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Kupenda for the Children

 PO Box 473
 Hampton, NH 03843
[P] (978) 6261625
[F] --
www.kupenda.org
[email protected]
Cynthia Bauer
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INCORPORATED: 2003
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 16-1644867

LAST UPDATED: 10/04/2018
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Our Mission: Kupenda (“love” in Kiswahili) for the Children equips children with disabilities to achieve their God-given potential through advocacy, education, and medical intervention

Our Vision: A fully integrated society where people of all abilities have access to health, education, and a loving community.

Mission Statement

Our Mission: Kupenda (“love” in Kiswahili) for the Children equips children with disabilities to achieve their God-given potential through advocacy, education, and medical intervention

Our Vision: A fully integrated society where people of all abilities have access to health, education, and a loving community.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $974,421.00
Projected Expense $974,421.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Advocacy
  • Education
  • Medical

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Our Mission: Kupenda (“love” in Kiswahili) for the Children equips children with disabilities to achieve their God-given potential through advocacy, education, and medical intervention

Our Vision: A fully integrated society where people of all abilities have access to health, education, and a loving community.


Background Statement

People with disabilities are often overlooked, even by organizations focused on helping the marginalized. The estimated 1 billion people limited by disability around the world suffer much more than those without disabilities in terms of poverty, education, healthcare, abuse, basic legal rights, and inclusion in the church. These needs are often compounded by a belief that disabilities are caused by a spiritual curse. As a result, many families hide, abandon, neglect, abuse or even kill their children.

Kupenda for the Children is changing these negative perceptions by empowering communities to provide more opportunities for children with disabilities to reach their God-given potential. We chose the name Kupenda because it means “love” in Swahili, something far too many children with disabilities lack.

Kupenda began in 1999 when Cynthia Bauer visited Kenya and learned she might have been killed if she was born there because she lacked a left hand. While doing her master’s degree research in wildlife biology on the Kenyan coast, Cynthia met Leonard Mbonani, a Kenyan special needs teacher who introduced her to children with disabilities who couldn’t afford the specialized education they needed. Cynthia and Leonard worked together to raise funds and provide special education to 15 children with disabilities in Kilifi County, Kenya. In 2003, they also co-founded Kupenda which, in the 13 years since its inception, has supported thousands of children with disabilities through Advocacy, Education, and Medical Interventions.

Impact Statement

OUR IMPACT

- 100,000 People reached through community disability awareness events

- 20,000 Church members educated on their responsibility to care for children with disabilities

- 4,000 Parents of children with disabilities provided with resources and connected to services

- 2,000 Children with disabilities provided with medical care and therapy services

- 1,000 Children with disabilities integrated into special & mainstream schools


Needs Statement

Kupenda is currently fundraising to measure, refine and document our advocacy model so we can present our methods in a variety of formats to help other individuals and organizations support inclusion of children with disabilities in their work.

CEO Statement

Kupenda’s work is guided by the following values:

· Local Leadership. Our partner organization in Kenya is run by local professionals who tailor programs and service delivery for their culture, in their language and according to existing needs and realities.

· Inclusive Service. Although we are a Christian organization, we strive to be like Jesus, and so we serve all people, no matter their religion or beliefs.

· Joint Fundraising. Our Kenyan partners raise 10-30% of our program costs each year through local fundraisers and campaigns.

· Support for Local Economies. We support the local economy by sourcing supplies within the countries we work.

· Participatory Learning. Our training and events are designed around discussions and exercises that allow participants to learn from one other and craft time-bound plans that are tailored to their local context and driven by their personal conviction.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

INTERNATIONAL
Our innovation and testing center is in Kilifi County, one of Kenya's poorest areas with a poverty level of 71%. The WHO estimates that Kilifi is home to 120,000 children with disabilities, fewer than 10% of whom attend school. Most of these children also lack access to adequate food, medical care and inclusion in society. Our Kilifi programs are implemented by our Kenyan partner organization, Kuhenza. We have also implemented programs with partners in Tanzania, Sierra Leone and Zambia.

Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Disabled Persons' Rights
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Alliances & Advocacy

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Advocacy

Incorrect spiritual and cultural beliefs about disability often pose greater challenges for children with disabilities than their physical limitations. In the areas we work, many people do not expect children with disabilities to be productive members of society and some view them as cursed by witchcraft or God, which often results in their neglect, abandonment or even murder.

When we facilitate discussions about disability, participants often develop a more accurate understanding of the causes of disability and the issues impacting children with disabilities. Many of these participants then work to teach others what they have learned and provide innovative strategies to make their communities more inclusive.

Kupenda’s advocacy discussions and events have helped thousands of children with disabilities access the nutrition, education, medical care, and legal rights they deserve. Children who are healthy and fully included in all aspects of their communities also become a source of advocacy – they show others what is possible with appropriate support and adequate resources.

Budget  $341,047.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled Africa Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

In FY18, we improved quality of life for an estimated 4,573 children with disabilities through the following Advocacy Program activities:

 

  • Organized, facilitated, or shared about disability rights at 120 public gatherings and meetings that were attended by 32,877 community members
  • Organized and facilitated 47 disability advocacy meetings with government representatives
  • Organized and facilitated 76 disability advocacy meetings with 4,724 religious leaders
  • Organized and facilitated 428 meetings and counseling sessions with 1,361 families impacted by disability

 

Program Long-Term Success 

Since 2003, Kupenda’s advocacy activities have changed negative community beliefs about disability and resulted in improved care and inclusion for thousands of children. Program expenses and impact projections indicate that we are able to facilitate our advocacy activities at a cost of just $8.50 USD per child, per year with the following results:

 

  • 500,000 community members no longer believing disability is a curse and are equipped and inspired to support more than 50,000 children with disabilities in their communities
  • 2,000 families impacted by disability are aware of their rights and have access to health, education and support services
  • 1,000 pastors have a more accurate understanding of disability and mobilize their congregations to support more than 5,000 families impacted by disability in their communities
  • 1,000 government representatives are educated about disability law and take action to protect, support and include more than 10,000 families impacted by disability in their communities

 

Program Success Monitored By 

Advocacy Program outcomes are measured through Kupenda’s Disability Awareness Day and Resource Center records as well as quarterly reports submitted by selected representatives within our caregiver, local leader, and community groups.

Examples of Program Success 

Success Story: Zainabu

Zainabu’s story demonstrates how Kupenda is activating community leaders and parents to come together to improve the lives of children with disabilities in their communities. These improvements will allow Zainabu and her peers to access health and education, experience love and inclusion, and reduce their vulnerability to violence and abuse.

Six-year-old Zainabu does not walk or talk because of her cerebral palsy. Although her family longs to help her, their small farm plot generates less than a dollar each day, like 90% of people in her home village of Lango Baya. Many community members believe Zainabu’s cerebral palsy was caused by witchcraft, causing the family further alienation and lack of assistance.

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The first time I met Zainabu, I was impressed by her joy and incredible potential. We met while I was leading a group of American medical volunteers to assess several vulnerable children with disabilities in Lango Baya. One of our volunteers used her experience as a special education instructor to teach Zainabu how to use a simple communication device that recorded sounds. After recording the Swahili greeting “Mambo” into the device, the volunteer passed it to Zainabu and showed her how she could press the button to make the greeting herself. Within a few moments Zainabu had managed to press the button and say “Mambo” while looking at her mother. Her mother flashed a wide white smile and responded “Poa.” Tears welled up in my eyes at the realization of what I had just witnessed: this was their first conversation.

Zainabu’s first conversation came about because of Kupenda’s outreach to community leaders and families in her community. Over the last two years we’ve conducted disability advocacy workshops in this area with pastors, traditional healers, and government representatives to change the stigma of disability and encourage them to act on behalf of families impacted by disabilities in their community.

