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The Fatherhood Project, fiscally sponsored by Massachusetts General Hospital

 15 Parkman Street, Wang 815
 Boston, MA 02114
[P] (617) 724-2044
[F] (617) 726-7661
http://www.thefatherhoodproject.org
rlevy2@partners.org
Raymond Levy
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INCORPORATED: 2013
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-1564655

LAST UPDATED: 03/17/2017
Organization DBA The Fatherhood Project
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Our mission is to improve the health and well-being of children and families by empowering fathers to be knowledgeable, active, and emotionally engaged with their children.

Mission Statement

Our mission is to improve the health and well-being of children and families by empowering fathers to be knowledgeable, active, and emotionally engaged with their children.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2016 to Sept 30, 2017
Projected Income $495,000.00
Projected Expense $492,163.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Dads in Recovery
  • Divorcing Dads: From Disruption to Connection
  • Teen Dads
  • The Dads Matter Initiative: Obstetrics
  • The Dads Matter Initiative: Pediatrics

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Our mission is to improve the health and well-being of children and families by empowering fathers to be knowledgeable, active, and emotionally engaged with their children.

Background Statement

Founded in 2012 by Raymond Levy, PsyD, TFP is a unique father engagement organization in that its research is integrated into and informs both programming and evaluation.

As a clinical psychologist, Dr. Levy has long believed that a critical tool in ending the cycle of poverty and violence plaguing many communities is strengthening the connections between fathers and children. Through his research and clinical experience, he recognized that many fathers, especially those in underserved populations, lacked the skills necessary to be successful parents. He founded TFP to address this issue through evidence-based interventions.

In 2013, he hired John Badalament, an educator and leader in the fatherhood field, as Program Director. Together, they developed an evidence-based psycho-educational fathering intervention, grounded in recent brain development research that supports, educates and builds skills. TFP piloted this versatile curriculum, Fathering Across the Life Course, in local prisons, urban high schools, addiction recovery groups and community centers.

In 2014, Dr. Levy met Milton Kotelchuck, PhD, another fatherhood pioneer. Dr. Kotelchuck’s research demonstrated the importance of a father’s preconception health and prenatal involvement for a child’s positive health and emotional outcomes. With the goal of establishing a more engaging, father-friendly approach to prenatal care, Drs. Levy and Kotelchuck developed a groundbreaking Father Survey that measures men’s experiences of impending fatherhood and identifies what they need to become confident, competent caregivers.

Embedded within the MGH Department of Psychiatry, TFP is responsible for raising its own operating funds. TFP has created its own mission statement, recruited and developed its staff, devised a comprehensive strategic plan and budget and cultivated an Advisory Board of experts capable of providing or facilitating funding. TFP receives no funding from MGH and, in fact, pays MGH a percentage of its expenses for accounting, human resources, legal, IT, security and facilities maintenance. MGH established a separate cost center for TFP and assigned it an individual fund number to track revenue and expenses.

Armed with the knowledge gained from research, curriculum development and program pilots, TFP is entering a phase of growth that will include hiring new staff, refining and systematizing programming, and diversifying its funding stream.


Impact Statement

TFP’s accomplishments over the last year include:

1. Developing Dads in Recovery, a program that brings the Fathering Across the Life Course curriculum to fathers recovering from drug addiction.

2. Administering a ground-breaking Father Survey to approximately 900 men attending prenatal appointments at MGH in Boston and MGH Chelsea and Revere HealthCare Centers, and presenting the findings at national conferences.

3. Establishing a Fatherhood Task Force with staff at MGH Vincent Obstetrics to develop interventions for expectant and new fathers based upon the findings from the Father Survey.

4. Cultivating an engaged Advisory Board comprised of legal, medical and business professionals to help guide program expansion and facilitate funding.

5. Adding a Research Fellow to the staff to improve program evaluation and enhance independent research.

TFP’s top goals for the current year are to:

1. Expand the Dads Matter Initiative (Pediatrics and Obstetrics), currently only offered in Revere, to MGH Chelsea HealthCare Center’s Departments of Obstetrics and Pediatrics.

