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The Dignity Institute, Inc.

 73 Chelsea Street, Suite 308
 Charlestown, MA 02129
[P] (781) 8444916
[F] (339) 2049592
www.thedignityinstitute.org
[email protected]
Michele Simos
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INCORPORATED: 2014
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 46-4480924

LAST UPDATED: 11/27/2017
Organization DBA The Dignity Institute
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Dignity Institute empowers youth and families with life and leadership skills via the Urban Arts. Our main focus is our "Pathway to Profession" program,  which keeps youth in school and connects them to college and a career.

The Dignity Institute empowers underserved urban families to forge a pathway to a dignified life. We do this by creating a network of support, inspiring positive self-expression, and igniting the possibility within themselves through urban arts, mentoring and leadership skills.

Our core “Pathway to Profession” program helps youth avoid prison by helping them graduate from high school and connecting them to a career or college. By giving youth a creative voice and arming them with interpersonal skills and mentoring partners, they build their self-confidence, manage their behavior better and make better decisions.

Mission Statement

The Dignity Institute empowers youth and families with life and leadership skills via the Urban Arts. Our main focus is our "Pathway to Profession" program,  which keeps youth in school and connects them to college and a career.

The Dignity Institute empowers underserved urban families to forge a pathway to a dignified life. We do this by creating a network of support, inspiring positive self-expression, and igniting the possibility within themselves through urban arts, mentoring and leadership skills.

Our core “Pathway to Profession” program helps youth avoid prison by helping them graduate from high school and connecting them to a career or college. By giving youth a creative voice and arming them with interpersonal skills and mentoring partners, they build their self-confidence, manage their behavior better and make better decisions.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $15,000.00
Projected Expense $10,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Pathway to Profession
  • SMART Conversations for Families & Nonprofits
  • The 7th Element

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Dignity Institute empowers youth and families with life and leadership skills via the Urban Arts. Our main focus is our "Pathway to Profession" program,  which keeps youth in school and connects them to college and a career.

The Dignity Institute empowers underserved urban families to forge a pathway to a dignified life. We do this by creating a network of support, inspiring positive self-expression, and igniting the possibility within themselves through urban arts, mentoring and leadership skills.

Our core “Pathway to Profession” program helps youth avoid prison by helping them graduate from high school and connecting them to a career or college. By giving youth a creative voice and arming them with interpersonal skills and mentoring partners, they build their self-confidence, manage their behavior better and make better decisions.


Background Statement

The Dignity Institute was co-founded in January 2014 by two organizational development professionals/coaches in response to a need to help disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline. As experts in social-emotional skillbuilding, they wanted to bring their SMART Conversations®” work, which they had used within the corporate world to help underserved people succeed.

They have facilitated learning experiences with more than 7,000 people, from all backgrounds.

According to Michele, “we can all find a lot wrong with the world, and we wanted to build on something that is right with it. We are consistently in awe of the creativity, intelligence, resolve and resilience of the human spirit. And, we wanted to open the doors to that remarkable force within each of us. Through our work, we have seen people go from feeling helpless or less than to stepping into their power.”

They also provide their training to human services nonprofits, so they can become efficient and effective. Through a “Train-the-Trainer” program, they are able to teach the people they serve improve their lives.

At the same time, they envisioned The Dignity Institute, they were trying to find a way to expose teens to the concepts of SMART Conversations®. When they met a couple of rap artists and an urban dancer who shared their vision for giving underserved youth a positive path in life, they co-developed their children’s program, The 7th Element. This year, they will be launching their Pathway to Profession program for youth at-risk of dropping out of high school.

Together, with the support of community partners, foundations, individuals and companies, The Dignity Institute offers its programming at low- to no-cost. They deliver SMART Conversations® so that every human being has the opportunity to be treated with dignity and to reach their potential.


Impact Statement

2016-17 Accomplishments: Our young organization has provided life skills embedded in Urban Dance and Spoken Word for 125 children/teens. Sites have included Charlestown, Huntington Y, Boys and Girls Club/Chelsea and the Brookview House. We have also taught financial literacy at Zumix in East Boston. We have also created a curriculum for our Pathway to Profession program to help youth at-risk of dropping out of high school graduate and connect to a career or college. We are in the midst of a soft pilot in collaboration with the MGH Charlestown Coalition's "Turn It Around" program, which serves 40 youth, many of whom are failing high school.

Top Goals for 2017-2018: (1.) We plan to launch our Pathway to Profession program to help at-risk youth graduate; increase their employability through professional development and develop their personal leadership skills and social- emotional intelligence. This will run for the school year. (2.) Build our base of operating funds; (3) Design and offer our adult version to parents in under-resourced communities; (4.) Create additional partnerships to support our programming and to increase capacity.