After our workshops, these community leaders identified 76 families impacted by disabilities, none of whom had access to proper education or medical services. They then brought these families together for a parent disability workshop where Kupenda gave them a safe space to share their challenges, teach them about the causes of disabilities, and inform them of their legal rights. Although the families were motivated to sign their children up for specialized education, we soon discovered that the appropriate schools were far away and too full to accommodate their children.

Fortunately, the parents and community leaders used what they had learned in our workshops to begin meeting together and fighting for their children’s right to specialized education.

In just a few months, their group has inspired the local government to donate 10 acres of land for a new special school. The government also committed to paying the salaries of the school’s teachers once the facility has been built.

Kupenda is now working to fund the first two classrooms for children with cerebral palsy while a local Kenyan business is reviewing our proposal for construction of the dining room, kitchen, occupational therapy room, and dormitories.

Once completed, this new special school will serve Zainabu and 140 other children like her. Zainabu and her mother are excited to think that one day soon they will have access to education, therapy services, and medical care. Our occupational therapist has told them that these services will improve Zainabu’s functioning and one day she may even be able to walk and communicate.

Zainabu reveals how our work with community leaders results in sustainable and locally-led change that benefits families with disabilities and transforms communities. We might be the spark, but the community is the flame.


Education

Children with disabilities have the right to education without discrimination. Nevertheless, many remain excluded from equal access to schooling. This means they also miss out on many of the benefits that follow, including better jobs, social and economic security, and opportunities for full participation in society.

Kupenda works with parents, leaders and communities to support children with disabilities in accessing high-quality education, tailored to their unique physical and learning needs. In addition to their personal gains, children with disabilities who succeed academically show their peers and communities what is possible when they have access to the education they need deserve.

Budget  $321,559.00
Category  Education, General/Other Special Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Elderly and/or Disabled Families
Program Short-Term Success 

In FY18, we improved quality of life for an estimated 3,441 children with disabilities through the following Education Program activities:

 

  • Provided school fees and educational support for 483 students with disabilities
  • Provided learning materials to 8 special units serving 169 students with disabilities
  • Improved teaching quality of 29 teachers and educational program directors serving 113,481 students with disabilities
  • Supported staff at 3 special needs schools serving 212 students with disabilities
  • Improved infrastructure at 3 educational facilities serving 290 students with disabilities

 

Program Long-Term Success 

Education for children with disabilities is a long-term investment, at least 17 years per child, which costs $185 USD per year for one student. Kupenda has provided educational services for children with disabilities since 2003 with the following results:

 

  • 2,000 children supported in accessing special education through referrals, tuition funding or scholarship support
  • 15 educational facilities for children with disabilities provided with materials and equipment that improved learning, comfort and mobility for approximately 1,500 children
  • 12 specialized classrooms constructed that improved learning environment and academic outcomes for approximately 1,000 children
  • 4 accessible dormitories built, which improved access to education and the learning environment for approximately 1,000 children

 

Program Success Monitored By 

Education Program outcomes are measured through quarterly student academic reports, school attendance rosters, and abuse case reports from schools and local police facilities.

Examples of Program Success 

Success Story: Elisha’s New School

I met 11-year-old Elisha and his dad at a Kupenda-led parent gathering in January. From the moment, I met him, it was obvious how loved he was by his family and community. Soon after I understood why. In addition to having such a joyful spirit, he was funny, friendly, and talented. He’s one of those people you feel is immediately your friend.

It wasn’t until they were invited to a Kupenda gathering for parents with children of disabilities that Elisha’s family discovered there were schools that could provide the specialized education he needed. This meeting of 15 families occurred because of the previous, Kupenda run, disability workshops with local government leaders, traditional healers, and pastors in their community. These leaders gathered families at a small church so we could discuss the challenges and opportunities for their children. Because of this parent meeting, Elisha and 14 new students were enrolled in special needs schools. We were especially excited when the local government chief announced they would be paying for the school fees of these children for a year! This is sustainable, community-driven success!

Elisha is now enjoying his time at the Marafa Special School and already has a lot of new friends. I’m grateful to know this guy and have a feeling his going to make a difference for so many other lives. He’s brought light to mine.


