Share |

Center to Support Immigrant Organizing

 NonProfit Center, 89 South Street, Suite 203
 Boston, MA 02111
[P] (617) 742-5165
[F] (617) 5232070
http://www.csioboston.org
[email protected]
Luz Zambrano
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1999
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2261109

LAST UPDATED: 09/21/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

CSIO supports and develops the work of individuals, groups, and communities dedicated to organizing immigrants around the issues that affect their lives. Our goal is to help immigrants in the forefront of community and workplace struggles to develop their power and leadership not only to succeed in their immediate context, but also to contribute to the broader effort to build a more just and democratic society.

Mission Statement

CSIO supports and develops the work of individuals, groups, and communities dedicated to organizing immigrants around the issues that affect their lives. Our goal is to help immigrants in the forefront of community and workplace struggles to develop their power and leadership not only to succeed in their immediate context, but also to contribute to the broader effort to build a more just and democratic society.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $173,363.00
Projected Expense $168,981.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Grassroots Leadership Institute and Network
  • Immigrant E.D. Support Initiative
  • Immigrant Youth Leadership & Solidarity
  • Network of Immigrant & African American Solidarity

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

CSIO supports and develops the work of individuals, groups, and communities dedicated to organizing immigrants around the issues that affect their lives. Our goal is to help immigrants in the forefront of community and workplace struggles to develop their power and leadership not only to succeed in their immediate context, but also to contribute to the broader effort to build a more just and democratic society.

Background Statement

CSIO was founded in 1999 in response to an assessment of the barriers to organizing for social and economic justice in immigrant communities in the greater Boston area. The heart of CSIO’s work has been to help community leaders and groups develop the grassroots leadership of people whom the organization serves - individuals who seek assistance and community members impacted by the group's work.

Since 1999, we have developed various initiatives within this framework. We have built strong relationships with immigrant communities and organizations and developed collaborative projects across communities. Through these projects, individuals and groups share resources, learn from each other, and advance immigrant social change and capacity building together.

Almost across the board, despite the restrictions of CSIO’s size and capacity, we have heard that our work is important to the work of social justice in general and social justice for immigrant communities in particular. The components of our work that people find most critical include:

· modeling and teaching democratic, participatory, facilitative process;

· opening spaces for cross community dialogue and relationship building;

· addressing the intersection of service and social change work;

· creating opportunities for and building skills to do root cause analysis (understanding the why)[i];

· a focus on the “how to” of grassroots leadership development;

· opportunities to learn and feel supported; feeling valued and part of a community as they learn more about the work they do;

· supporting models that offer an alternative to the one or two person leadership models that dominate the leadership framework;

· offering ways to break down the competitive divide between organizations and communities;

· engaging people across difference, especially in this current context, as critical work.


Impact Statement

Accomplishments:

- provided multi-session Grassroots Leadership Institute & Network workshops to over 90 immigrant activists, leaders and staff, helping them build community and organizational leadership skills

 

- finished participatory evaluation of first 5 years of Network of Immigrant and African American Solidarity (NIAAS) program, and launched NIAAS support project for Bromley Heath BHA Tenant Task Force and Black Lives Matter Boston

 

- launched Immigrant E.D. support initiative, involving a cohort of 7 immigrant E.D.’s of greater Boston grassroots groups which meet to address shared challenges in building sustainable, grassroots-led organizations that build community and improve society.

 

- held second annual immigrant high school leadership summit and summer leadership program that reached over 100 immigrant youth from Latino, Chinese, African & Caribbean communities

 

- provided organizational development support for grassroots Latino organization to help it launch and develop a community organizing program

 

Goals:

- facilitate leadership series for board members of statewide organizing network, helping chapters increase board leadership; provide multi-session leadership trainings to public housing leaders to help them improve developments

 

- help public housing leaders bring together immigrant and African American public housing residents for greater unity and to increase community resources

 

- improve leadership capacity of 7 immigrant E.D.s to better lead organizations in management systems, leadership structures, board development strategies and other E.D. work areas

 

- help Latino grassroots group develop & implement organizing strategy to re-orient from services to leadership framework

 

- train multi-ethnic leadership team 8 teens to lead neighborhood exchanges and workshops on facilitation, the roots of global migration & the African American legacy in Boston with 80-100 Chinese, Latino, African and Caribbean youth


Needs Statement

Fund development: because CSIO works exclusively with smaller, grassroots-led non-profits, which are themselves stretched for resources, revenue from fees for service is scarce. Also, there are very few avenues for foundation support for intermediary organizations – even those that support grassroots groups that they fund. While CSIO develops programs based off of community and grassroots organizational capacity building needs, this alignment is not valued by most major funders that support grassroots groups.

 

Communication and documentation: CSIO has not had the resources to document and share its impact in the field of capacity building. When we share our lessons learned with national capacity building groups, we realize that we are unique in that we are working directly with grassroots groups and leaders, not just researching and studying them. Yet because we do not have adequate documentation and communication resources, we are unable to document unique and vital learnings in the field, nor lift up the voices of grassroots leaders and groups themselves to articulate their own capacity building and grassroots leadership strategies and needs.

