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Education Trust Inc. - Massachusetts

 1250 H Street, NW, Suite 700
 Washington, DC 20005
[P] (202) 293-1217 x 321
[F] --
www.edtrust.org
[email protected]
Judy Karasik
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1997
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 52-1982223

LAST UPDATED: 04/12/2018
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Education Trust promotes high academic achievement for all students at all levels — pre-kindergarten through college. Our goal is to close the gaps in opportunity and achievement that consign far too many young people — especially those from low-income families or who are Black, Latino, or American Indian — to lives on the margins of the American mainstream.

Mission Statement

The Education Trust promotes high academic achievement for all students at all levels — pre-kindergarten through college. Our goal is to close the gaps in opportunity and achievement that consign far too many young people — especially those from low-income families or who are Black, Latino, or American Indian — to lives on the margins of the American mainstream.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $22,728,848.00
Projected Expense $22,728,848.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Achievement and Opportunity in Massachusetts

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Education Trust promotes high academic achievement for all students at all levels — pre-kindergarten through college. Our goal is to close the gaps in opportunity and achievement that consign far too many young people — especially those from low-income families or who are Black, Latino, or American Indian — to lives on the margins of the American mainstream.

Background Statement

The Education Trust is a national non-profit advocacy organization that promotes high academic achievement for all students at all levels, particularly for students of color and low-income students. We were founded for one reason and one reason alone: to push, prod, and cajole our country toward educational justice.

From our beginnings in the early 1990s, our unrelenting advocacy continues to be supported by solid data analysis, equity-focused legislative proposals, strong partnerships with leading organizations, and proven strategies to improve the educational outcomes of our nation’s youth.

With these tools we aim to expose — and eliminate — the gaps in opportunity by race and income that have led to enormous gaps in educational achievement, pre-K through college. These gaps can severely limit economic and social mobility.


Impact Statement

Top 3 -5 Accomplishments from 2017

Advocated at the federal level for equity in current and emerging policy, P-12 through higher ed.

Convened 3 “ESSA Boot Camps” for representatives of 190 diverse advocates from 22 states and continued to support them with policy, data, and strategy.

Published data-rich reports, blogs, podcasts, web-based tools, op-eds covering P-12 and Higher Ed issues around equity.

Earned media coverage in major markets for our work.

Began to expand work into resource equity and early childhood education.

Goals for 2018-19

Broaden public demand for improved results in P-12 and higher education, including building and strengthening coalitions.

Advocate for the adoption of needed changes in policy and practice at the federal, state, and institutional levels.

Ensure that the Education Trust has the strategic leadership, direction, infrastructure, and resources to maintain — indeed, to grow — its position as a credible, vital, and sustainable organization.


Needs Statement

Cultivate partnerships for action to improve outcomes for low-income students and students of color.

Redefine and amplify college student success in ways that prioritize low income students and students of color through research, policy, and practice.

Press for equitable policy and practice that advance college- and career-readiness for all students, particularly low-income students and students of color.

Strengthen the leadership, infrastructure, resources, and culture required to be a credible voice on equity issues for low income students and students of color.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

NATIONAL
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Organization Categories

  1. Education - Alliances & Advocacy
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Achievement and Opportunity in Massachusetts

The agency to demand that state decisions prioritize the needs, interests, and potential of vulnerable students rests largely with advocates representing the communities with the most at stake in these decisions: civil rights and social justice advocates, business leaders, parents, and equity-minded educators. In several states, diverse coalitions representing these communities have, with Ed Trust support, come together to demand equity-advancing action from state leaders. We propose to support and engage a similar equity coalition in Massachusetts.

We envision three components to this work:

1. Engaging diverse local stakeholders to understand interests and priorities, identify areas of common cause, and discuss advocacy opportunities and strategies.

2. Enabling those stakeholders to learn from and with equity coalitions in other states. We’ll bring coalitions from multiple states together to create a network that both shares information on what works — and provides inspiration from what’s possible.

3. Building their capacity to engage in strategic advocacy. We’ll leverage the Ed Trust’s data, policy, and advocacy expertise, tailoring those assets to local context and relationships. With these tools, credible in-state partners can make clear the need to increase opportunities and achievement among the Commonwealth’s low-income students and students of color, and identify opportunities do just that. We will accomplish this goal through data-rich reports and analyses, public events, and media engagement.

We’ve begun to lay the groundwork through initial meetings with Massachusetts advocates and additional analysis of the data on opportunity and achievement among the Commonwealth’s students. These initial conversations demonstrate significant interest in the kind of coalition support and engagement that we propose.