2. Reach more underserved, at-risk fathers with our Dads Matter Initiative, Dads in Recovery and Teen Dads programs by partnering with new organizations and hospitals.

3. Complete implementation of interventions for expectant and new fathers developed by the Fatherhood Task Force at MGH Chelsea HealthCare Center and MGH Vincent Obstetrics to reach between 60-100 men per week.

4. Add a new program staff member to support more direct service programming.

5. Cultivate a larger donor base to raise funds to continue TFP’s strategic growth and expand its reach.


Needs Statement

The Fatherhood Project's most pressing needs include the following:

1. Raising the funds necessary to meet the 5-year operational needs of the organization, a total of approximately $2.8 million.

2. Adding at least one program staff member ($80,000-90,000) to support continued growth.

3. Systemization of outcome data collection and analysis in preparation to scale programming.

4. Developing a strong donor base to support our expanding programs and research initiatives.

5. Increasing awareness of TFP’s work and the importance of father engagement for positive child outcomes to foster new collaboration opportunities and reach more fathers.


CEO Statement

As a clinical psychologist, I’ve long been aware of the critical need for strong connections between fathers and children. Findings from the rapidly growing science of early child brain development show the positive, lifelong impact fathers have by being engaged early in their children’s lives, including:

Educational Outcomes: (a) increased cognitive competence; (b) higher grade completion and income; (c) higher math competence in girls; (d) greater verbal strength in boys and girls; (e) children are twice as likely to enter college or find stable employment;

Emotional Outcomes: (a) more internal locus of control; (b) better problem-solving competence and stress tolerance; (c) greater empathy, moral sensitivity; (d) reduced gender stereotyping;

Behavioral Outcomes: (a) delay in initial sexual activity; (b) reduced teen pregnancy; (c) less reliance on aggressive conflict resolution; (d) fewer juvenile offenses; (e) reduced rate of subsequent divorce.

Studies also show that men who have warm, nurturing relationships with their children are physically healthier, less depressed and more successful in their marriages and careers. In other words, an emotionally close father-child relationship not only serves as a significant protective factor against high-risk behaviors in children, but is also a source of health for the entire family.

Yet, more children than ever are growing up without a father in their lives.

According to a Pew Research Center analysis, more than 25% of fathers with children aged 18 years or younger live apart from their children. Nearly 1/3 of such fathers report communicating with their children less than once a month, and 27% say they have not seen their children at all in the past year.

In order to empower fathers to be knowledgeable, active, and emotionally engaged with their children and families, TFP:

 

  • Provides direct-service programs that strengthen emotional connections between fathers and children, focus on skill-building, and empower fathers, with special focus on underserved populations.
  • Trains professionals in healthcare, education, and social services about the critical role fathers play in child development, and how to best support father engagement in their particular context.
  • Initiates its own research with leading researchers to scientifically validate interventions, inform program and training development, and advance knowledge in our field.

 

We believe that fathers change the world, and are proud to be evidencing leadership in the fatherhood field.

Raymond Levy, PsyD


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Based in Boston, The Fatherhood Project at Mass General serves patients from throughout Eastern Massachusetts and reaches fathers who visit Obstetrics and Pediatric specialties at MGH, low-income communities on the north side of Boston, and in Mass General's community health centers  located in Charlestown and Revere, MA.

Organization Categories

  1. Health Care - Health Support
  2. Human Services -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Dads in Recovery

Addiction damages family relationships, leaving fathers with a negative or nonexistent relationship with their children and destructive shame and guilt. Disengagement negatively impacts a father’s mental health and his children’s ability to reach positive behavioral, emotional and academic outcomes, fueling a multi-generational cycle of parental abandonment and substance abuse.