CEO Statement

For all of its fifteen years of work, CSIO has focused on supporting immigrant organizers, leaders, directors, activists and their organizations to overcome barriers to achieving social, political and economic justice for immigrant communities. Our focus for much of this history has been on promoting the leadership of those “most affected” by injustice in immigrant communities in these struggles for justice. This focus has resulted in our centering our program work on four core components that we believe are critical to the process of developing grassroots leadership:

  • democratic, participatory process
  • ongoing opportunities to analyze the root causes of social/political/economic injustice – building the understanding of the “why”
  • opportunities for and access to direct experience of collective impact; and
  • structures and processes for involvement in decision-making.

 

While we continue to support and include community based immigrant organizations that already do organizing in our program work, we are working more and more with smaller grassroots organizations that are newer to organizing and often less well connected, but are looking for ways to build community engagement and organizing approaches into their work.

 

CSIO advocates for a “multiple strategy” approach to skills building and capacity development in immigrant communities. Experience has shown us that in order to increase skills and change practice, people need not only training, but onsite support (coaching, mentoring, etc.) in order to implement what is learned within their organizations and communities. In addition, we believe that opportunities to learn, strategize and build relationships across communities and issues are critical. If networks of groups and leaders who share a similar mission can be nurtured and maintained, they offer critical spaces for joint analysis, connection and mutual support. CSIO has been able to convene and support these kind of spaces in an ongoing way in the past and we have found that in addition to the above mentioned benefit, these kinds of cross community networks often help seed and incubate collective efforts which magnify the impact of social justice efforts. 


Board Chair Statement

(Note: Third Sector New England (TSNE) is the fiscal sponsor of Center to Support Immigrant Organizing, so legally TSNE’s board is CSIO’s. Instead of relying on TSNE’s board for community leadership, CSIO forms advisory groups of constituents to oversee programs and initiatives. Yamilet Torres is a leader in 3 CSIO program areas, and explains her leadership below).

 

I am a public housing tenant at Bromley Heath. I was referred to CSIO’s Grassroots Leadership Initiative (GLI) in 2012 by a resource manager at my development. Though I had never taken leadership in an organized group in my community previously, I decided to take the GLI workshops. I was surprised and excited to find that I could be a leader in my community. I got training and a lot of support and confidence from CSIO. I shared my own leadership insights with many other grassroots leaders at the GLI and learned a lot from them.

 

After the 5 training sessions of the GLI ended, CSIO called me because its partner, JPNDC, was doing door to door outreach at my development. JPNDC was trying to get residents to run for a new Tenant Task Force. BHA had just dissolved the previous one, TMC. There was a lot of conflict about it. There was a lot of tension at the development, and a lot of it was racial, and between newcomers and longer term residents.

 

I decided to get involved and test out my new leadership skills. I did a lot of volunteer work to help JPNDC organize an election process to form a new TTF. After almost a year of door knocking, community meetings and education, we held elections. I ran for the TTF, and was elected myself.

 

Over the past 4 years since I graduated from the GLI, I have stayed involved in CSIO – taking other CSIO workshops that bring together people like me from around Boston to continue to build our leadership and solidarity. I have been bringing other TTF members to these wonderful workshops, where we learn from others as much as we learn from CSIO and presenters. These sessions draw out our best ideas out and we share them. They are engaging, exciting and educational.

 

After a rocky but successful 2 years of the new TTF, I was asked by other leaders to run for TTF President in the recent elections. I ran and won. I am now the TTF President, and I see the needs that our TTF has for leadership support. For many of those needs, I talked to TTF members about having CSIO come in to support us, because CSIO provides support at organizations as well as in meetings across the city.

 

So in early 2016 we brought in CSIO to our TTF to talk about how CSIO support could help us, given our needs. We decided to ask CSIO to provide:

-        NIAAS workshops that would bring immigrants and African Americans together to break down barriers and build practices where together we could better build our community

-        A GLI at Bromley for the TTF and other tenant leaders, especially to help these leaders improve their facilitation skills, build stronger member leadership, and do better outreach to the whole community at Bromley.

-        Support for our youth leaders, from CSIO’s summer immigrant teen leadership initiative.

 

I am excited that what I learned and got supported with at CSIO can be shared back now in my community.

 


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Greater Boston, with a focus on City of Boston neighborhoods comprised predominantly of communities of color, as well as Chelsea, Lynn, Revere, Cambridge, Somerville and Malden. CSIO also supports the work of groups in Brockton, New Bedford/Fall River, Worcester, Springfield, and Providence, RI.