Budget  $1,786,143.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Blacks, African Heritage Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success  In the near term, we want to see the crafting and widespread promotion of a counter-narrative to the dominant one that says that Massachusetts is number one in education, and therefore the status quo is just fine. We will do this by issuing, in partnership with a diverse group of Massachusetts advocates, a data-rich report with the working title “First for Some.” We’re expecting these key messages: while Massachusetts has a lot to celebrate, the state cannot for a minute forget the educational inequities that communities of color and low-income communities face — and tackling these inequities should be the new priority for the state’s educational agenda. The report’s release will be timed to coincide with the spring 2018 celebrations of the 25th anniversary of the Massachusetts Education Reform Act (MERA).
Program Long-Term Success 

In a year, we would be successful if Massachusetts had a coalition up and running, one that’s diverse and includes new constituencies, including stakeholders that might have been improbable before, and new, younger voices. This coalition will be organized around a clearly defined agenda and staffed by the personnel described briefly above, will have taken at least one concrete, collective advocacy action — such as writing a letter, generating policy recommendations, publishing a brief or an op-ed, providing public testimony, or meeting with state policymakers, and will be primed to take more such actions in the coming year.

In two years, the coalition will have taken five concrete, collective advocacy actions. And it will be recognized as a voice for equity throughout the Commonwealth as measured by media attention, requests to participate in stakeholder conversations, and other common-sense indicators.

Program Success Monitored By 

Release of "First for Some" report. Evidence of Education Trust support to coalitions; evidence of coalitions' engagement in concrete, collective advocacy actions.

Examples of Program Success 

We’ve begun conversations with a range of organizations, including the Bessie Tartt Wilson Initiative for Children, the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights, Latinos for Education, the Urban League, Mass Parents United, Higher Ground, the Worcester Education Collaborative, MassCAN, Strategies for Children, the Massachusetts Association for Bilingual Education, Catholic Charities, Educators for Excellence, the Massachusetts Law Reform Institute, the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition, Teach Plus, and Stand for Children.

Our conversations with these groups were grounded in data — starting with a Data Equity Walk in which participants discussed the most recent data on opportunity and achievement among different groups of students in the Commonwealth — and led to reflections on needs and opportunities to advance equity in Massachusetts, and discussion of the other perspectives and communities that also need to be at the table, including the business and philanthropic communities. Our goal is to include these and other voices in conversations going forward.

In addition, we've begun the work of listening to and learning from organizations such as Sociedad Latino and the Greater Boston Latino Network about priorities, concerns, and opportunities in education — as a part of ongoing active efforts to further expand the set of groups we’re working with, prioritizing social justice and community-based organizations.

These initial conversations demonstrate significant interest in the kind of coalition support and engagement that we propose. They also demonstrate the importance of approaching this through the lens of supporting the organizations and individuals already doing the work on the ground. As one parent advocate pointedly told us, “If you’re here with your national bag of tricks, you can turn right back around. If you’re here to work with and support us, let’s talk.”


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. John B. King
CEO Term Start Mar 2017
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 83
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 29
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 4
Caucasian: 37
Hispanic/Latino: 12
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Bi-racial
Gender Female: 58
Male: 25
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. David Britt
Board Chair Company Affiliation Sesame Workshop, Retired
Board Chair Term Feb 2009 - Feb 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Russlynn Ali Managing Director of Education at the Emerson Collective, CEO of the XQ Institute Voting
David Britt Retired, Sesame Workshop Voting
JoseLuis Cruz President, Lehman College Voting
Yolie Flores Campaign for Grade-Level Reading Voting
James Forman Professor, Yale School of Law Voting
Peter Groff Former President, Colorado Senate Voting
John B King President and CEO, The Education Trust Voting
Arturo Pacheco Professor Emeritus, University of Texas at El Paso --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Bi-racial
Gender Female: 2
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 37%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $22,728,848.00
Projected Expense $22,728,848.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

Audit Documents

2017 Audited Financials

2016 Audited Financials

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $12,930,065 $11,596,285 $13,948,345
Total Expenses $13,233,613 $12,661,114 $11,182,829

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $0 $0 $0
Individual Contributions $12,283,558 $10,832,021 $13,208,120
Indirect Public Support $0 $0 $0
Earned Revenue $566,345 $641,570 $584,060
Investment Income, Net of Losses $71,697 $59,204 $61,034
Membership Dues $0 $0 $0
Special Events $0 $0 $44,827
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $8,465 $63,490 $50,304

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $12,482,968 $11,902,896 $10,405,007
Administration Expense $329,452 $314,068 $292,810
Fundraising Expense $421,193 $444,150 $485,012
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.98 0.92 1.25
Program Expense/Total Expenses 94% 94% 93%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 4% 4%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $17,058,505 $16,593,096 $17,439,507
Current Assets $9,679,959 $7,979,722 $9,063,110
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $2,259,196 $1,498,538 $1,350,491
Total Net Assets $14,799,309 $15,094,558 $16,089,016

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.28 5.33 6.71

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. Please note, the data and files above reflect this nonprofit's national work, not just Massachusetts.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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