the journey that takes a fresh engineer from novice to employee at a partner organization. Resilient Coders provides support through weekly check-ins with the student and employer, and provides continued learning to ensure that the apprentice is successful in his new job. 
 
Finally, we have three main approaches to increasing our employer networks and supporting our students.
 
1) We work closely with employers directly to ensure that we understand their needs, and to facilitate the development of our students on­site
 
2) We partner with employer associations to increase our reach within groups that are likely to hire our students but also to have higher level view of the trends in the market. For example, this year we have worked closely with the Ad Club, have met with recruiting groups and are now exploring a partnership with the local branch of the International Association of Microsoft Certified Partners.
 
3) We also partner with other community organizations that act as feeders into our program or provide additional support for our students.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

1. We have a network of professional engineers, who coach our students along.
 
2. We have experienced and dedicated staff.  Leon Noel, our Managing Director of Engineering and instructor, is an internationally recognized entrepreneur. Before joining Resilient Coders, he co-founded SocialSci, a scientific surveying company relied on by over 4000 academic institutions. Stephanie Castaños, Relationships Manager, was a program manager at Startup Institute. Muigai Unaka, Tech Lead, is an accomplished software engineer. Rouguiatou Diallo, Chief of Staff, has experience in impact assessment and performance management, through her work in management consulting. And David Delmar, Executive Director, is a prominent and visible member of the tech community who has worked with award-winning startups as well as established brands such as Paypal.
Race, culture, and immigrant background are particularly salient issues when it comes to our students and so it’s important for our staff to reflect the population we serve. Two of 5 our staff members grew up in Spanish speaking homes, 4 are second-generation immigrants, and all belong to minority groups.
 
3. We have a network of organizations that source our students and provide complementary support. We work closely with schools, correctional facilities, and partner organizations to provide more comprehensive support around each student.
 
4. We have a small but powerful board of influencers in the local tech community and non-profit world.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Our principal metric is the following: what is the share of students that we place in full time jobs? All other metrics must derive from this consideration which stands on two main levers:
 
1. Are we appropriately training our students to become capable coders?
 
On top of program completion and conversions to full time jobs, we welcome input from the community organizations with which we work, as they provide insight into the reasons why students may be unable to complete the program in a satisfactory manner. Regular meetings and exit interviews with key partners enables us to have a well-rounded view on the difficulties they may face. By knowing the root cause of their problem, we can provide tailored solutions.
 
2. Are we answering the needs of employers and the technology industry at large?
 
Feedback from employers and the technology sector is essential in ensuring that our curriculum remains relevant. We therefore maintain open channels of communication with employers once they have recruited our students. We are systematizing this process by having weekly check-ins with our employers,
when appropriate, to discuss the advancement of their new recruits during their internships or in the first few months of their work engagement. That way, we are able to pick up on broad needs for change but also on more subtle, day-to-day, and sometimes company specific pain points.
 
For both legs of this evaluation process we maintain a “bullseye” type of view on our performance targets. We consistently update our assumptions by openly communicating with the communities we are serving.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

We have been iterating on our bootcamp model since 2016. During the 2016-17 period, our placement rates were in the 40% to 50% range. However, since then we have improved our curriculum to better fit the needs of local employers, have developed a comprehensive employer engagement strategy, and have better embedded ourselves in the region’s workforce development landscape. Our most recent cohort had a 83% placement rate into temp to perm software engineering positions spanning big financial companies, to small start ups. The bet we made is working, we have momentum and are looking to transform these early successes into lasting progress.
 
We have reached the tipping point for our organization ­­ that is the moment, when demand for the tech talent we are producing is starting to outstrip supply. And therefore, we believe this is the right time to implement a fee for service strategy. Our goal is for our revenue growth in the next few years to be spearheaded by earned income. To fully explore and develop our clientele as well as the price and sales strategies available to us, it is imperative that we switch from fundraising to business operations.