Organization Categories

  1. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C.
  2. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Intergroup/Race Relations
  3. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Grassroots Leadership Institute and Network

Grassroots Leadership Institute (GLI) is a multi-session curriculum on the ‘how-to’s’ of developing grassroots leadership in organizing efforts like campaigns and organizations. Curriculum consists of facilitation, development of member-led organizations, operational and strategic planning, campaigns and root cause analysis. Other sessions include budget and fund raising, framing services and education with organizing goals, board, staff and member roles and leadership strategies. GLIs are now tied to concrete community and organizational leadership strategies with 3 communities, in FY’17 Mass Community Action Network (MCAN), Brockton Interfaith Committee, Agencia ALPHA and Bromley Heath Tenant Task Force.


Grassroots Leadership Network (GLN) provides capacity-build workshops to graduates of the CSIO’s GLI. Sessions in late 2015 and 2016 addressed the roots of global migration and local immigrant community poverty.

Budget  $70,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Immigrants' Rights
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success  Increased capacity of participants as leaders and organizers in cultivating grassroots leadership in organizations and community change efforts.
Program Long-Term Success  Changes in organizations that result in deeper and broader grassroots leadership from communities. Greater social change impact in the work of organizations.
Program Success Monitored By  We conduct interviews at periodic junctures to document what practices learned at the GLI have become implemented in groups, communities and participants' own practices. We evaluate each training at the end with the whole group, and ask for feedback to improve the following session.
Examples of Program Success 
Grads have developed structures in their organizations that they learned about at GLI. Participants have developed membership systems, planning processes, board and volunteer leadership structures, and program changes that reflect their learning in the GLI. These changes have resulted in concrete improvements in achieving missions. Furthermore, the relationships built in these sessions have lead to increased mutual support in the community, where groups and communities have crossed neighborhoods and issues to support fellow immigrant leaders from the GLI.

Immigrant E.D. Support Initiative

CSIO coordinates a cohort of 7 immigrant E.D.’s of grassroots groups who first met in April 2016 to confront together the shared challenges facing newer E.D.’s to grassroots groups. These groups include:

-        Women Encouraging Empowerment (Revere)

-        Lynn Worker Center

-        Brockton Interfaith Committee/Mass Community Action Network

-        Beantown Society

-        The City School

-        Agencia ALPHA (South End)

-        Vietnamese-American Civic Association

 

CSIO will provide peer learning opportunities among the participating E.D.’s to share best practices around building sustainable, grassroots-led organizations. We will bring in experienced colleagues for advice, provide trainings on infrastructure areas that groups need to bolster, and strategize with groups about potentially developing shared systems among the cohort in order to reduce administrative work, avoid duplication, and be better able to focus on the grassroots organizing mission-based work.
Budget  $65,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Organizational Development & Training
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of the first year, E.D.'s will trust each other to begin to develop shared systems and projects together. E.D.'s will have bolstered their management capacity in order to solve short-term challenges in their organizations, and create community led structures to do so.
Program Long-Term Success 
Immigrant E.D.'s will have developed more fully staffed and sustainable organizations, led by the community and consisting of a solid infrastructure and impactful programming in the community.
 
 
Immigrant E.D.s will have developed shared systems that bolster each group's work: for instance, collaborative fund raising, the hiring of a 'circuit rider' in areas such as web-site development, bookkeeping, etc. These supports help E.D.'s reduce administrative burden and deepen the impact of the work in the community.
Program Success Monitored By  The cohort and CSIO's 2 Co-Directors guide and oversee the project. We use written evaluations at the end of meetings, phone interviews and annual evaluation meetings as a cohort.
Examples of Program Success  Group formed in April 2016 so no results yet.

Immigrant Youth Leadership & Solidarity

CSIO runs a summer immigrant youth program that involves teens from CPA/CYI, Margarita Muñiz Academy, ACEDONE, Bromley Heath, and Hispanic Youth Leadership Association. CSIO trains a team of 8 youth leaders in from these groups in participatory facilitation skills and root cause analysis, and then support the team to facilitate workshops and networking activities with 80-100 youth in participating organizations.

Budget  $40,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Adolescents Only (13-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Annually, 8 youth grow their facilitation, root cause analysis, organizing and other leadership skills that they bring back to their grassroots groups and schools. Youth build understanding and shed prejudice regarding other immigrant communities with whom they do not currently engage.
Program Long-Term Success 
Grassroots groups that organize immigrant youth will improve their leadership capacity via youth trained by CSIO in the practices of participatory facilitation, cross community relationship building, root cause analysis and organizing. Groups and youth will be better able to organize youth in their communities for social change.
 
 
Youth will maintain relationships across race, leading to collaborative and united efforts to improve communities and schools. Chinese, Latino, African and Caribbean youth solidarity leads to less tension, prejudice and divisions in schools and neighborhoods.
Program Success Monitored By 
CSIO conductes evaluations at the end of all workshops and activities with youth. We evaluate the workshops and activities with the youth leadership team, including a final evaluation of all summer activities and leadership structures. We use part of this process to plan the following summer together with the youth.
 
We also work with participating grassroots groups to support the ongoing leadership of participants in their schools and communities after the summer. 
 