TFP’s innovative program provides fathers in substance use treatment a chance to reconnect with their children and parent effectively, leading to a sense of pride and a powerful reason to remain sober. By providing fathers with psycho-educational counseling that supports their recovery, this program helps them:
  • Establish or repair their relationship with their children
  • Parent with increased skills, leading to confidence and competence
  • Understand aspects of child development
  • Learn about activities and interactions that build brain development and address the emotional and practical requirements of parenting.
Budget  $34,894.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family Preservation
Population Served Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers Males Families
Program Short-Term Success 

TFP’s short term goal is for 70% of participants to show improvement on following five validated measures at the completion of the program:

1. Emotional and physical closeness: measured with the 15-item Child-Parent Relationship Scale

2. Responsiveness: measured with the 10-item Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale

3. Confidence and competence: measured with the 17-item Fathering Self-Efficacy Scale

4. Parental Empathy; measured with the 21-item Interpersonal Reactivity Index-Parental Empathy

5. Self-Efficacy to abstain from drug use: measures with the 20-item Alcohol and Drug Abstinence Self-Efficacy Scale

Program Long-Term Success 

All residential treatment programs, halfway houses and outpatient treatment clinics nationwide will provide supportive fatherhood interventions, giving more men a chance at positive reconnection with their children and thus helping address the cycles of substance abuse, poverty and violence plaguing this population.

Program Success Monitored By 

TFP will use several tools to measure the outcomes described above:

1. The Child-Parent Relationship Scale, Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale, Fathering Self-Efficacy Scale, Interpersonal Reactivity Index-Parental Empathy Scale and Alcohol and Drug Abstinence Self-Efficacy Scale: all five scales will be administered at the first class and again at the final (eighth) class.

2. Staff observation and reports: fathers and their co-parents self-report improvements in father-child relationships during and after the program to TFP’s Program Director.

3. Satisfaction Survey: to measure participants’ feelings about the program, will be completed at the end.

Examples of Program Success 

TFP did not use the measures described above during the pilot session of Dads in Recovery. However, the experience of two participants, Steve and Brian, demonstrate the transformative impact of the program.

Steve experienced such overwhelming feelings of guilt and low self-esteem even thinking about fatherhood that he almost did not join the program. As the program progressed, however, he had an epiphany. “When we were doing the activities and started talking about the idea of my fathering legacy, I had a physical reaction. I realized that I could leave a different legacy for my kids.” At the end, Steve reported that he would be seeing his children for the first time in 6 months because he applied what he learned about co-parenting at a court mandated meeting with his ex-wife.

Brian also used a technique that he learned in the program to reconnect with his estranged daughter. He began writing to her and noted that he would not have had the courage to reach out without the program.


Divorcing Dads: From Disruption to Connection

Research shows that for a variety of reasons, divorcing fathers risk losing their relationship with their children. The upheaval of divorce also increases the risk of damaging stress for children. Divorcing Dads: From Disruption to Connection is a research-based program that addresses the emotional and practical aspects of fathering through all stages of divorce. In an interactive group setting, fathers:

  • Gain skills necessary for relating to their children during and after divorce.
  • Learn strategies for minimizing conflict with their former spouse or partner.
  • Discover insights from other fathers’ stories and circumstances similar to their own.

The program’s focus is the development of fathering skills that serve all members of the family, including estranged spouses. It is intended to promote positive interactions between co-parents, address the emotional and practical requirements of parenting and teach skills to help fathers feel competent and confident with their children.

Budget  $46,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family Preservation
Population Served At-Risk Populations Males Families
Program Short-Term Success 

TFP’s short term goals for Divorcing Dads are:

1. Offer six sessions of the program per year.

2. When comparing pre-and post TFP questionnaires, after 8 classes, 80% of the men will understand optimal co-parenting techniques, the critical importance of remaining emotionally engaged with their children and the meaning and significance of “the best interest of the child”.

Program Long-Term Success 

Divorcing Dads will be disseminated through conference presentations and speaking engagements in an attempt to increase teaching and support to fathers involved in the process of divorce. TFP’s long term goal is for non-resident fathers to recognize their importance in lives of their children and seize the opportunity to remain engaged to the benefit of everyone in the family. Ideally, the national statistic of children who do not see their fathers on a regular basis post-divorce would decrease.

