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Power of Flowers Project

 365 East Street, PO Box 294
 Tewksbury, MA 01876
[P] (978) 2268545
[F] --
www.powerofflowersproject.org
[email protected]
Leslie Kirle
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 2013
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 46-1082544

LAST UPDATED: 01/30/2018
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

The Power of Flowers Project rescues flowers, repurposes them into beautiful bouquets and delivers them to seniors and others in need in our community to bring moments of joy and to build caring, compassionate relationships, with the help of dedicated volunteers.

Mission Statement

The Power of Flowers Project rescues flowers, repurposes them into beautiful bouquets and delivers them to seniors and others in need in our community to bring moments of joy and to build caring, compassionate relationships, with the help of dedicated volunteers.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $106,757.00
Projected Expense $92,253.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Flower Therapy Workshops
  • Individual Bouquet Delivery
  • Kindness Connections

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Power of Flowers Project rescues flowers, repurposes them into beautiful bouquets and delivers them to seniors and others in need in our community to bring moments of joy and to build caring, compassionate relationships, with the help of dedicated volunteers.

Background Statement

The founder, Joyce Bellefeuille, a former floral designer had a vision to repurpose gently used flowers to enrich the lives of people who are lonely, isolated or ill.  She began the project in her basement with a friend, and a flower donor.  Due to her single-focused dedication to the mission of bringing joy to the elderly and underserved, the organization has grown in 8 years to bring joy to thousands of elderly in 121 care communities in 31 cities and towns. Donated flowers, that would otherwise be thrown into dumpsters or landfills, come from weddings, corporate events, memorial services and overstocks from retailers and wholesalers. Not only do dedicated volunteers process the flowers saving about 70% of them, they also make and deliver the bouquets, they help with the business side, the fundraising, and the upkeep of the workshop.  The operation has delivered more than 70,000 joyous occasions to seniors northwest of Boston.  In addition to regular bouquet production in the workshop, Flower Therapy Workshops are held on-site in care communities with volunteers bringing flowers and all the necessary supplies to the site and then engaging residents in the joy of making their own bouquets.  Another program, Kindness Connections, is an effort to create corporate community service with employees making bouquets at their place of work; the bouquets are delivered to care communities chosen by the corporation and they share credit for the gift of kindness.
 
The Power of Flowers Project is also environmentally friendly.  In addition to saving 70% of donated flowers from the waste stream and giving them new life, the bouquets are made in biodegradable cups, plant material is composted, cardboard is recycled and all the floral materials and containers that can be salvaged are sold back to the floral industry for re-use.  
          

Impact Statement

Accomplishments of which we are most proud:

1.  Bouquets Delivered: 54,496 by year-end 2016; we are on track to total 75,000 by year end 2017 (65,769 as of 6/30/17).
 
2.  Volunteers: From 60 in 2016 to 140 by mid-year 2017.
 
3.  Flower Donors: From 31 in 2016 to 63 regular donors in 2017

4.  Flower Therapy Workshops: From 52 in 2016 to 66 in 2017

5.  Hired our first part time Executive Director  
 
Most Important Goals for this year:
 
1.  Develop a new program, Kindness Connections, to encourage corporate community service with employees creating bouquets for care communities; 2 pilot programs successfully completed in 2017.

2.  Enlarge our Board of Directors with dedicated members with a specific goal of adding corporate and business community directors.

3. To identify revenue sources to create a reliable revenue stream to support and sustain our programs and support our mission.  
 
4. To hire a marketing professional.
 
 

Needs Statement

1. To identify revenue sources that will increase future sustainability and stability.  Increase repeat revenue streams by 20%.

2.  To continue, strengthen and increase programs to provide joy and hope to underserved, disabled, and often lonely older adults, particularly those in care communities.  To earn corporate support from 5 corporations or businesses; to find sponsors for 5 care communities that cannot afford flower therapy workshops.  

3.  To increase the delivery of bouquets and hope through partnering with services like Meals on Wheels and adult day services to reach seniors and others in need who continue to live in their homes. Add 5 such partners to reach seniors in their homes.