 
Examples of Program Success  Grassroots groups excited to expand summer program with CSIO, involve greater number of youth. Huge increase in youth applications for the 8 peer leader positions. Articulation of participants in interviews about having reduced prejudice and increased understanding about challenges and modes of leadership of different communities.

Network of Immigrant & African American Solidarity

NIAAS is a community-based initiative led by people of color to build solidarity between African Americans and immigrants of colors through dialogue, relationship-building, outreach, education and action. NIAAS 2016 activities include work with Bromley Heath Tenant Task Force and Black Lives Matter Boston, where we will use and share our tools (popular theater, storytelling, ‘traveling museum of the African Diaspora,’ and others) that tear down stereotypes and open honest dialogue. We hold community-based dialogues and education where we help groups find common ground in order to overcome the racial barriers that impede success.

Budget  $80,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Ethnic Groups' Rights & Racial Equality
Population Served Blacks, African Heritage Hispanic, Latino Heritage Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

NIAAS community workshops at Bromley Heath help African American and immigrant residents articulate and take pride in their own identities and community legacies. Residents see values, strengths, resources and power in the struggles and legacies of different populations at the development. Workshops lead to greater unity among communities, and a better understanding by TTF members about how to build inclusive leadership structures and initiatives. TTF and Safety Committee members, trained in popular education tools, use them at TTF community-wide meetings and activities.

 

Work with Black Lives Matter Boston would bring increased clarity for the role of immigrants in Black Lives Matter, and greater solidarity among people of color within and for Black Lives Matter, heightening its breadth and impact.

Program Long-Term Success 

Longer term goals that emerged from the recently completed 5-year evaluation include:

• Develop clarity about NIAAS’s identity as an educational or leadership development entity.

• Define clear elements of NIAAS’s model for building solidarity between immigrants of color and African Americans.

• Engage a more diverse set of immigrants of color and bring more young people to events.

• Explore various forms for the work in order to broaden the audience and expands NIAAS’ reach, such as a coalition, a network, a membership organization, or a train- the-trainer identity;

• Develop ways to establish long-term relationships with more participants, so that engagement goes beyond an event;

• Identify the capacities necessary to be a facilitator of NIAAS’ work and offer training for those who are interested;

• Utilize the skills and connections within the Core Group or among long time leaders to improve outreach.

Program Success Monitored By 

In the late spring 2014 NIAAS hired consultant Curdina Hill and Kevin Ferreira to help us evaluate NIAAS and document its impact over its first 5 years. Kevin and Curdina worked with NIAAS staff and Core Group members to design and implement an evaluation process, which included dozens of interviews with participants and group assessment meetings. The final report was finished and shared in November 2015.

 

NIAAS’ Core Group continues to document the impact that NIAAS has had on community organizations. The Core Group facilitates and evaluates all community activities, and conducts a year-end evaluation that it uses to plan the coming year.

Examples of Program Success 

In the period of its implementation, NIAAS significantly increased its outreach and participant engagement, tripling the number of community leaders involved from 60 at its launch in 2011 to 189 by the end of 2014. All participants interviewed responded that NIAAS’s work was valuable and unique. They said that the tools they learned and the dialogues they engaged in contributed to building relationships between African Americans and immigrants of color. A number of these tools, such as migration mapping or the participatory timeline, created spaces for storytelling. Most respondents spoke to the great power of this storytelling to create trust, understanding, and connection between these communities.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The following brief summary emerged from a 2015 planning process that CSIO conducted with leaders, participants and allies:

 

1)      Pieces of CSIO’s work that resonate with grassroots groups and leaders

Almost across the board, despite the restrictions of CSIO’s size and capacity, we have heard that our work is important to the work of social justice in general and social justice for immigrant communities in particular. The components of our work that people find most critical include:

· modeling and teaching democratic, participatory, facilitative process;

· opening spaces for cross community dialogue and relationship building;

· creating opportunities for and building skills to do root cause analysis (understanding the why);

· a focus on the “how” of grassroots leadership development;

· opportunities to learn and feel supported; feeling valued and part of a community as they learn more about the work they do;

· supporting models that offer an alternative to the one or two person leadership models that dominate and receive funding;

· offering ways to break down the competitive divide between organizations and communities;

· addressing the intersection of service and social change work;

· engaging people across difference, especially in this current context, as critical work.

 

2)      Key challenges for CSIO

-Grassroots organizations and those who support them both lack resources. Larger funders want to fund larger intermediaries. CSIO’s work, which involves direct work with grassroots organizations, suffers resource barriers similar to those faced by grassroots groups.

-Articulating the impact of capacity building is difficult. We must rely on episodic, anecdotal stories. It is often a struggle to isolate impact from particular interventions.

-CSIO needs to raise its visibility and figure out how to de-mystify and simplify proof of its impact. It is a necessary part of the work.

-CSIO needs to build its communications and digital capacity.  

