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Baraka Community Wellness

 130 Warren Street
 Roxbury , MA 02119
[P] (617) 514-0633 x 6
[F] (617) 514-0633
barakawellness.org
[email protected]
Raheem Baraka
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INCORPORATED: 2013
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 46-2584139

LAST UPDATED: 11/27/2017
Organization DBA FoodCares
Healthy Moms Healthy Kids
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Baraka Community Wellness's Mission is to provide wellness solutions for at-risk individuals and communities that engage, educate, and empower to close the gap of health disparities and reduce healthcare costs.

Mission Statement

Baraka Community Wellness's Mission is to provide wellness solutions for at-risk individuals and communities that engage, educate, and empower to close the gap of health disparities and reduce healthcare costs.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $193,366.00
Projected Expense $184,020.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • FoodCares
  • Healthy Moms Healthy Kids

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Baraka Community Wellness's Mission is to provide wellness solutions for at-risk individuals and communities that engage, educate, and empower to close the gap of health disparities and reduce healthcare costs.

Background Statement

Baraka Community Wellness (BCW), a Boston based 501(c)(3) organization that began programming in July 2015, designs and manages comprehensive, integrated wellness solutions for healthcare agencies, nonprofit organizations, municipalities, and the community. BCW implements wellness solutions that deliver measurable results with lasting positive health outcomes that reduce risk, enhance health, increase productivity and reduce healthcare costs. BCW's integrated program model Healthy Families Healthy Communities (HFHC) addresses the root cause of key social determinants of health, namely: lifestyle and behaviors, food access and nutrition education; The core programs within the HFHC model are Healthy Moms Healthy Kids, FoodCaresBOSTON, W.e.FIT and Community Cooking Academy which are informed by evidence gleaned from the experiences of low-income families and individuals who live in low income neighborhoods, many in subsidized public housing. BCW's comprehensive suite of programs offers fitness and nutrition education, health coaching and advocacy, and social supports such as enhanced food access for those identifying as being food insecure. HFHC authentically addresses the needs of at-risk population, the needs of the community at-large and the healthcare system's economic burdens by providing an evidenced-based program focusing on health and chronic disease prevention. Importantly, HFHC provides the tools in the community and on the ground with limited barriers of engagement that improve health, give equitable access to high quality services with efficacy and within culturally appropriate environments.
 
BCW bridges the gap of traditional healthcare and community intervention programs by collaborating with hospitals, nonprofit organizations, and key stakeholders with a specific interest and mission to improve health outcomes of at-risk populations. Through this approach of building community connection and resilience, we are creating an integrated system of wellness promotion and disease prevention for the most vulnerable populations of Boston that is evidenced-based, evidence-informed and founded upon practical solutions that are low cost, culturally competent, effective and sustainable.

Impact Statement

Baraka Community Wellness has created impact by;

1) Provided wellness programming to 505 direct participants with households totaling 2423 family members including 845 children.

2) Distributed 180,770lbs of free fresh healthy food to those experiencing food insecurity and throughout the Healthy Families Healthy Communities program Framework.

3) Reduced or controlled hypertension of participants measured within Healthy Families Healthy Communities by 40%

4) Reduced obesity and overweight physiological positions of participants measured by 60%

5) Opened a prominent storefront within the Boston Public Market as an aggregator of urban and locally grown produce to support their businesses and simultaneously scale our FoodCares program to meet the need of food insecurity challenges within Boston’s vulnerable populations.

Baraka Community Wellness’s Goals for 2018 are to;

1) Establish a Teaching Kitchen and Market within New Academy Estates, a low income housing development within Roxbury MA, to provide programming and support around food access, nutrition education and health coaching for the residents of this development.

2) Scale our FoodCares Program to meeting the challenges of food insecurity within Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan from 440 to 660 direct participants.

3) Establish a new headquarters inclusive of a teaching kitchen and 3 season fitness area in partnership with Urban Farming Institute at Fowler Clark Epstein Farm in Mattapan MA to provide increased engagement and participation within our Healthy Moms Health Kids and Community Cooking Academy programs.

4) Begin direct insurance reimbursement of Medical Nutrition Therapy services provided though our Healthy Families Healthy Communities framework in partnership with Partners Healthcare.

5) Increase support and aggregation of urban farmers within Boston through our FoodCares Market within the Boston Public Market to continue to scale our FoodCares program and the economic vitality of urban farms within Boston and Eastern Massachusetts.



Needs Statement

Baraka Community Wellness (BCW) is looking to scale to adequately address the disproportionate poor health outcomes of the communities that are served, create greater impact and optimum operational efficiencies. Specifically BCW requires:

1) Financial resources to staff accordingly with professionally trained, qualified, and passionate talent to ensure the efficacy of program delivery.

2) Financial resources to support the transition into stable revenue streams that will allow for BCW to becoming financially sustainable with minimal need of significant philanthropic support by 2021

3) Technical support and assistance to help identify key future stakeholders and improved coordination to creating more effective collective impact.