Medical

Kupenda helps children with disabilities access the medical care, equipment and supplies they need to reach optimal health and wellness. We work to ensure these medical services are high-quality, consistent, timely and tailored to the child’s unique needs. As part of this process, we also help families impacted by disability access caregiver training, transportation to facilities, and nutritional support.

Each year, Kupenda’s advocacy efforts inspire more local leaders and organizations to take responsibility for funding and delivering medical care to children with disabilities in their communities. In recent years, the success of these local empowerment efforts have allowed Kupenda to shift more of our time and funding away from direct service delivery and more on advocacy for long-term, community-led solutions.

Budget  $136,419.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other International Public Health/International Health
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Africa People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

In FY18, we improved quality of life for an estimated 2176 children with disabilities through the following Medical Program activities:

 

  • Organized 5 healthcare trainings for parents and medical professionals providing care for 267 children with disabilities
  • Supported 5 health care staff at 2 schools serving 210 children with disabilities
  • Provided nutritional support for 307 children with disabilities and their families
  • Supported medical care, therapy, surgeries, medical supplies and medications for 894 children with disabilities
  • Supported access to assistive equipment for 188 children with disabilities

 

Program Long-Term Success 

The medical needs of children with disabilities are extensive and costly. We work through local medical organizations whenever possible to minimize costs of surgeries and healthcare. Since 2003, for $107 per child per year, we have accomplished the following:

 

  • 2,000 children with disabilities provided with access to health services
  • 1,000 children provided with physical therapy services
  • 400 children provided with wheelchairs
  • 200 children provided with needed surgeries
  • 100 traditional healers trained on proper medical treatments and referrals, improving community-based care for approximately 2,000 children
  • 2 occupational therapy buildings constructed and furnished, improving therapy services for approximately 500 children

 

Program Success Monitored By 

Medical Program outcomes are measured through medical professional reports and Kupenda’s annual child progress reports.

Examples of Program Success 

Success Story: A Future for Emmanuel

How Kuhenza’s Early Childhood Interventions

Save Lives, Educate Families and Transform Communities

Two months ago, if you had told Alex Mchengo that his son would soon be gaining weight, holding utensils, and preparing to go to school, he wouldn’t have believed you. Until recently, all Alex knew of his son, Emmanuel, was that he couldn’t walk or talk and that none of the prayers and rituals he’s paid for had helped the child.

Emmanuel was born three years ago under grueling conditions. His young mother had struggled to give birth at home for three days and eventually delivered at a Malindi Hospital. It was a miracle she survived and, although Emmanuel also lived, he was born with severe cerebral palsy.

When community members told Alex they believed Emmanuel had been bewitched by his grandfather, he began seeking spiritual cures but neglected the child’s physical needs. Over time, Emmanuel suffered from malnutrition, seizures, and chronic pneumonia. Because he was left in bed and rarely moved, his back also became painful and deformed.

Fortunately, Kuhenza for the Children had recently begun caring for another child with a disability in Emmanuel’s village and was looking for other families they could support. Soon someone told Kuhenza about Emmanuel but asked the director not to mention that they’d made the referral. Alex was still deeply ashamed of Emmanuel and so kept him hidden inside, sometimes refusing to even admit he had a child with a disability.

To put Alex’s mind at ease, Kuhenza’s director asked a trusted traditional healer to accompany him to the family’s home. They then invited Alex to join a parents’ support group and offered to enroll Emmanuel in Kuhenza’s home-based care program. Alex was relieved to learn there were other children with disabilities in his community. He was also happy that the programs would be run in his village, as poverty had made it nearly impossible for him to bring Emmanuel to distant clinics and hospitals.

Today, just two months later, Alex has seen his son’s life transformed. Emmanuel can now sit up, hold objects, recognize his family members and even follow discussions with his parents. The family reports that he is “very jovial” and gaining weight, thanks to Kuhenza’s nutrition training for parents. Alex was also pleased that Kuhenza’s occupational therapist taught him how to help Emmanuel with simple therapy exercises at home.