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Luz Zambrano
CEO Term Start Jan 2000
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Luz Zambrano has worked as a worker organizer for the Immigrant Rights Advocacy, Training and Education (I.R.A.T.E.) Project (later Immigrant Worker Resource Center – IWRC), an immigration counselor for the American Red Cross, and as a legal advocate Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE), where she helped organize and advocate for thousands of immigrants. Luz worked as the Education and Training Specialist for the Mass AFL-CIO. She led and wrote research in studies that analyzed the barriers to recruitment and retention of organizers of color (sponsored by the Hyams Foundation), and the effects of the Workforce Investment Act on Boston’s immigrant communities (sponsored by UMASS Boston). Luz’ volunteer leadership includes a 4-year term as Board President of the East Boston Ecumenical Community Council, membership on Massachusetts Coalition for Health and Safety (Mass COSH)’s Board of Directors, on the Work Environment Justice Fund’s Advisory Board, and the President of the East Boston Early Learning Center’s Parent Council. Luz currently serves as Board member of the East Boston-based Network for Cooperative Development, a network of worker-run co-ops in the Latino community. Luz won the prestigious Philanthropic Initiative (TPI) Award in 2004.
Co-CEO Mr. Kevin Whalen
Co-CEO Term Start Jan 2000
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience
Over a decade of work with the East Boston Ecumenical Community Council, Kevin Whalen served as Coordinator of Tenant and Housing Organizing, and then Executive Director. As an organizer, Kevin led multi-ethnic organizing efforts within and among four immigrant populations. As Director, Kevin managed EBECC’s growth into an immigrant-led community organization that wove immigration, ESL, youth, family support and housing services and advocacy into a community organizing framework.
 
Kevin led and wrote research in studies that analyzed the barriers to recruitment and retention of organizers of color (sponsored by the Hyams Foundation), and the effects of the Workforce Investment Act on Boston’s immigrant communities (sponsored by UMASS Boston). He was the interim Director and organizing and development consultant for the BHA Commonwealth Tenants Association. He has provided facilitation, organizational development and grant writing consulting to over a dozen organizations. Kevin’s current affiliations include serving as Board member of Southern Jamaica Plain Community Health Center, and the Centre for Faith, Art and Justice. In the past, Kevin was a member of the Site Council and Parent Council of the BPS Rafael Hernandez School in Roxbury, Jobs With Justice’s Executive Committee, The Labor Page’s Editorial Board, and the Boston Parents Organizing Network’s founding Steering Committee. Kevin won the prestigious Philanthropic Initiative (TPI) Award in 2006.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Ann Philbin Jan 2000 Jan 2016

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Trina Jackson NIAAS Co-Coordinator Put in description later

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Yanming Guo Memorial Award EzeSoft Charity Fund Corporation 2014

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 35
Number of Contract Staff 6
Staff Retention Rate % 92%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? N/A
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Jeannette Huezo
Board Chair Company Affiliation United for a Fair Economy
Board Chair Term Jan 2006 - Dec 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Adanarys Barragan Beantown Society Voting
Renato Castelo MAPC Voting
Fatou Fatty Women Encouraging Empowerment Voting
Shaun Glaze Boston University Voting
Juan Gonzalez JPNDC Voting
Dolores Alleyene Goode Lesley College Voting
Mathew Goode Environmentalist-Suffolk County Voting
Ms. Jeannette Huezo United for a Fair Economy Voting
Isabel Lopez Brockton Interfaith Committee Voting
Joel McCall Reidren Group Voting
Gloria Namugaya Women Encouraging Empowerment Voting
Myriam Ortiz City School Voting
Julio Ruíz Lynn Worker Center Voting
Patricia Sobalvorro Agencia ALPHA Voting
Thuan Tran Vietnamese-American Civic Association Voting
Ferai Williams Art and Theater consultant Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 9
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 9
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 85%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 20%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Because TSNE is CSIO's fiscal sponsor, legally CSIO is accountable to TSNE's board of directors. However, CSIO organizers advisory committees of constituents/program participants to lead CSIO and its programs. We have listed out members of CSIO's Immigrant E.D. network, which guide this project, and the Core Group of Network of Immigrant and African American Solidarity (NIAAS), which lead NIAAS activities and planning processes.
 
 
Finally, Jeannette Huezo of United for a Fair Economy has been CSIO's long time organizational advisor. We listed her as board chair because she fulfills the central advisory role to CSIO staff.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $173,363.00
Projected Expense $168,981.00
Form 990s

2014 TSNE Form 990

2013 TSNE Form 990

2012 TSNE Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 TSNE Financial Statement

2014 TSNE Financial Statement

2013 TSNE Financial Statement

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $99,522 $343,467 $247,523
Total Expenses $217,346 $207,737 $204,539

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$52,500 $282,000 $196,405
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $3,050 $1,695 $2,495
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $36,398 $52,688 $40,888
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues $350 $595 $980
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $7,224 $6,489 $6,755

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $170,808 $163,725 $156,920
Administration Expense $26,538 $25,512 $25,119
Fundraising Expense $20,000 $18,500 $22,500
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.46 1.65 1.21
Program Expense/Total Expenses 79% 79% 77%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 36% 7% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $116,742 $228,767 $89,986
Current Assets $101,044 $218,870 $83,140
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $15,698 $9,897 $6,846
Total Net Assets $101,046 $218,870 $83,140

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? 0.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 6.44 22.11 12.14

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Please note that the current fiscal year budget is Center to Support Immigrant Organizing's, while the Audit and 990s are TSNE's (which is CSIO's fiscal sponsor).