Program Success Monitored By 

TFP will use several tools to measure the outcomes described above:

1. The Child-Parent Relationship Scale, Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale, Fathering Self-Efficacy Scale and Interpersonal Reactivity Index-Parental Empathy Scale: all four scales will be administered at the first class and again at the final (eighth) class.

2. Staff observation and reports: fathers and their co-parents self-report improvements in father-child relationships during and after the program to TFP’s Executive Director.

3. Satisfaction Survey: to measure participants’ feelings about the program, will be completed at the end.

Examples of Program Success 

TFP did not utilize the measurement protocol outlined above during the 2015-2016 pilot sessions of Divorcing Dads. Participant feedback has, however, been uniformly positive. One participant stated:

“As one who is just starting the divorce process, being in a class with men who were farther along was incredibly helpful on several levels. It helped me understand some of the ways in which divorce might affect my kids, ways to fortify my relationship with them during the process and the importance of working with my spouse to minimize any negative impact on our children. The class and the leaders were excellent.”

Another noted, "understanding what other fathers are dealing with in their divorce and parenting situations really helped me to put my experience in perspective. I came out of the class more confident that I am doing the right things to strengthen my relationship with my kids."


Teen Dads

Teen fathers are more likely to be low-income and less likely than adult fathers to know about basic childcare or understand developmental milestones. Their risk of disengagement is particularly acute – more than half do not live with their children. All this compounds their children’s risk for negative outcomes.

TFP’s program provides expecting and parenting teen dads - often referred to as ‘the forgotten parent’ - with the support, skills and resources necessary to improve their outcomes and those of their children. TFP’s group model provides them with a safe, educational and positive environment to interact with peers in similar circumstances while learning how to understand and connect with their children and parent and co-parent effectively.
 
Emphasizing competence, confidence and connection, the program integrates brain science research with skill building exercises and practical tools through teaching, discussion, videos, interactive exercises, and reflection.
Budget  $17,802.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family Services for Adolescent Parents
Population Served At-Risk Populations Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Males
Program Short-Term Success 

TFP’s short term goal is for 70% of participants to show improvement on following four validated measures at the completion of the program:

1. Emotional and physical closeness: measured with the 15-item Child-Parent Relationship Scale

2. Responsiveness: measured with the 10-item Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale

3. Confidence and competence: measured with the 17-item Fathering Self-Efficacy Scale

4. Parental Empathy; measured with the 21-item Interpersonal Reactivity Index-Parental Empathy.

Program Long-Term Success 

TFP’s long term goal would be to reach 50% of teen fathers in Massachusetts and give them hope, the tools to engage with their children, hope and a sense of mission in the world through fatherhood. Eventually, TFP plans to scale the program for national dissemination as an important tool in a multidisciplinary, coordinated approach to address the cycles of substance abuse, poverty and violence plaguing our most vulnerable populations.

Program Success Monitored By 

TFP will use several tools to measure the outcomes described above:

1. The Child-Parent Relationship Scale, Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale, Fathering Self-Efficacy Scale and Interpersonal Reactivity Index-Parental Empathy Scale: all four scales will be administered at the first class and again at the final (eighth) class.

2. Staff observation and reports: fathers and their co-parents self-report improvements in father-child relationships during and after the program to TFP’s Program Director.
 
3. Satisfaction Survey: to measure participants’ feelings about the program, will be completed at the end.
Examples of Program Success 

TFP did not utilize the measures described above during the pilot sessions of Teen Dads. Participants and partners, however, provided insightful and positive feedback. One18-year old with twin infant daughters said, “I appreciate being here and having a place to come to get advice, and be listened to…otherwise I would keep it all inside because I don’t have anyone else I can talk with about fatherhood.” Another young man reported that he “learned how to be a better father and to better communicate with my significant other. Hearing that other guys have the same issues as we do really helps.”