Alex can hardly believe that next year Emmanuel will be starting school. He’s grateful that Kuhenza’s trainings have helped him to understand Emmanuel’s condition and that he’s now connected to other parents and professionals who can support him.

As with many of the children who benefit from Kuhenza’s programs, Emmanuel’s transformation is also a testament to his community that he has not been cursed, but instead, is valuable, capable, and worth of love.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Cynthia Rose Bauer
CEO Term Start Jan 1999
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Cynthia’s work as a wildlife biologist brought her to Kenya, where she was inspired to start Kupenda. She was particularly motivated to do something to help children with disabilities after finding out that she might have been killed if she had been born in Kenya because she was born without her left hand. Cynthia has over 10 years of experience as a wildlife biologist with multiple nonprofit and government agencies, which provides her with an understanding of the biology related to many disabilities and the skills to manage this growing organization. She has also taught biology classes for over a decade, which gives her insight into education systems similar to those in which Kupenda works and helps her present difficult concepts to groups we work with in Kenya and the U.S. Cynthia has a Master’s degree in Biology and Ecology and a Bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Conservation.

Cynthia is responsible for overseeing Kupenda’s administration, programs and strategic planning. Her other key duties include fundraising, marketing, and community outreach. She reports directly to the Board of Directors. Through her speeches, writing, and networking, Cynthia advocates for children with disabilities in Kenya, Tanzania, and the U.S. Cynthia also encourages others with disabilities to meet their God-given potential by sharing the message of God’s inclusive love and by playing her guitar to demonstrate what is possible when opportunities are available to everyone.

Co-CEO Mr. Leonard Mbonani
Co-CEO Term Start Jan 1999
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience Leonard has over 40 years of experience working in disability programs as a special needs assessment officer for the government, a disability researcher for an internationally-funded nonprofit organization, and an educator at special schools and units throughout Kilifi County. His compassion for people with disabilities began within his own family, when interacting with several relatives who were deaf and unable to communicate due to lack of sign language training. The abuse he saw these family members face drove him to pursue a career in disability care and advocacy. Today, Leonard says the children he serves continue to inspire him to keep working on their behalf. As the organization’s Executive Director, Leonard is responsible for Kuhenza’s strategic planning, local fundraising, reporting, partnership collaboration, event planning, child monitoring, family counseling, and program development and implementation. Leonard holds certificates Secondary Education and Primary School Management and Diplomas in Special Education and Learning Difficulties. He has participated in disability care training programs in the U.S., Denmark and Kenya and has led workshops and participated in health conferences in Tanzania, Nigeria and various regions of Kenya.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Jessica Mary Charles Development Director

Jessica Charles is as a global health professional with over 15 years of experience as a project manager, teacher trainer and communications specialist. She lived in China and Botswana for three years managing health and education projects and has supported field teams in more than 20 developing nations implementing USAID, CDC, PEPFAR and privately-funded projects. Jessica holds a Master’s degree in Public Health and a Bachelor’s degree in Writing.

As Kupenda’s Development Director, Jessica is responsible for increasing operational efficiency, program monitoring and evaluation, engaging new donors, developing and implementing strategic fundraising plans, and expanding the organization’s capacity.

Mr. Joseph Karisa Project Officer

Joseph Kibokoni is an experienced secondary school educator and has earned diplomas in information technology and Business English. Joseph also has certificates in peer guidance and counseling and computer repair and maintenance. In his work with Kupenda he assists our Kenyan team with program implementation, reporting, and disability advocacy training. Joseph is passionate about serving persons with disabilities and enjoys the time he spends interacting with Kuhenza’s child beneficiaries and their parents. Joseph is currently completing a bachelor degree in business and information technology at Mount Kenya University in Malindi.