4) Technical support and assistance with mechanisms for outcome evaluation to deliver upon the mission with empirical impact for health outcomes as well as social improvements within the populations served.

5) Deeper integration within overall healthcare systems within Boston and affiliate hospitals and community Health Centers to increase efficacy and coordination of care, both clinical and holistic, for the populations served


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
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Organization Categories

  1. Health Care - Public Health
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

FoodCares

FoodCares addresses the issues around poor dietary habits, food insecurity and lack of access to fresh healthy food within lower income communities mainly within public and subsidized housing. FoodCares' methodology is to provide access to high quality fresh food while delivering nutrition education around proper food choices and to focus on the root causes that have created this social problem. Additionally, the program is a gateway to the suite of programs offered by BCW which provides an integrated model to address the compounding effect of specific social determinants that greatly impact this population. Since the initial launch of the program within the public housing development of Boston Housing Authority’s Mildred Hailey Apartments in Jamaica Plain, MA and Mass Housing’s Academy Homes in Roxbury, MA, the program has expanded to four additional program sites; Boston Housing Authority South Street Development, Curtis Hall Community Center, Epiphany School and New Academy Estates.

Budget  $137,000.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Hunger Action
Population Served Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 

FoodCares which began in the summer of 2016 with an initial cohort of 100 participants has scaled to providing food access and nutrition education to 440 direct participants and has distributed 180,770 pounds of fresh health food. Specific successes achieved through the program are related to food knowledge, improved purchasing behaviors for healthier options and specifically a reduction of food insecurity rates 80% of the current participants enrolled.

Program Long-Term Success 

Long term success will be measured by the significant reduction of overall food insecurity rates within the communities and populations served. Specifically by 2021 we look to achieve a community-wide reduction of individuals identifying as being food insecure by 20% within the neighborhoods of Mattapan, Roxbury, Jamaica Plain and Dorchester though the replication of FoodCares program sites strategically aligned with public and subsidized housing developments. 

An important catalysts to the future success of the FoodCares program is a partnership with MassHousing / New Academy Estates, where Baraka Community Wellness will begin a pilot Teaching Kitchen and Market to address food access, food insecurity and nutrition education for the residents of this development. The market will 1) Provide nutritious, sustainably produced, and local urban foods with a focus on items appropriate for individuals with preventable chronic diseases specifically those that are directly related to dietary related illness. 2) Connect patrons of the market with robust programming of BCW that gives access to high quality wellness opportunities and enhances clinical connections and outcomes. 3) Be designed around a traditional grocery store, or “Bodega” environment, allowing residents to shop as one might ordinarily do enhanced with technology for “Just In Time” purchasing that is built around a central teaching kitchen providing core nutrition education and health advocacy programing through dietitians and health coaches. 4) Be an extension of distribution for the product attained through the distribution aggregation model of the Boston Public Market retail establishment. 5) Provide hospitals a referral point for medically tailored meals and nutrition prescriptions. 6) Be a hub for enhanced food access and provide the sale of items on a sliding scale and work with the Department of Transitional Assistance and Department of Public Health to enable acceptance of SNAP and WIC benefits.


Program Success Monitored By 

Participants of FoodCares are monitored via a membership database that tracks frequency of utilization and the types of food (both grocery and produce) that are received. Addtionally, FoodCares has been recognized as a valuable resource for Brigham and Woman's Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center for it's patient population that is identifying as being food insecure. Though this partnership we look to gather additional biometric and lab data in regards to malnutrition that effect overall health status and educational deficits created by malnutrition and imbalanced diets and the impact of this intervention for nearly 1200 patients. 

Examples of Program Success 

FoodCares has been successfully operating within the communities of Jamaica Plain, Roxbury and Dorchester to support the challenges of food insecurity for those living at or below the Federal Poverty Line and in low income housing developments. Overall the program has engaged 440 participants that initially identified as being food insecure and we have reduced this rate by 80%.


Healthy Moms Healthy Kids

Healthy Moms Healthy Kids is a comprehensive wellness intervention program within Baraka Community Wellness's Healthy Families Healthy Communities framework specifically for at-risk mothers and children that engages participants through an evidence based methodology by delivering elements of fitness, health coaching, nutrition and social support mechanisms that lead to learning life skills, self-efficacy and improved health outcomes. At the core of the program delivery, social determinants of health are addressed, specifically lifestyle & behavior, food access and insecurities, and safe healthy environments.

Healthy Moms Healthy Kids addresses the needs of vulnerable populations of mothers caregivers and children, the needs of the community at-large and the healthcare system's economic burdens by providing an evidenced-based program focusing on health and chronic disease prevention. The program focuses on health issues though a comprehensive engagement of fitness, nutrition education, health coaching and social support mechanisms to foster and increase motivation, behavioral change, knowledge, self-efficacy and sustainable improvements in health. Through authentic engagement the program provides the tools for improvements in health, equitable access to high quality support services with efficacy and a culturally appropriate environment. Our goal is to address the needs of mothers and children at-risk and assist them on the path to optimum health while providing the building blocks for a total culture of health.