Finally, a site coordinator at a partner school indicated that the program is a “great resource” for young fathers, stating “[o]ur young dads were able to recognize how important they are in their children's lives and to think about what kind of dad they want to be.”


The Dads Matter Initiative: Obstetrics

TFP developed Dads Matter Obstetrics to meet the needs identified by 900 expectant fathers who responded to the Father Survey. The survey probed the men’s physical and mental health, feelings on becoming fathers, need for fathering education and support and prenatal visit experience.

To address the issues raised by the survey, TFP created a Fatherhood Task Force with MGH obstetrics professionals. The Task Force designed interventions to improve fathers’ contribution to a healthy pregnancy and birth and help them recognize and respond to their child’s needs, become a supportive co-parent and improve their own health.

These interventions became the cornerstone of Dads Matter Obstetrics, and include

  • Informative trimester-based booklets for dads
  • Educational weekly text messages
  • Evaluation and referral services for dads dealing with depression, obesity, smoking and drugs and
  • Training on the importance of fathers to families and specific techniques for creating a father-friendly practice.
Budget  $49,895.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family Preservation
Population Served Males Families At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

 

TFP’s short term goals for Dads Matter Obstetrics are:

1. Complete program development and launch in the obstetrics departments of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH Boston) and MGH Chelsea HealthCare Center (MGH Chelsea) by December of 2017.
2. Once the program is established, engage 60% (120 per week) of the men attending prenatal appointments with educational texts, online vidscripts, and trimester-based booklets.
3. Conduct two workshops at MGH Chelsea and two workshops at MGH Boston to train obstetrics staff to make office visits and services more father-friendly.
4. Revise standard protocol for obstetrical nurses initial contact with mother to include a discussion of the importance of early father engagement, how the staff at the practice values father engagement and to encourage her to bring the father to all prenatal appointments.
5. Establish screening, evaluation and referral protocol MGH Chelsea and MGH Boston for expectant fathers for depression, obesity, smoking and drug use.
Program Long-Term Success 

TFP’s goal is create a national organization to educate the medical community on the importance of early father engagement and standardize support for expectant fathers at obstetrics practices nationwide. This support would include interventions to improve both fathers’ engagement with and understanding of their children as well as their physical and mental health.

Program Success Monitored By 

TFP will track the number of fathers choosing each intervention and develop and administer program evaluation questionnaires. TFP also will continue to administer Father Surveys at MGH Boston and MGH Chelsea, part of which will include fathers’ evaluation of their experience at prenatal appointments and interaction with obstetrics staff.

Examples of Program Success 

TFP has not yet piloted Dads Matter Obstetrics and therefore has, as yet, no data. However, the obstetrics staff at MGH Boston has been very enthusiastic about engaging fathers during the prenatal period and implementing father-friendly interventions in their practice. They meet monthly with members of TFP as part of The Fatherhood Task Force and have already begun encouraging expectant mothers to bring the father to all prenatal appointments.

TFP is just beginning to work with the OB staff at MGH Chelsea, but the program has been met with similar enthusiasm. They are excited for the upcoming staff trainings and the father-friendly interventions.


The Dads Matter Initiative: Pediatrics

Dads Matter Pediatrics is an innovative initiative that combines direct service and training for healthcare professionals to educate and engage underserved fathers and improve outcomes for vulnerable children and families.

Direct service: TFP’s Dads & Kids Connect group, designed to increase men’s sense of confidence and competence as fathers of young children, incorporates:
  • Unstructured, free play and social interaction.
  • Structured relationship-building activities for dads and kids.
  • A 30-minute pullout session utilizing TFP’s innovative psycho-educational curriculum. Topics include: healthy attachment and the developing brain, positive discipline, and successful co-parenting.

Training: Through a combination of full staff and program-level consultations, TFP increase awareness of fathers as valued, capable caretakers who play a critical role in child and family health. Practitioners learn how to create an atmosphere that welcomes and engage fathers in all aspects of family care.