Ms. Martha Karo Program Director Martha has over 30 years of experience as a teacher for students who are deaf. She is also the head teacher at the Gede Special School, the first special needs school supported by Kupenda. Martha’s work and experience helps Kupenda stay connected to the local education system. Her devotion to children with disabilities is demonstrated by the endless hours she works with the Kuhenza board on top of her full-time teaching position.
Mr. James Katana Bookkeeper and Resource Center Manager

James holds a diploma in accounting and a certificate in computer applications from Mombasa Polytechnic University. Before joining Kuhenza, James worked for over three years as a bookkeeper for the Marafa Community Development Programme, managing records for both World Vision and the local government. As Kuhenza’s bookkeeper, James is now responsible for recording Kuhenza’s income and expenses, collecting receipts, developing financial reports and preparing for Kenyan government audits. He also oversees the purchase, cataloging and inventory of all materials in Kuhenza’s Resources Center.

Ms. Loice Maluki Project Officer Loice volunteered with Kuhenza while conducting her master’s research on disabilities and the church. After completing her course work, Loice returned to Kuhenza and was hired as a project officer. In this role, Loice collects information for the child sponsorship program, assesses and monitors children with disabilities, connects children with special needs schools and hospitals, works with pastors, facilities advocacy workshops, and assists the Kenya director, as needed. Loice has always had a heart for people impacted by disabilities and believes the church is key to improving the culture around children with disabilities in Kenya. Loice holds certificates in Primary Education, Secondary Education, Computer Maintenance, and Computer Software. She also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Religion and a Masters degree in Religious Studies.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
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Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association MA

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

We have longstanding relationships with the following partners in the US, Europe, Kenya, and Tanzania:

· Churches: First Presbyterian Church (MA); Mosaic Christian Church (MD); Hope Community Church (MA); Essex St Baptist Church (ME); First Baptist Church (NH); The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (UT)
· Foundations: Westwood Endowment, Micah 6:8, Rees Jones, Stewardship, Mergon, Gloria Dei
· Government: National Fund for the Disabled of Kenya, National Council for Persons Living with Disabilities in Kenya, Kilifi County Ministry of Education, Association for the Physically Disabled of Kenya, UK Department for International Development
· NGOs: Adventures for the Cure, Amref Health Africa, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Plan International, World Vision, Joni and Friends, Handicapped International, World Relief
· Corporations: Toyota Kenya, BNY Mellon Community Partnership, Omega Healthcare, DBM Communications, Barclays Bank
· Schools: Gede, Marafa and Kakuyuni Special Schools
· Interns: from Gordon College, Harvard School of Public Health, Duke University, Lesley University, Hope Community Church, Maryland School for the Blind, Beverly School for the Deaf
· Child sponsors: 500+ since 2003