4. To initiate and create a long range planning strategy that will serve to guide the program and sustain the organization. Hold a formal retreat dedicated to identifying strategies.

5. To hire personnel in areas of marketing, advancement, and volunteer coordination.

CEO Statement

I joined the Power of Flowers Project because of its simple yet compelling mission – we rescue flowers, repurpose them into beautiful bouquets and deliver them to seniors and others in need to bring moments of joy and build caring, compassionate connections. We have been doing this since 2009 with the help of a growing group of dedicated volunteers. With over 25 years of experience in the health care field, I’ve seen how small acts of kindness and the importance of human connection can help to prevent loneliness and despair and improve the emotional well-being and overall quality of life of those less fortunate.

The majority of the people being served by our project are over the age of 65. Many are in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, veterans homes, shelters or they are home bound because of illness or disability. These people are often isolated, depressed, lonely and many times forgotten by family and friends. Over the past eight years we have recycled thousands of flowers and delivered nearly 70,000 bouquets – a remarkable achievement and testament to the work that our dedicated volunteers do every day to make a difference. These bouquets have been delivered for free to nursing homes, assisted and independent living facilities, senior centers, Meals on Wheels clients, shelters, veterans events and housing, elderly housing and others.

In addition to the delivery of bouquets, we provide Flower Therapy Workshops to seniors where they live or spend their days and we have begun a new program called Kindness Connections where we collaborate with local businesses to provide volunteer opportunities for their employees.

In my role as the first paid part-time Executive Director, I hope to utilize my skills and experience in ways that will help grow and sustain the organization so that we can have greater impact in the cities and towns in our service area. In the next two to three years, we would like to expand our presence in the 15-mile radius of our workshop in Tewksbury. We intend to do this by increasing our donated flower supply, growing our volunteer base especially in underserved towns, increasing the frequency of flower bouquet deliveries with a goal of reaching 100,000 flower recipients, increasing the number of elder care facilities we deliver to in areas we serve, and expanding our Flower Therapy and Kindness Connections Programs.

To do this, we need financial support. We appreciate the opportunity to be part of the Giving Common and to tell our story and be connected with the broader community of potential donors, institutional funders, and other stakeholders interested in our mission.


Board Chair Statement

There is no down-side to the Power of Flowers Project. We take a commodity—barely used fresh flowers from one-time events—and give them a second life to bring joy to often overlooked, underserved seniors and others in need in our communities. Moreover, we take our commitment to the environment seriously, saving about 70% of the flowers donated, making the bouquets in biodegradable cups, recycling cardboard, and selling floral containers and supplies back to the floral industry to help our bottom line.

We are at the threshold of sustainability and my goal has been to push the organization into stability with a reliable revenue stream, a larger, stronger board of directors, ramped up fundraising events, increased focus on marketing and image-building, and documentation of policies and procedures as we have grown from a one-woman show to an organization with 150 volunteers serving 121 care communities in 31 cities and towns.

We are well on our way to achieving these goals with a budget and revenue that has more than doubled in 2 years, a new Executive Director, three significant fund-raisers and several small efforts, and a board that has doubled as well. We still need personnel to help us achieve our long term planning goals, specifically a marketing professional, a volunteer coordinator, and an advancement officer. In addition, we need to change our image from “sweet retired flowers ladies” into the dynamic, diverse, and powerful group we are.

It is a very exciting time in the growth of the Power of Flowers Project and we look forward to expanding our mission and making the lives of our growing population of seniors and other underserved older adults brighter, better, happier. Rutgers research (human-nature.com/ep—2005. 3:104-132) shows flowers can do this….and we can do the flowers.

I am a retired attorney and I can think of nothing more valuable for me to do at this time in my life than devote time to this worthy mission which has no down-side. No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted--Aesop. 