Needs Statement

Five most pressing needs
1. Program funding. We need $100,000 to pilot and measure the success of a 6-month workforce development program
2. Hire a full-time program director. Salary in the $65-70,000 range
3. A part-time grant writer
4. Volunteers and a Volunteer Coordinator
5. Add'l. Board members
   

CEO Statement

The Dignity Institute empowers people to advocate for themselves, resolve conflict, collaborate and develop productive, meaningful relationships at home, at work and in their communities. We believe the conversations skills we teach through our SMART Conversations empowerment tool results in people living lives of dignity through self-respect. We look forward to launching our "Pathway to Profession" program, which focuses on improving the lives of youth at-risk of dropping out of high school by giving them SC via positive hip hop.  Our Artists/Youth Workers strive to build their confidence and help them discover their purpose and passion. The "team" concept creates a context for building character, cooperation and leadership skills. Our organization needs funding, volunteers and, eventually, a permanent space. We currently serve Greater Boston and would like to scale to New England.

Board Chair Statement

When you can impact a youth's view of themselves and the world, remarkable things can happen. We have seen children and teens transform from shy, angry or simply disengaged to outgoing, cheerful and motivated. To witness this type of change gives me hope, faith and a desire to do everything I can to make our mission and vision come to fruition. Let me share a story about Sienna.

“I want to be invisible.” These are the first words we ever heard spoken by 11 year-old Sienna* when we met her at our Spring collaboration with the Boys and Girls Club. Hidden in the protection of the back row, sinking into the comforting cave of the hoodie that covered her face, dark glasses shielding any chance of interaction or judgement, it was clear that Sienna meant every word.

Despite the laughter and music around her, Sienna stoically resisted joining the fun of the dance class, choosing instead to protect herself from the judgement she feared she would receive. We countered her self-doubt and fear with a simple but powerful message: no one is invisible here. With those five words, Sienna’s eyes were suddenly opened to the idea that her presence in that room mattered.

Over the course of the 8-week program, Sienna was transformed. The glasses came off to reveal sparkling, inquisitive eyes. The hoodie was pushed back to expose a warm and contagious smile. The spot in the back row was slowly abandoned in favor of an increasingly prominent position at the front of the room. Sienna became a leader among her peers, offering suggestions for improvement and giving hugs of encouragement.

By the day of the final performance, the Invisible Girl had disappeared. In her place was a vibrant, curious individual, confident that her presence matters, her life matters, and her voice is worthy of being heard.

Sienna is but one of many children whose lives the Dignity Institute strives to reach. We see this happen again and again, in many children, in many ways. Children who, once shown a path to dignity, can be inspired to stay in school, to find a career, and to choose to live respectfully. Invisible no more, they can become the person they were meant to be. We must act now, though. The alternative is much too grim.

When 60-70% of youth who drop out of school go to prison, we have a very short window to affect change. Breaking the cycle of crime and imprisonment is all too prevalent among our urban youth. This is why I have chosen to help The Dignity Institute because I can make a clear difference that will impact lives beyond my own.

Our challenges have been the same as any other grassroots organization. We refer to it as the "chick-and-egg" syndrome. How do you fund programming without outcomes and vice versa? We have worked hard to raise money through individual donations and now we are creating partnerships with for-profit organizations. By diversifying our funding, we are able to build our capacity. And, we now have outcomes to share.
 
We also have built a volunteer team that has helped us with our branding, website development, funder database, curriculum design and more. The Taproot organization has been a godsend. 
 
Seeing our progress on both the youth front and the infrastructure front inspire me every day to support this fine organization. 
 
 
 
 
 

Geographic Area Served

Local
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
We serve Greater Boston and plan to scale to New England once our funding supports expansion. Areas we have served include: Egleston Square, Roxbury; Dorchester; Chelsea; Charlestown; East Boston; downtown Boston; Jamaica Plain.  

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development-Business
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts & Culture
  3. Education - Adult Education

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Pathway to Profession

We are ready to launch this program, which is targeted to high school seniors who need to turn around failing grades, so they can graduate.We use positive hip hop, comprising dance, audio recording and spoken word to engage them in professional development activities, including life/leadership skill building; career exploration and job hunting preparation. At the end of this intensive school-year program, they will graduate with a portfolio of completed work and be connected to college or a career. We will also be providing coaches, mentors, social workers, access to a neighborhood health center if drug use is a problem, etc. Our curriculum uses the IP of our for-profit called SMART Conversations, which is an empowerment tool that focuses on self-responsibility, accountability, character-building, assertiveness, communication skills and emotional intelligence.We have trained more than 7,000 people in the public and private sector and are providing a free license to the Dignity Institute.
Budget  $100,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Minorities Offenders/Ex-Offenders At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
At the end of this 6-month program...
90% of participants will have successfully passed their Hi-Set exam
50% of participants will enter the workforce
15% of participants will engage in an internship 
35% will be accepted into college 
Program Long-Term Success  This program is in the planning stages. At this point, we are finalizing partnerships and fund raising. 
Program Success Monitored By 
We will employ the following tools:
1. Mentorship reports
2. Participant and Parental interviews
3. Proof of matriculation 
Examples of Program Success 
We have not launched this program yet. Although we are quite unique programs in the Arts/Education space have reported excellent results, In fact, one of our supporters, the former exec. director of The Egleston Square Y and the new Boston BCYF Commissioner, Will Morales, learned how to read and write through an innovative program while in prison through rap. He now has a Master's degree and is an inspirational figure in the community. 