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 8
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 30
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 89%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 25
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 75% are Kenyan
Gender Female: 50
Male: 50
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Lauren Blair
Board Chair Company Affiliation Adventures for a Cure, University of Mary Washington, Social Security Administration, Integrated Computer Concepts; Point One
Board Chair Term July 2008 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Cynthia Bauer Army Environmental Center, Coordinator Christian Environmental Coalition, National Museums of Kenya, A Rocha Kenya, Eastern Kentucky University, University of Maine, ECCO Wildlife NonVoting
Mr. Jeff Gentry Triangle Inc. (Director); The Gathering (Assistant Pastor); Empowering People for Inclusive Communities (EPIC); Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary; Lincoln Christian College Voting
Mr. Brian Lowery Christianity Today International, PreachingToday.com, Lincoln Christian University, Madison Park Christian Church, Poplar Creek Community Church, Reunion Christian Church, Cooper Creek Christian Churc Voting
Mr. David McKay MS Cure Foundation, Ropes and Gray, Christ Church Episcopal, Boston Bar Journal, Banking and Finance, Boston College Law School, Brown University, Hamilton College Voting
Mr. Isaac Olatunde Greater Malden Behavioral Health Inc., Obafemi Awolowo University, Vision International University, Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, CAPRO Ministries International, Pioneer International Voting
Ms. Hillary Pember Oliver Wyman, Bain & Company, Ohio Wesleyan University, Groton Community School, One Hen, Inc. Voting
Ms. Patty Prasada-Rao Martha’s Place (Program Director); Christian Community Development Association; New Song Urban Ministries; PRIA Ministries; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Johns Hopkins University Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Andrew Bauer Hope Community Church, Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, Gordon College, Praze Media NonVoting
Ms. Kate Bauer Hope Community Church, Suffolk University, Messiah College, McDaniel College NonVoting
Ms. Sandra Bauer American Federation of Teachers, Lesley University, University of Maine, American Baptist Association, Hampton Falls Baptist Church Finance Committee NonVoting
Dr. Richard Bransford Bethany Kids, Africa Inland Church Kijabe Hospital, UCLA, Johns Hopkins University, Centre Medical Evangelique, U.S. Air Force, Prince Leopold School of Tropical Medicine NonVoting
Mr. Anthony Maranto Earth Resources Technology Inc., LEEK Mountain Preserve, Booz Allen Hamilton, US Army Environmental Center, JM Waller & Consulting Associates, Inc., University of Maryland, Union Institute & Universit NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 1 (Nigerian)
Gender Female: 4
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 50%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Kupenda is currently facing a number of opportunities for growth. While we have a successful model assisting children with disabilities, we hope to one day provide care and support for people with disabilities in all life stages. Some of the ways we can accomplish this is by providing vocational services and elder care once students have aged out of our programs. To date, we have initiated this endeavor by educating people with disabilities about discrimination laws, as well as helping to fund vocational school tuition. We are also exploring ways other countries are addressing these needs to find the most successful model for development.
 
Additionally, we are striving to reach more leaders in the communities who can generate local buy-in for our mission. One of the most productive ways we are accomplishing this is by performing advocacy workshops among pastors, government officials, and traditional healers. We are also developing curriculum for the Muslim population and hope to engage this group more fully in the near future as well.
 
Furthermore, we are in the beginning stages of replicating our model of care in other countries. While we have already expanded our program to Tanzania, Zambia and Sierra Leone, we are also looking into the possibility of utilizing our model in other place, such as Haiti and India. We have also engaged other non-profits on a global platform about creating partnerships to assist them in expanding their missions to include people with disabilities.
 
As with all of our efforts, we aim to fine tune our programs. One of the best ways to do this is by expanding our research efforts in order to measure improvement in the attitudes of communities towards people with disabilities. While we currently conduct surveys among local leaders and through child progress reports, we are investigating new and more thorough ways to track belief system changes, actions taken on behalf of children with disabilities, and benefits to children with disabilities so that we may continue the most effective advocacy, education, and care.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $974,421.00
Projected Expense $974,421.00
Form 990s

2017 Form 990

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $421,505 $309,903 $234,652
Total Expenses $372,448 $297,497 $232,772

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- $0 $0
Individual Contributions $421,498 $302,865 $223,803
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue -- $0 $0
Investment Income, Net of Losses $7 $0 $0
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events -- $0 $0
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $7,038 $10,849

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $172,157 $231,225 $164,321
Administration Expense $99,008 $54,293 $55,339
Fundraising Expense $101,283 $11,979 $13,112
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.13 1.04 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 46% 78% 71%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 24% 4% 6%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $101,785 $52,728 $40,322
Current Assets $101,785 $52,728 $40,322
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $101,785 $52,728 $40,322

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Kupenda (“love” in Swahili) for the Children equips children with disabilities to achieve their God-given potential through our 3 programs: Advocacy, Education and Medical. In collaboration with local leaders, Kupenda educates families and communities about the rights of children with disabilities and how to support them by advocating for their medical care, education, legal rights, and inclusion in all aspects of society. We also help children with disabilities access appropriate, high-quality education and medical services including surgeries, medications, and therapy.

Our target population includes children and youth with any long-term disabilities (i.e., physical, cognitive, sensory and emotional health issues) and their families.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Advocacy: When the community leaders understand that children with disabilities deserve the same opportunities as people without disabilities, they provide innovative strategies to ensure these children have access to education, health and full inclusion in community life. Therefore, Kupenda teaches families and communities about the true causes of disability and what children with disabilities are capable of, when given opportunities. We do this through training workshops, large-scale public events, family counseling sessions, and our community resource center.