Geographic Area Served

NORTHEAST REGION, MA
We serve 31 towns and cities in the greater Merrimack Valley which are within 20 miles of our workshop on the Tewksbury Hospital campus in Tewksbury, MA. We serve as far north at Nashua, NH and as far south as Burlington, MA.  We also include Lexington and Concord which are in the MetroWest area.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Senior Centers/Services
  2. Environment - Recycling
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Alliances & Advocacy

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Flower Therapy Workshops

This program provides the ‘hands-on’ experience of making a fresh flower bouquet which the participant may keep. All materials, supplies and donated flowers are provided for participants. Instruction, guidance and encouragement is provided by volunteers to participants where they live or attend program. This program offers participants an opportunity to socialize and interact with others; it improves memory, cognitive ability and eye-hand coordination; it promotes problem solving and a feeling of accomplishment; it stimulates the senses of smell, sight, and touch; and it decreases depression and loneliness.
 
We charge $150 for 20 participants. The initial cost of setting up supplies and materials, not including volunteer labor and donated flowers is $257.54; cost of disposable for repeat workshops is $43.89.
Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other Senior Services
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens At-Risk Populations Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success  A significant factor is monitoring the number of repeat workshops requested by facilities. By mid-2017, we are doing monthly workshops at 6 locations and bi-monthly or regularly scheduled workshops in several facilities as they have program resources to do so.
Program Long-Term Success  Program is just 2 years old but we have grown from a pilot program in 2015 to 84 programs in 2016, al serving older adults, often underserved.
Program Success Monitored By 

Our software system captures the number our workshops and the number of participants and volunteers engaged in each workshop. The budget revenue stream reflects the income.

Examples of Program Success 

The growing number of requests to schedule workshops is an indicator as is the fact that sponsors of our annual fundraiser can opt to sponsor workshops and this has become an important marketing factor. This also allows us to introduce the program to a facility previously unaware of it.


Individual Bouquet Delivery

Donated flowers are rescued and repurposed into individual bouquets by volunteers and delivered to seniors and others in need in care communities, hospice, and other sites to lift their spirits, brighten their lives, lets them know they are valued.
 
In 2016, excluding volunteer labor and donated flower costs, a bouquet cost $3.93. Volunteers use their own vehicles to deliver the bouquets.
 
Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other Senior Services
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens At-Risk Populations Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success  In the short term, we document and monitor the increase in number of floral donors and volunteers both of which are key to the success of the program. Floral donors increased from 31 in 2015 to 63 in 2016; volunteers increased from 60 active volunteers in 2015 to 84 in 2016.
Program Long-Term Success  In 8 years, we have made and delivered over 70,000 bouquets at no charge in this area, each year getting more donated flowers, more volunteers and servicing a larger number of ill, lonely and underserved older adults.
Program Success Monitored By  Our software system captures the number of floral donors and the` number of pieces each donates each time, the number of volunteers, the hours worked by volunteers, the number of bouquets delivered on a daily basis.
Examples of Program Success  Notes of gratitude come from recipients and from staff at various sites remarking on the joy, happiness and importance of this small gift. Here are a few examples. “The flowers brighten every day for us,” signed by 28 residents of Benchmark at Robbins Brook. “My Mother attends program in Burlington and she loves flowers. She has come home with a few of your bouquets. They are always fresh and last several days.” Cooperative Elder Services, Inc. “This week you brought flowers to me. They are beautiful and give me much joy.” Resident at Methuen Village. “We just want to thank you for always brightening up our days with beautiful flowers. You may not realize it but all your hard work really means so much to all of us at Sunny Acres.” And, there are hundreds more!

Kindness Connections

This is our newest program wherein we partner with businesses and corporations to create a team-building, community service effort for employees. Modeled on the Flower Therapy Workshops, volunteers bring flowers and materials to the corporate site and engage in making bouquets with employees. In the alternative, the company can bring its employees to our Tewksbury Workshop where they can create the bouquets. The cups in which the bouquets are made carry the name of the company. The company/employees can select the care community to which the bouquets will be delivered and even deliver them if they wish. Typically, employees can crate several bouquets at each session to bring joy to others; they do not keep them for themselves. To date, we have only conducted two pilot programs.
 