SMART Conversations for Families & Nonprofits

More than 6,000 people have been trained in SMART Conversations® (SC), the language of learning, collaboration and organizational effectiveness. With SC on board, diverse people can “be” together, “talk” together, “think” together and “act” together with ease. Both our half-day and full-day workshops give people the opportunity to have open conversations in a safe environment that fosters inclusiveness. The SMART acronym stands for Shared Meaning- what are we talking about; Authenticity- can we be ‘real’ with each other? Respect- can we respect each other even when we have a difference of opinion; and Trust- can we give everyone involved in the conversation the benefit of the doubt? During the workshop, we also provide training on how to surface undiscussables—things people think and feel but are afraid or unwilling to say to one another. The content relies on work by noted organizational thought leaders like Stephen Covey, Peter Senge, David Bohm and Chris Argyris and is principled based, so it can be used in any circumstance.
Budget  $3,500.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Minorities At-Risk Populations Families
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of one 3-hour class, participants will exhibit more of a willingness to connect with and include others.  
Program Long-Term Success 
75-80 percent of the people will improve their outlook and attitude
80 percent will improve their listening skills 
 
 
Program Success Monitored By  More than 6000 people have taken SMART Conversations training. A post-survey reveals an average of a 95 approval rating in the excellent category.
Examples of Program Success 
One of our participants, a Manager at the State of MA, completely changed her look and her behavior. She said she did not realize how she came across to people and couldn't understand the negative reactions of others until she took our class. She reported making several personal and professional changes, which included updating her image by getting a hairstyle, losing 25 lbs., wearing makeup and taking pride in her appearance. She listened to her employees with greater empathy; spoke to them with greater sensitivity and relaxed her managerial style.
 
Another participant, a Construction Supervisor at a  large construction company near D,C came into our workshop swearing and behaving in a disrespectful, brash way. By the end of our class, he had calmed down considerably and made thoughtful contributions.. The next day, our HR contact told us he started to yell at her as he had in the past, then stopped himself and said "I can do better. Let me try again." He proceeded to speak to her calmly and respectfully. She told us the change was remarkable.
 
 
 
 
 

The 7th Element

The 7th Element teaches children in underserved communities life and leadership skills through the urban arts. We use the culturally relevant tool of "positive" hip hop, including Urban Dance, Songwriting/rap, Media, Art, DJ-ing and Fashion to inspire kids to learn and lead. What's unique about our program is SMART Conversations (SC), an empowerment tool that underpins all of the elements. SC focuses on trust-building, developing self-respect and showing respect, authenticity and understanding. It includes tools for conflict resolution, honest expression balanced with empathy and self-discovery learning about integrity, personal responsibility and good citizenship.
Budget  $20,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Extracurricular Arts & Culture
Population Served At-Risk Populations Children Only (5 - 14 years) Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 
At the end of our 8-10-week afterschool and summer programs, we expect...
85% of children to exhibit improved behavior that reduces their chances to get into trouble at school;
80% of children to improve their grades which improves their chances of staying in school
 