Foundation Comments

Center to Support Immigrant Organizing (CSIO) is fiscally sponsored by Third Sector New England Inc. (TSNE). As such, the Form 990 and audit files posted above are per TSNE. Financial summary data in charts and graphs above reflects CSIO and is per the supplementary section of TSNE's audited financials, with additional functional expense breakout detail and asset & liability detail provided by CSIO.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

CSIO’s goal is to build the capacity of leaders, organizations and communities to develop grassroots leadership to improve communities and create a more just society. We support people directly impacted by social injustice to take leadership in organizations and community improvement struggles, and come together across communities and issues to:

-        learn best practices about grassroots leadership strategies that result in impactful change

-        break down divisions that prevent communities from tackling social and economic challenges together

-        build relationships and develop cross-cultural and cross-issue organizations and strategies that deepen and reinforce individual organizational and community efforts.

 

For all of its 15 years of work, CSIO has focused on supporting immigrant organizers, leaders, directors and their organizations to overcome barriers to achieving social, political and economic justice for immigrant communities. Our focus for much of this history has been on promoting the leadership of those “most affected” by injustice in immigrant communities in these struggles for justice. At this juncture in our organizational evolution, this focus has resulted in our centering our program work on four core components that we believe are critical to the process of developing grassroots leadership:

  • democratic, participatory process
  • ongoing opportunities to analyze the root causes of social injustice – building the understanding of the “why”
  • opportunities for and access to direct experience of collective impact; and
  • structures and processes for involvement in decision-making.

 

While we continue to support and include community based immigrant organizations that already do organizing, we are working more and more with smaller grassroots organizations that are newer to organizing and often less well connected, but are looking for ways to build community engagement and organizing approaches into their work.

 

CSIO advocates for a “multiple strategy” approach to skills building and capacity development in immigrant communities. Experience has shown us that in order to increase skills and change practice, people need not only training, but also onsite support (coaching, mentoring, etc.) in order to implement what is learned within their organizations and communities. In addition, we believe that opportunities to learn, strategize and build relationships across communities and issues are critical. If networks of groups and leaders who share a similar mission can be nurtured and maintained, they offer critical spaces for joint analysis, connection and mutual support. CSIO has been able to convene and support these kind of spaces in an ongoing way in the past and we have found that these kinds of cross community networks often help seed and incubate collective efforts which magnify the impact of social justice efforts. 

 

It is important to look at CSIO’s work in the context of recent events that renew a deep call for racial justice. In our planning processes (see below) people have been reminding us that convening cross community dialogues, trainings, and initiatives is a key intervention to support growing capacity to “work powerfully across difference,” a cornerstone to the achievement of social justice.

 

Representatives from intermediary groups that share our vision and values and do related work on a national scale said that the individual model for leadership, organizational models for change, and campaign-focused models for organizing still dominate. But what CSIO creates is the “connective tissue” of all this work, that which holds it all together.   The approaches we are creating space for – cross-community, dialogue-oriented, facilitative, democratic, participatory, networked - are helping create the conditions for an evolution to a more collaborative, networked, open, bottom-up kind of change process.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

1) CSIO has heard from many immigrant Executive Directors of grassroots-led organizations about shared challenges in building sustainable, impactful organizations. Once a level of organizational development is achieved that requires greater infrastructure – management, financial and governance systems, sustainable and growing funding streams, etc. – groups often reach a ceiling of growth, leading to leader burn-out and other crises that imperil the work.

 

CSIO has formed an initial cohort of 7 immigrant E.D.’s of grassroots groups who first met in April 2016 to confront these shared challenges together. These groups include Women Encouraging Empowerment (Revere), Lynn Worker Center, Brockton Interfaith Committee/Mass Community Action Network, Beantown Society, The City School, Agencia ALPHA (South End), Vietnamese-American Civic Association. CSIO will provide peer learning opportunities among the participating E.D.’s to share content & best practices.

 

2) GLIs, multi-session curriculum on the ‘how-to’s’ of developing grassroots leadership in organizing efforts like campaigns and organizations, are now tied to concrete community and organizational leadership strategies with 3 communities. We are currently facilitating a leadership training series with board members of Mass Community Action Network (MCAN) and its chapters. We are helping leaders clarify and improve their roles as both board members and campaign leaders within MCAN and affiliates.

 

We are also supporting Agencia ALPHA with the development of organizational leadership structures that move ALPHA’s focus from services and education to community organizing. We held 2015 GLI’s in the South End hosted by ALPHA, and our work this year is to help leaders of the group implement GLI learnings in its own organization and community work.