The charge is $500 for 20 participants. The initial cost of setting up supplies and materials, not including volunteer labor and donated flowers, is $257.54; cost per bouquet (cup, label, floral foam, finishing spray), not including donated flowers and volunteer labor is $4.89, assuming each participant makes 3 bouquets. We have not charged a fee for conducting the pilot programs.
Budget  --
Category  Philanthropy, Voluntarism & Grantmaking, General/Other Community Service
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

In the short term, the pilot program received an enthusiastic response from employees and the company asked us to do a second pilot there which we did. The marketing challenge is to move from this one company to others in the Route 3 corridor and to encourage companies to pay for this service. We need to overcome the idea that this service should be offered at no charge to companies because it is “community service”.

Program Long-Term Success 

Two pilot programs in 2017; no long term information to report.

Program Success Monitored By 

Our software system captures the number our workshops and the number of participants and volunteers engaged in each workshop. The budget revenue stream reflects the income.

Examples of Program Success 

The pilot program at Black Duck Software was met with enthusiasm and many of those attending the first session returned for a second one. Repetition of the program and testimonials will be Indicators of success.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Our challenge and our opportunity is to achieve sustainability, that is to sustain ourselves over the long term, perpetuating our ability to fulfill our mission.  In order to do this, we need to accomplish three goals:  Effective programs; Reliable and diversified revenue stream; and Strong leadership.  We are poised on the brink of all three of these goals and are working hard to put in place the prerequisites for attaining them.  We are working to deepen, strengthen and enhance the three excellent programs we have and not to add more at this time; we have quadrupled revenue in the last three years and kept expenses in check; and we have tripled the size of the board and improved the quality of the board in the same time frame.  We are small but determined and we are focused.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Leslie Kirle
CEO Term Start June 2017
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Leslie Kirle holds a Masters in Public Health and has over 25 years of collaborative experience in developing and managing innovative health care quality, consumer engagement, and public health initiatives.  She was the Senior Director of Clinical Policy and Patient Advocacy for the Massachusetts Hospital Association for many years and, more recently, provided leadership to a local community, one of sixteen funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in the United States, to improve the quality of health care.   She is listed as an author on more than a dozen professional articles and served as an Assistant Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine as well as being Project Director for the Institute for Clinical Research & Health Policy Studies at that university's Medical Center.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 150
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 1
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Linda W. Conrad J.D.
Board Chair Company Affiliation The Power of Flowers Project
Board Chair Term Jan 2015 - Dec 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Lois Alves Ph.D. Retired Voting
Joyce Bellefeuille Retired Voting
Judy Burke Dean MCC, Corporate & Community Education and Training Voting
Gayle Casper Assistant Vice President Enterprise Bank Voting
Patrice Dolan Dolan Funeral Home Voting
Janet Dubner Retired Voting
Patrice Ficociello Ph.D. Retired Voting
Andrea Jackson Team Walk Director Lowell General Hospital Voting
Maria Martin Executive Director BrightView at Concord River Assisted Living Voting
Anne Marie Messier Owner Straightline Management Solutions Voting
James O'Donnell President and Owner O'Donnell Funeral Homes Voting
Andrew Olden CPA Andrew Olden, LLC Voting
Michelle Silveira Senior Vice President Jeanne D'Arc Credit Union --
Grace Tilton Ph.D. Families in Transition Consulting Services Voting
Richard L. Williams Executive Director Blaire House Assisted Living Voting
Kali Woodbridge Retired Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 16
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 14
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 60%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We are at the threshold of sustainability and my goal has been to push the organization into stability with a reliable revenue stream, a larger, stronger board of directors, ramped up fundraising events, increased focus on marketing and image-building, and documentation of policies and procedures as we have grown from a one-woman show to an organization with 150 volunteers serving 121 care communities in 31 cities and towns.

We are well on our way to achieving these goals with a budget and revenue that has more than doubled in 2 years, a new Executive Director, three significant fund-raisers and several small efforts, and a board that has doubled as well. We still need personnel to help us achieve our long term planning goals, specifically a marketing professional, a volunteer coordinator, and an advancement officer. In addition, we need to change our image from “sweet retired flowers ladies” into the dynamic, diverse, and powerful group we are.