Education: Consistent access to high-quality education gives children with disabilities life and career opportunities that otherwise would not be available to them. Kupenda supports this goal by providing special education teachers, school supplies, teacher trainings, construction of school facilities, and boarding school fees.

Medical: Many of the families we work with do not have the resources needed to provide medical care for the children with disabilities in their care. In response, Kupenda provides funding, referrals and transportation to help children access the care they need, such as physical therapy, doctor visits, surgeries, medication, nutritional support, and equipment such as wheel chairs and hearing aids.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Advocacy Program - meeting facilitators, parent advocates, pastor advocates, traditional healer advocates, Islamic experts, theology experts, family counselors, Disability Handbook, Disability Law Guidebook, patient referral lists, CP handbook, abuse prevention handbook

Education Program – cerebral palsy workshop facilitator and training manual, Autism workshop facilitator and training manual; Sign language workshop facilitator and training manual; Abuse prevention training facilitator and training materials; Special needs teachers; Child sponsorship program managers, Child sponsors

Medical Program - Vehicle for transportation to medical facilitates; Medical care resources and manuals; Medical program manager; Medical training facilitators; Relationships with local physicians, occupational therapists and NGOs (such as the Red Cross); Monthly medical fund

Financial support from 12 Foundations, 20 Philanthropists, 230 Child Sponsors, 18 Churches, 12 Businesses, 10 Annual Events and one Government Entity (the UK Department for International Development)


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

In FY19, Kupenda’s success will be measured against the following outcomes and indicators. 

International Advocacy Program: By expanding Kupenda’s disability advocacy program to new nations and organizations, improve health, education and inclusion of 80,000 children with disabilities

Kenya Advocacy Program: By advocating to 250,016 community members in Kilifi County, improve the health, education and inclusion of 25,016 Kenyan children with disabilities

Education Program: Improved education access and outcomes for 1,500 children with disabilities in Kilifi County

Medical Program: Improved health access and outcomes for 1,000 children with disabilities in Kilifi County

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Advocacy: Since 2003, Kupenda’s advocacy activities have changed negative community beliefs about disability and resulted in improved care and inclusion for thousands of children. Program expenses and impact projections indicate that we are able to facilitate our advocacy activities at a cost of just $8.50 USD per child, per year with the following results: 500,000 community members no longer believing disability is a curse and are equipped and inspired to support more than 50,000 children with disabilities in their communities; 2,000 families impacted by disability are aware of their rights and have access to health, education and support services; 1,000 pastors have a more accurate understanding of disability and mobilize their congregations to support more than 5,000 families impacted by disability in their communities; 1,000 government representatives are educated about disability law and take action to protect, support and include more than 10,000 families impacted by disability in their communities

Education: Education for children with disabilities is a long-term investment, at least 17 years per child, which costs $185 USD per year for one student. Kupenda has provided educational services for children with disabilities since 2003 with the following results: 2,000 children supported in accessing special education through referrals, tuition funding or scholarship support; 15 educational facilities for children with disabilities provided with materials and equipment that improved learning, comfort and mobility for approximately 1,500 children; 12 specialized classrooms constructed that improved learning environment and academic outcomes for approximately 1,000 children; 4 accessible dormitories built, which improved access to education and the learning environment for approximately 1,000 children

Medical: The medical needs of children with disabilities are extensive and costly. We work through local medical organizations whenever possible to minimize costs of surgeries and healthcare. Since 2003, for $107 per child per year, we have accomplished the following: 2,000 children with disabilities provided with access to health services; 1,000 children provided with physical therapy services; 400 children provided with wheelchairs; 200 children provided with needed surgeries; 100 traditional healers trained on proper medical treatments and referrals, improving community-based care for approximately 2,000 children; 2 occupational therapy buildings constructed and furnished, improving therapy services for approximately 500 children