 

Finally, we will begin a training institute with the Bromley Heath Tenant Task Force, to build democratic, participatory and inclusive TTF leadership structures, in part to deal with existing tensions among long term and newer leaders.

 

NIAAS develops and shares tools that unite immigrants and African American communities. NIAAS will hold community gatherings with the Bromley Heath TTF and the Bromley Heath resident-led Safety Committee to address the prejudices, stereotypes and other barriers that exist between newer immigrants and longer term residents at the development. NIAAS will provide trainings, coaching and other activities that raise up the identities, histories and cultural resources that each population brings to the Bromley community. NIAAS has also started conversations with leaders of Black Lives Matter Boston to share tools that will address the role of immigrants of color in the movement.

 

 

1) We will train and develop a multi-ethnic leadership team of 5 immigrant high school students and 3 college-aged mentors in facilitation skills, democratic decision-making practices and root cause analysis. This team will lead all the summer program multi-ethnic group activities.

 

2) We will provide workshops on facilitation, the roots of global migration and the African American legacy in Boston to the Chinese, Latino, African and Caribbean youth involved in the summer program.

 

3) We will organize neighborhood/community exchanges and learning opportunities that demonstrate the power of grassroots leadership to address social injustice, increase community resources and promote community well being.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

CSIO’s most critical resource is its high level of constituent leadership in programs and initiatives. We model what we are trying to accomplish: bringing people impacted by social injustice together to form plans to address challenges, form goals and accomplish them. Program participants guide our program initiatives. A team of 7 immigrant E.D.’s, who together decide on agendas, trainings and shared projects, lead the Immigrant E.D. Support Initiative. A team of diverse immigrant high school youth leaders, who shape and lead activities that increase youth leadership and community change, lead the Youth program. Participants shape our GLI, GLN and organizational development initiatives. We form planning committees that are representative of participants and organizations, and together meet to define agendas that CSIO offers or facilitates.

 

NIAAS is the best example of involving community leaders in developing and delivering the initiative. NIAAS' structure reflects a vision for decision-making led by those who are directly impacted by racism. The two NIAAS coordinators, an immigrant and African American, work with the Core Group and broad NIAAS membership to develop and implement the initiative. We maintain a collective decision-making structure and support participants to develop their leadership through leading the sessions and activities themselves. NIAAS’ Core Group consists of 8 -10 African American and immigrant leaders who meet bi-monthly to plan and evaluate NIAAS and who co-facilitate all NIAAS community activities. Core Group members lead all NIAAS planning and evaluation activities, do outreach to the broader community and build NIAAS' profile.

 

CSIO is structured to draw out and share community expertise across communities and issues. Over the years, many organizers, Directors and leaders doing grassroots leadership for social change have provided resources for CSIO’s work. We draw upon grassroots organizing groups with strong practices in our topics to give presentations on their work, and then CSIO engages participants in dialogues and analysis of the practice.

 

CSIO staff consists of 2 Co-Directors and a NIAAS Co-Coordinator, who have decades of experience in community organizing, program and organizational development, network development and capacity building. CSIO employs summer youth staff from the leadership of grassroots communities with whom we work, and a communications consultant who is a longtime NIAAS leader. Finally, CSIO counts on young adult immigrant leaders who work with CSIO as volunteers, student interns and part-time staff or consultants to support CSIO's development. 4 college-aged immigrant interns help support and mentor the immigrant teens involved in the summer youth program.

 

Third Sector New England (TSNE) serves as our fiscal sponsor and contributes in-kind donations, including subsidized office rental space and systems. CSIO and TSNE have been collaborating over the past four years around capacity building work. CSIO provided staffing and consultant support to TSNE to help shape, develop, document and evaluate two major grant programs, the Capacity Building Fund and Inclusion Initiative. These experiences help articulate our own practice for the larger non-profit field. As a fiscal sponsor, TSNE's Board oversees CSIO along with 30+ other fiscally sponsored groups. In practice, because CSIO has minimal contact with TSNE's Board, CSIO organizes coordinating committees, advisory boards and other leadership bodies from the communities that are involved in initiatives & programs.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

While those participating in programs come together regularly to evaluate impact of the work, we conduct more formal assessments of the impact of our work periodically. This past year, we conducted a 5-year external assessment of NIAAS, and a staff-led assessment of CSIO’s work with key immigrant leaders and allies. We measure our impact both quantitatively and qualitatively – by the breadth of participants who are active in our programs and by the impact of our support on their community leadership. In the coming year, specific measurement targets include:

Grassroots Leadership Institutes

GLI sessions reach over 50 leaders and organizers. Participants increase their understanding about how to develop grassroots leadership in their organizations, campaigns and other community efforts. Participants bring lessons learned back to organizations and campaign or community committees, strengthening the leadership structures of groups and making their work more impactful and sustainable.