It is a very exciting time in the growth of the Power of Flowers Project and we look forward to expanding our mission and making the lives of our growing population of seniors and other underserved older adults brighter, better, happier. Rutgers research (human-nature.com/ep—2005. 3:104-132) shows flowers can do this….and we can do the flowers.  We have increased our volunteers, our floral donors, our monetary donors, our physical workshop space, and our revenue stream in the past two years.  The goal is to continue this growth achieving a sustainable organization serving the elderly, ill and isolated. 

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $106,757.00
Projected Expense $92,253.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $82,008 $92,359 $23,950
Total Expenses $59,268 $36,946 $13,943

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $82,008 $92,359 $23,950
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $34,786 $26,870 $2,799
Administration Expense $24,482 $10,076 $11,144
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.38 2.50 1.72
Program Expense/Total Expenses 59% 73% 20%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $98,393 $75,653 $20,241
Current Assets $80,768 $56,338 $20,241
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $98,393 $75,653 $20,241

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990-EZ's. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

The ultimate goal for the Power of Flowers Project is to sustainability over the long term in order to perpetuate our ability to fulfill our mission. To achieve this goal would mean that every older adult in our region, in care communities or home-bound, would receive flowers on a regular basis to improve their quality of life, to reduce loneliness and depression, and to let them know they are valued. To accomplish this, we need 1) effective programs and services, 2) a reliable and diversified revenue stream, and 3) strong leadership. 

  1. We now reach 120 care communities in 31 towns and cities but we do not reach every older adult in our area who needs a lift; reaching every care community with flowers delivered on a regular revolving delivery basis and supporting Meals on Wheels deliveries with flowers in every community in our area will translate into success.
  2. We have diversified our revenue stream, adding an annual signature fundraising event, Flower Therapy Workshops in care communities and paid for by those community and Kindness Connection Workshops in corporate settings to encourage corporate community service the results of which (bouquets) are delivered to care communities, an annual Victorian Tea and an annual Plant Sale, re-selling floral containers and materials back to the industry, and holding several hands-on seasonal workshops for volunteers and other supporters. Revenue in 2013 was $12,600; revenue in 2016 was $83,900; we expect revenue in 2017 to be around $105,000. Success in the area will be measured by having 3 years of operating expenses in a segregated account. Operating expenses currently are $52,600.
  3. Strong leadership is evolving. The membership on the Board of Directors has risen from 6 in 2013 to 18 currently. The members represent care communities, community partners, volunteers, floral donors, and older adults. The board needs additional corporate and business partners. The first Executive Director was hired part time in June 2017, with a strong background in nonprofits; the plan is that she will become full-time as a revenue can provide support. Success will be measured by hiring, as revenue allows, a part time Marketing/Events Director and a Volunteer Coordinator.



2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

  1. We have identified all care communities within 20 miles of our Tewksbury Workshop and we are working with Merrimack Valley Senior Services and Minuteman Senior Services to reach homebound older adults. We have software that allows us to track deliveries; a schedule of penetration and rotation needs to be implemented to achieve coverage in our areas. In 2013, we delivered 3,700 bouquets; in 2016, we delivered 18,037; and we will exceed that in 2017 in an effort to reach this long underserved population on a regular basis with a bit of joy and brightness – research supports this effect. Additionally, we need to recruit/retain volunteers in these communities to support these programs since it is volunteers that pick up the donate flowers, make the bouquets and deliver the bouquets. Active volunteers’ numbers have risen from 10 in 2013 to 113 in 2016 and they continue to rise. Floral donors supply the product and donors have doubled from 31 in 2015 to 63 in 2016. Concerted efforts are aimed at reaching newer sources for floral donations including event managers, brides, corporations, and educational facilities to obtain flowers from their events.
  2. With the introduction of the annual fundraiser luncheon in the fall of 2015, we began our push to diversify and increase revenue. The first luncheon netted $15,525; the second netted $30,562; and we expect the October, 2017 event to net $45,000. Care Communities pay $150 for Flower Therapy workshops during which residents make their own bouquets with flowers and materials we supply – along with volunteers to assist and engage the participants. These workshops have grown in popularity from 47 in 2015 to 52 in 2016 and we expect a big jump in numbers by 2017 year-end. This workshop program is being replicated in corporate settings, now in pilot program phase, to encourage team building and corporate community service. Success for this program will mean that we have 5 paid corporate Kindness Connection Workshops in 2017 and 2 new board members from that venue. Our first Annual Plant Sale netted $3,274, the second in 2017 netted $4,100. Our first Annual Victorian Tea this year with 75 people netted $1,237; with 125 people, 2018 is projected to double that net. Additionally, we instituted hands-on workshops for volunteers and community friends making wreaths, boxwood trees, etc., as money-makers and each nets about a thousand dollars. A consistent revenue source is the re-sale of floral containers and materials, in which we receive donated flowers, back to the floral industry. We re-use, recycle, re-purpose and resell all that we can. These activities expose our work to the families, friends, and community at large which generates more floral donors, more volunteers, and more revenue … most important, it exposes the needs for reaching our older adults, those who took care of us and who now need taking care of!
  3. Strong leadership begins with the board. Board members have identified areas (IT, legal, marketing, management) in which we’d like board expertise and members have been asked to bring in one new board member each year. As board members’ terms expire, we are forming a Board Emeritus to seek continuing support from these valuable members. Our corporate community service serves to support our board need for members from that area.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