Program Long-Term Success  We have been in operation for since 2014  and, therefore, do not have long-term successes to point to at this early stage in our organization's history.
Program Success Monitored By   We use parental surveys and interviews.We also speak with summer camp and afterschool program counselors and obtain their feedback. Lastly, we interview the children, themselves, to find out what worked for them and how we can improve our program.
Examples of Program Success  The Godmother of one of the children who participated in one of our summer camp program was disruptive and disrespectful. About halfway through the program, he began taking on a leadership role. He would tell other students to quiet down;  line them up and ready them for dance routines; and, generally, help out the instructors. We later learned that during the following fall, he transformed from an average to a straight-A student. When his Godmother asked him why he had changed, he told her that learning was important and that he needed to focus om getting good grades, something our instructors emphasized. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Our SMART Conversations, an intellectual property of our for-profit company,  has been extremely successful in organizations over the past 15 years. We are offering it at no cost to The Dignity Institute because it is an empowerment tool that has the potential to help people change their lives, and we want to ensure access to underserved people. To make that happen, we need seed funding. Our programs are innovative, and culturally relevant. They speak to the people we cannot otherwise reach.We hope you will give serious consideration to supporting us. We won't let you down.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Michele Simos
CEO Term Start Jan 2014
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Michele Simos is the Executive Director of The Dignity Institute, a nonprofit that helps underserved people by empowering the human services organizations that serve them. the organization's signature program is The 7th Element, a program that teaches at-risk youth character- and relationship-building skills via the six elements of positive hip hop. Prior to The Dignity Institute, for almost two decades, Michele has facilitated business writing, presentation skills and SMART Conversations® workshops for corporations, the public sector and nonprofits through her own business. She is a certified facilitator of SMART Conversations®, a language technology that arms people with the skills they need to build and maintain strong relationships. She is also a professional coach. Clients served include: Fidelity, Kronos, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, Blue Cross Blue Shield, National Institutes of Health (NIH), The Mathworks, Turner Entertainment/Time Warner, EMC and Perkin Elmer. Prior to founding her business, Michele held management positions at Ernst & Young and Baxter Healthcare. At Ernst & Young, she served as Manager of Marketing Communications and Proposal Community Relations at a division of Baxter Healthcare. Most importantly, she served as the lead instructor and developer of a Professional Development and an English curriculum at a welfare-to-work college. The 12-16-month program placed graduates in good-paying jobs in accounting, medical, business and retail. It is this experience that inspired her to form The Dignity institute. Michele holds an M.A. degree in Professional Writing & Publishing from Emerson College and a B.A. degree in Journalism. She has written more than 150 articles and is the author of a forthcoming book on Diversity & Inclusion in organizations.
Co-CEO Mr. Paul Weisman
Co-CEO Term Start Jan 2014
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience Paul is a trainer, coach and management consultant with strong education and business credentials in each practice area. His signature training is SMART Conversations®, a continuous learning platform and catalyst for organizational change. Built on the research of Peter Senge, Daniel Goleman, David Bohm, Bill Isaacs and Stephen Covey, SMART Conversations® concepts, skills and principles empowers organizations to chart their own course and navigate change. As a Certified Professional CTI Co-Active Coach, CPCC, Paul helps clients get what they want by helping them challenge the status quo, shedding light on their blind spots and learning new skills to achieve high-value results. Career highlights  Master trainer, professional coach, and leadership/management consultant focused on achieving high organizational performance.  Former Chief Operating Officer and executive within a national engineering company.  Professional engineer/business leader for 34 years with two degrees in civil engineering A professional engineer and business leader by trade, Paul has two degrees in Civil Engineering from the University of Michigan and the University of Massachusetts. He has 34 years of consulting engineering experience and an extensive background developing, leading and managing major projects, teams, and business startups; strategic and business planning and business development; and corporate and operational leadership and management. Former Board positions  Woodard & Curran - Board of Directors  Race Road Condo Trust  American Council of Engineering Companies Community organizations:  Courageous Sailing  Boys & Girls Clubs of Charlestown

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Michele Simos Executive Director and Pres. Michele's career spans 25 years. During that time, she has held several positions in management in corporations like Baxter and Ernst & Young. She has also started two successful businesses, a writing company and a training organization. Michele also spent three years as an Instructor for a Boston college that focused on getting young adults off of welfare and into the job market. She created a Professional Development curriculum and taught English and Entrepreneurship, which is where her passion for helping youth succeed began to take shape.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2017
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 1
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Michele Simos
Board Chair Company Affiliation The Dignity Institute
Board Chair Term Jan 2014 -
Board Co-Chair Ms. Michele Simos
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation The Dignity Institute
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Kristie Bell The Dignity Institute --
Mr. Mike Chamblain Sports Management Voting
Ms. Maria Latimore Maria Latimore Group Voting
Mr. Harry Lohr The Dignity Institute --
Ms. Michele Simos Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Volunteer

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $15,000.00
Projected Expense $10,000.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990-EZ

2015 Form 990-EZ

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $6,486 $6,750 $5,050
Total Expenses $2,652 $4,935 $1,915

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$6,486 $5,000 $5,050
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- $1,750 --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $2,652 $4,270 $1,800
Administration Expense -- $665 $115
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 2.45 1.37 2.64
Program Expense/Total Expenses 100% 87% 94%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $8,641 $1,815 $3,135
Current Assets $8,641 $1,815 $3,135
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $8,641 $1,815 $3,135

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $0.00
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? 0.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities inf inf inf

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above for FY16 and FY15 is per the organization's IRS Form 990-EZ, with additional details per the Form PCs on file with the state of MA. Data for FY14 is per the nonprofit's records.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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