 

MCAN newer board members, most of whom are immigrants and other people of color, increase their capacity to lead MCAN and its affiliates. Bromley Heath leaders increase their capacity to facilitate democratic and participatory meetings, leading to leadership structures that draw in more residents to TTF leadership and build more unity among African Americans and immigrants. Leadership sessions help the TTF improve its work to develop the youth leadership group and family outreach systems.

Agencia ALPHA community committees take leadership for ALPHA in campaigns to support undocumented residents. 8-12 new leaders join these efforts, leading to stronger campaign work in the Safe Driving Coalition and related efforts. ALPHA moves away from previous client-management based approach that had consumed its time and prohibited development of strong leadership systems. Staff support the leadership of community members in ALPHA across programs, strengthening campaign work and broadening ALPHA’s community leadership internally.

 

NIAAS community-based leadership development

NIAAS community workshops at Bromley Heath help African American and immigrant residents articulate and take pride in their own identities and community legacies. Residents see the values, strengths, resources and power in the struggles and legacies of different populations at the development. Workshops lead to greater unity among communities, and a better understanding by TTF members about how to build inclusive leadership structures and initiatives.

Immigrant Youth Program

80 immigrant youth increase understanding of root cause analysis, the African American struggle in Boston and the U.S. since slavery, economic and political causes of migration worldwide, and how each youth’s family and community migration stories relate to these global patterns, & how youth can take leadership in community struggles to improve their community well being

 

5 youth on youth leadership team develop skills in facilitating meetings, speaking in public, bringing youth together across differences, using popular education tools to draw out participation, doing root cause analysis and planning and evaluation. Youth go back to their community groups and schools to take greater leadership in youth-led social justice efforts.

 

Neighborhood exchanges promote greater cross-cultural understanding, appreciation and solidarity. Youth raise consciousness around three key themes: the need to fight against Islamophobia, strategies to bring stability to neighborhoods, and strategies to develop worker-led businesses in immigrant communities.

Immigrant E.D. initiative

Immigrant E.D.’s increase capacity to lead organizations, leading to more impactful and sustainable organizations led by grassroots community members. Potential of sharing infrastructure or systems reduces the administrative work of smaller grassroots groups, increasing their potential to impact campaigns.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Over the last 16 years, CSIO has worked to support immigrant organizations and communities to increase their capacity to organize and build constituency leadership in their organizations and communities. CSIO’s role helps create and support an “infrastructure” that the movements need in order to progress. We have serves as an anchor organization for movement building.

 

Program achievements over the past five years include:

 

- A product of our convening/holding space role was the successful creation and growth of the Immigrant Worker Center Collaborative (IWCC). CSIO brought worker center leaders together in 2006 to launch the effort, and then coordinated it until in 2012 the IWCC had the capacity to spin off to hire its own staff and become its own, independent organization.

 

- CSIO has trained over 130 immigrant leaders and organizers in the GLI. Grads have incorporated lessons learned in the Institutes in their organizations and campaigns: they have built new membership structures with their groups, developed more democratic and participatory practices that have increased membership and impact, developed more grassroots-led campaigns, set up planning systems that were more effective and grassroots-led and in bringing a deeper ‘root cause’ analysis to their work have connected more to social justice movements.

 

- In its 5-year history, Network of Immigrant and African American Solidarity (NIAAS) has reached nearly 200 immigrants and African Americans annually with dialogues and the sharing of popular education tools that remove barriers and build relationships among African Americans and immigrants of color. Tools helped create trust, understanding, and connection among participants, leading to greater support and solidarity in communities.

 

- CSIO has trained over 140 community leaders and organizers, many of whom are GLI graduates, in workshops whose topics target the pulse of the priorities of immigrant organizing. Supports have contributed to organizational changes in dozens of groups and stronger collaborations around issues and community work.

 

- CSIO has provided training and networking opportunities for over 200 immigrant youth over the past two years in our Immigrant Youth Leadership and Solidarity program. These youth have broken down stereotypes, learned about the root causes of migration and the legacy of the African American community in Boston, and held dialogues around issues such as Black Lives Matter, gentrification, and youth leadership strategies. Furthermore, we have helped peer leadership teams of over 15 youth leaders learn how to facilitate democratic and participatory meetings, run youth leadership summits and activities that have brought 200+ youth together for peer learning, leadership development and solidarity. These youth have strengthened the youth organizing work of their grassroots groups in the Latino, African and Chinese communities.

 

- CSIO has provided organizational development support for over 2 dozen grassroots organizations in areas including leadership development strategies, organizational assessments, evaluation and planning, work plan development, coaching for executives and organizers, grant writing support, budget development and financial planning. These supports have helped grassroots-led groups become more sustainable and impactful.

 

CSIO has helped develop, launch, facilitate and document lessons learned in several capacity building programs, including the Inclusion Initiative, Capacity Building Fund, and New Roots Providence. These initiatives have brought resources to our grassroots members to help them build their capacity and engage in work across communities to address the roots of poverty together.

 

What we have not accomplished to date is bringing CSIO’s programming to scale, in order to provide it to a wider community, and be able to document and share CSIO’s impact in the national field.