Healthy Moms Healthy Kids is a free program to all participants, with the core elements consisting of 1) Certified personal trainers and group instructors skilled in developing physical activity regimens and behavioral modification techniques lead through group exercises classes. The trainers utilize a methodology of progressive fitness training devised through the American College of Sports Medicine as well as culturally competent modalities such as Zumba. 2) Registered Dietitians provide nutritional services including weekly workshops, cooking demonstrations and one-on-one individualized health coaching. 3) Healthy food subsidies addressing issues of healthy food access by providing each participant with 10lbs+ of fresh produce each week. 4) Free childcare, to further reduce the barrier of engagement, for children younger than 7 years of age while those children older than 7 years of age participate with their mothers.

 
Budget  $178,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Preventive Health
Population Served Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Families
Program Short-Term Success 
Specific short-term success of the program since its inception;
  1. Diverted 11 participants from the immediate need for medications due to preventable chronic diseases with an example of cost savings for one participant totaling $63,765.00.
  2. Provided a cumulative 1345 hours of bilingual nutrition lessons, cooking workshops, health coaching sessions and fitness instruction since launching in July 2015 with sustainable changes in behavior and physiological position of 70% of participants.
  3. Has supported the social needs of two Partners Healthcare health centers; Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center and Brookside Health Center
  4. Is recognized as a key engagement point by Boston Center for Youth and Families Curtis Hall Community Center for at-risk mothers and caregivers within Jamaica Plain.
Program Long-Term Success 
Long Term Success will be measured by;
 
1) Reduction in overall acute healthcare costs, specifically healthcare expenditures for participants served equal to 10X the operating budget of BCW by 2020.
2)Continual increased participation of members within the Healthy Moms Healthy Kids program from multiple Boston neighborhoods.
3) Replicate program in multiple sites within Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan and the ability to scale and replicate the model into other at-risk communities
4) Deeper integration within the overall Healthcare system
Program Success Monitored By  Evaluation and monitoring is at the core of the program to guide effectiveness of program delivery. Baseline data is gathered from program participants before enrollment. Examples of data collected include: weight, Body Mass Index (BMI), resting heart rate, blood pressure, as well as nutrition literacy and metrics of mental and emotional health. These data are gathered weekly from participants while they are actively engaged in the program, and via post-program assessments at 3, 6, 12 and 24-months to ascertain both the immediate and the long-term impacts of the program. Our belief is that regular monitoring of individual and family progress helps to sustain motivation and prevents relapse into unhealthy behaviors. To assist our evaluation process, we are establishing a clinic feedback mechanism with Brigham and Women's Hospital Southern Jamaica Plain and Brookside Health Centers to provide support for monitoring ongoing clinical changes and verify our collected data and look to expand this relationship to reach the entire Boston medical community.
Examples of Program Success 

Specific Achievements of the program since its inception;

  1. Diverted 11 participants from the immediate need for medications due to preventable chronic diseases with an example of cost savings for one participant totaling $63,765.00.
  2. Provided a cumulative 1345 hours of bilingual nutrition lessons, cooking workshops, health coaching sessions and fitness instruction since launching in July 2015 with sustainable changes in behavior and physiological position of 70% of participants.
  3. Has supported the social needs of two Partners Healthcare health centers; Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center and Brookside Health Center
  4. Is recognized as a key engagement point by Boston Center for Youth and Families Curtis Hall Community Center for at-risk mothers and caregivers within Jamaica Plain.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Raheem Baraka
CEO Term Start Feb 2013
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 7
Number of Volunteers 15
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 7
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly

Governance


Board Chair Mr. David Trietsch
Board Chair Company Affiliation Combined Jewish Philanthropies
Board Chair Term Mar 2016 - Dec 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Raheem Baraka Baraka Community Wellness Voting
Ruth Hennig The John Merck Fund Voting
Eileen Manning Retired Voting
Florence Slepian Retired Voting
David Trietsch Combined Jewish Philanthropies Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $193,366.00
Projected Expense $184,020.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Total Revenue $55,066 -- --
Total Expenses $48,087 -- --

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 -- --
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $55,066 -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Program Expense $27,845 -- --
Administration Expense $20,242 -- --
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.15 -- --
Program Expense/Total Expenses 58% -- --
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% -- --

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Total Assets $6,979 -- --
Current Assets $6,979 -- --
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- --
Current Liabilities $0 -- --
Total Net Assets $6,979 -- --

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% -- --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

This nonprofit is newer, as such one full year of financial summary data is posted above in the charts and graphs per the organization's IRS Form 990-EZ. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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