  1. No one else in our area does what we do. Only the Power of Flowers Project delivers flowers free of charts to the ill, isolated, and underserved populations in the Route 3 corridor north of Boston. The Power of Flowers is capable of reaching goals with a strong volunteer force, a cohesive data management program, and an executive director who share the goal of reaching all those older adults in need of a lift in our area on a regular basis. Budget supports the software and we now have the expertise. We need to build more community partnerships with other nonprofit agencies to cooperate in mutual efforts to increase our regularity and penetration in our area.
  2. We have in place a variety of revenue-producing program/events to provide a threshold for operations and each of these has been met with enthusiasm and with incremental income generation. We need to continue to build these annual/regular events, improving the product and the income. In addition, we need to identify more corporate/business/community supporters who believe in our mission and will support sustainability. Our corporate community service program is an attempt to do this as is our continuing outreach for board members and other business leaders. We anticipate improving our social media presence, updating our website, and creating more avenues of donations, memorial gifts, legacy gifts, etc.
  3. We now have the skeleton staff with which to accomplish our goals but we need additional staff to create success. We have set aside budget for additional personnel time to lead us and for marketing purposes to increase influence in the communities we serve, both among our constituents and the community members at large. We have an enthusiastic volunteer base that generates kindness, cooperation and leadership but we need to identify professional skills among our volunteers and utilize them to the fullest. To this end we are upgrading our Volunteer Sign-Up on our website. We know there is a ton of expertise and talent from which we can benefit.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Numbers signal progress and success. Growth numbers have been provided throughout this commentary.

1) Increasing the number of bouquets delivered annually by 15% is a goal for regular delivery. Delivering to every site at least 4 times a year by the end of 2018. Reaching every care community in our basin by the end of 2019. Increasing the number of Flower Therapy Workshops by 15% annually and adding 5 new sites for workshops is the goal. Successfully holding 5 paid corporate community service workshops in 2018, 10 in 2019 and 24 in 2020 is the goal. Revising our Evaluation Forms for these programs and developing a method to chart the success of the program with the participants as well as with the Activity Director of the care communities. Establish a research program, either with numerous PhD volunteers we have heading it or cooperating with some local university, to build on the research showing the positive impact of flowers on the elderly, not unlike that work done by Jeannette Haviland-Jones, Ph.D., at Rutgers. This would validate our services, so often in competition with food, shelter and housing dollars, and give The Power of Flowers Project a national profile.

2) Making budget this year and setting aside one year’s expense in a reserve account. Creating a solid budget for the coming year and continuing monthly and a more rigorous mid-year review of budget positions.

3) A CPA on our board gives tirelessly of his time and talent to shepherd our financial situation into a stable one. A number of volunteers who have heavy financial backgrounds regularly contribute expertise in terms of building budgets, reviewing budget, raising cautionary signals. Financial policies and procedures are being developed and documentation is underway to fortify this process. All policies and procedures are being documented for the organization; this process will be about half done by year-end 2017; this process is mandated by the Board and should be completed by the end of the first quarter of 2018.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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