Budget  $44,621.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family Preservation
Population Served Males Families Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

TFP has identified four interrelated outcomes for Dads Matter Pediatrics. By the end of 14 classes, 70% of the men in this program will show improvement on four validated measures:

1. Emotional and physical closeness: measured with the 15-item Child-Parent Relationship Scale (CPRS)

2. Responsiveness: measured with the 10-item Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale (IM-P)

3. Confidence and competence: measured with the 17-item Fathering Self-Efficacy Scale

4. Parental Empathy; measured with the 21-item Interpersonal Reactivity Index-Parental Empathy (IRI-PE).
Program Long-Term Success 

TFP’s long term goals for the Dads Matter Pediatrics are:

1. All US pediatric practices and their complementary programs (WIC, Home Visiting, Healthy Steps, etc.). recognize the critical importance of fathers for children’s wellbeing

2. Evaluating and support the health of the entire family is the standard practice at pediatric services nationwide, as well as in their complementary programs.

3. Pediatricians and programs such as Healthy Families, and Parents as Teachers will all refer men at-risk of disengagement from their children to educational fatherhood and support services.

Program Success Monitored By 

TFP will use several tools to measure the outcomes described above:

1. The Child-Parent Relationship Scale, Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale, Fathering Self-Efficacy Scale and Interpersonal Reactivity Index-Parental Empathy Scale: all four scales will be administered at the first class and again at the final (fourteenth) class.

2. Staff observation and reports: fathers and their co-parents self-report improvements in father-child relationships during and after the program to TFP’s Program Director.

3. Satisfaction Survey: to measure participants’ feelings about the program, will be completed at the end.
Examples of Program Success 

TFP did not utilize the measurement protocol outlined above during the 2015-2016 pilot session of Dads Matter Pediatrics but received very positive feedback from physicians and participating families. In fact, the demand for the program was so great that TFP added an additional Dads & Kids Connect group in the fall of 2015.

The spouse of one participant noted: “[t]he dads group actually impacted their relationship as a father and son.…since joining the group he has realized the importance of how he needs to be with his son more without me being present.” Another spouse remarked “[s]ince he started the program he has been much more attentive to our child’s needs. He’s tuned-in in a way he wasn’t before.” A pediatric resident recognized that the topic of father engagement is “not often discussed” and stated that he “really enjoyed the chance to share our experiences of dads in the different clinics. The practical suggestions will help me do a better job of engaging dads in office visits.”

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Each of our programs utilize our unique Fathering Across the Life Course curriculum, an evidence based psycho-educational intervention that integrates brain science research with skill building exercises and practical tools. The curriculum combines teaching, discussion, videos, interactive exercises, out-of-session “homework” and reflection, and addresses the following concepts:
  1. Vision: Being intentional as a father, having a clear vision, and taking steps toward realizing that vision each and every day.
  2. Legacy: How a father’s relationship with his biological father affects the fulfillment of the Dad’s Vision Statement. How beliefs and understandings about parenting have been shaped by the culture that fathers grew up in and around.
  3. Foundations For An Emotionally Close Relationship: How children’s needs change as they grow and basic concepts of child development. The importance of presence, empathic listening, attention, affection, play and building healthy self-esteem.
  4. Attachment: Secure attachment is critical for children’s development. Fathers learn about brain architecture, the importance of being able to understand their infant’s and child’s emotional needs and developmental milestones.
  5. Authoritative Parenting: Authoritative parenting (giving choices) is a moderate approach to parenting that emphasizes setting high standards, being warm/nurturing, responsive and involved, and respecting children as independent, rational beings.
  6. Co-parenting: The concepts of “Relationship as Practice”: ongoing harmony-disharmony-repair and “Parenting On The Same Page”: agreements about parenting that co-parents continuously negotiate while following the best interest of the child.
  7. Stress, Support and Health: Healthy vs. non-healthy support, three kinds of stress (Positive, Tolerable and Toxic) and how they impact both father and child. Fathers learn practical stress management ideas and practices, as well as how supportive, healthy relationships are critical to reducing their own stress.
We have tested the curriculum with inmates, teens, recent immigrants, low-income men, recovering substance users and divorcing fathers.
 
TFP also teaches social workers, therapists, educators, early education providers and child development specialists how to better engage, equip and support fathers. Our training reviews the latest research on the impact of father involvement on early brain development, offers practical strategies and provides take-away actionable tools to start or enhance a father-involvement program in any education or human service setting.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Raymond A. Levy
CEO Term Start Jan 2013
CEO Email rlevy2@partners.org
CEO Experience

Dr. Ray Levy is Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and has 33 years of clinical experience working with men and fathers. Dr. Levy founded The Fatherhood Project to continue his clinical work, to develop programs that teach fathers key relationship skills to raise healthy children, and to educate parents & professionals about the critical role fathers play in children’s lives. He is also the Principal Investigator for the project research on the specific importance of good fathering for positive outcomes in children’s lives. In June, 2012, he attended the White House’s Champions of Change Father’s Day meeting with other national leaders.

Dr. Levy teaches and supervises within the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and is the senior editor of a book series demonstrating the evidence base for psychodynamic psychotherapy. Dr. Levy’s books include the Handbook of Evidence-Based Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (2009) and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: Evidence-Based Practice and Practice-Based Evidence (2011). Dr. Levy has taught and trained professionals domestically and internationally.

Dr. Levy is on the Board of Directors of Adoptions with Love, a Massachusetts private, non-profit domestic adoption agency. He also serves on the Advisory Board of Manitou Experience, a one-week Bereavement Camp for boys who have suffered the death of a parent or sibling. He also serves on the Board of Directors of the Massachusetts General Hospital Endowment for the Advancement of Psychotherapy.

Dr. Levy recently accepted a position on the Academic Advisory Board at Children’s Health Watch, a multi-site organization of academic researchers who design and implement research aimed at influencing political policy related to concerns about poverty. CHW is headquartered in Boston, with additional sites in Philadelphia, Baltimore, Little Rock, and Minneapolis.

Dr. Levy has raised a son and a daughter and has made his experience of fathering a central part of his life.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. John Badalament DIrector of Programs --
Ms. Jennifer Doherty Director of Online Communications --
Dr. Milton Kotelchuck Director of Research --
Dr. Raymond A. Levy Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- Massachusetts Department of Children and Families 2014

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

The Fatherhood Project has collaborated with several Massachusetts organizations to impact as many families as possible with our programs. Previous and current collaborations include:

  • Dads Matter Initiative with MGH Vincent Obstetrics, and MGH Chelsea and Revere HealthCare Centers Departments of Obstetrics and Pediatrics
  • Teen Dads program with UTEC Lowell, Haverhill Area Healthy Families, Boston English High School and other Boston area schools
  • Dads in Recovery with the Reclamation Center in Lowell, the MA Department of Revenue Child Support Enforcement Division, and the Link House Residential Treatment program
  • Training for educators, social workers, and community organizations at National Head Start Association, Boys and Girls Club, ABCD Mattapan Head Start, and several area schools.
  • Research on fathers’ impact on childhood obesity prevention with the Harvard School of Public Health

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 2
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? No
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Karen Maloney
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Board Chair Term Sept 2016 - Sept 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
John Aldrich Converse --
Gary Goldsmith MD Mount Auburn Hospital --
Pamela MacKenzie JD Goulston & Storrs --
Karen Maloney Community Volunteer --
Heidi-Rachel Webb Ed.M, JD Consilium Divorce Consultants --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 93%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 60%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2016 to Sept 30, 2017
Projected Income $495,000.00
Projected Expense $492,163.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $499,000 $401,000 $406,262
Total Expenses $426,094 $430,029 $374,194

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $466,000 $355,000 $178,000
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $33,000 $10,000 --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $36,000 $227,000

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $292,400 $266,000 $221,690
Administration Expense $71,814 $75,349 $83,504
Fundraising Expense $61,880 $88,680 $69,000
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.