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College Advising Corps - Boston University (CAC-BU)

 100 Bay State Road, Room 540B
 Boston, MA 02215
[P] (617) 358-2655
[F] --
http://www.bu.edu/cac/
[email protected]
Katie Hill
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INCORPORATED: 2013
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2103547

LAST UPDATED: 04/12/2018
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

College Advising Corps – Boston University (CAC-BU) works to increase the rate of college enrollment and completion among low-income, first-generation college and underrepresented high school students from the Boston area. To deliver on this mission, CAC-BU places well-trained, recent college graduates from Boston University and other Boston-area institutions of higher education as full-time advisers in every Boston Public high school and KIPP Academy Lynn Collegiate.

Mission Statement

College Advising Corps – Boston University (CAC-BU) works to increase the rate of college enrollment and completion among low-income, first-generation college and underrepresented high school students from the Boston area. To deliver on this mission, CAC-BU places well-trained, recent college graduates from Boston University and other Boston-area institutions of higher education as full-time advisers in every Boston Public high school and KIPP Academy Lynn Collegiate.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,502,024.00
Projected Expense $1,502,024.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • College Advising Corps - Boston University

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

College Advising Corps – Boston University (CAC-BU) works to increase the rate of college enrollment and completion among low-income, first-generation college and underrepresented high school students from the Boston area. To deliver on this mission, CAC-BU places well-trained, recent college graduates from Boston University and other Boston-area institutions of higher education as full-time advisers in every Boston Public high school and KIPP Academy Lynn Collegiate.

Background Statement

Research shows low-income, first-generation and underrepresented students are less likely to apply to college than their more affluent, white counterparts who have access to college knowledge and experience within their family. Most first-generation college students seek college guidance within the school day; however, the Massachusetts student-to-guidance counselor ratio is 434:1, which results in an average student receiving fewer than 20 minutes of guidance annually. These students need instrumental support navigating the college process, as well as role models and mentors. College Advising Corps – Boston University (CAC-BU) serve both these needs.

CAC-BU provides the support that high-need Boston-area students require to navigate the complexities of college admissions, financial aid, matriculation, and completion. Advisers also work to foster a college-going culture within the schools they serve, which is one of the best predictors of whether students will pursue higher education at all. As 91% of current near-peer advisers are first-generation, low-income, and/or people of color themselves, advisers are an inspiration as well as resource for their students.

Unlike some peer organizations, CAC-BU advisers are in schools full-time, serving students through a whole-school model. While the majority of activities are concentrated in upper grades, advisers also serve underclassmen through exploratory and knowledge-building activities such as workshops and campus trips. Further, CAC-BU leverages and extends the work of other part-time or out-of-school organizations by building schools’ capacity. Advisers serve as “air-traffic controllers” within schools—connecting students to additional resources and opportunities they would not otherwise be able to access.

CAC-BU’s partnership structure comprises: College Advising Corps national office (CAC), Boston University (BU), and Boston Public Schools. Each entity brings valuable resources to the program model, organizational capacity, and sustainability.

CAC launched in Boston in 2013 with support from the Boston-based GreenLight Fund’s Social Innovation Fund initiative. In 2015, CAC partnered with Boston University as the institutional anchor for the Boston program, and thus CAC-BU officially launched. Over the last five years, CAC-BU has grown from a team of five advisers to 32 advisers serving 34 schools and over 10,800 students annually.


Impact Statement

Accomplishments

  • 32 near-peer advisers directly served over 10,800 students through one-on-one or small group meetings across 34 school partners.
  • Students in CAC-BU schools were approximately 2.1 percentage points more likely to attend college in the fall after high school graduation than students in non-CAC schools. Further, increases in two-year college enrollments for CAC-BU schools are statistically significant for our target population: low-income (3.1%), Hispanic (8.3%) and male students (4.2%). (Evaluation and Assessment Solutions for Education at Stanford University, 2017)
  • CAC-BU advisers directly represent the students they serve: 91% of current near-peer advisers are first-generation, low-income, and/or people of color themselves, and 34% are Boston Public School graduates.

Goals

  • CAC-BU seeks to grow its adviser team from 32 to 36 in order to provide a more consistent adviser presence in its most under-resourced high schools, and consider new expansion to select Boston-area schools in most immediate need of CAC-BU resources.
  • Continue to deepen CAC-BU impact in existing school partners, improving program implementation and service to all students.
  • Build long-term sustainability for CAC-BU through new sources of funding, partnerships, etc.

Needs Statement

Secure funds to ensure the ability to hire 4 new advisers and sustain their impact in our school partners for a minimum of two school years.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
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Organization Categories

  1. Education - Higher Education
  2. Public & Societal Benefit - Leadership Development
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

College Advising Corps - Boston University

CAC-BU’s research-based intervention is centered on getting more students to complete 8 key performance indicators (KPIs): campus visits, college rep visits, college fairs, college-knowledge workshops, SAT/ACT registration, college application submission, FAFSA submission, and scholarship dollars. Completion of these activities has been found to be predictive of college enrollment and workforce readiness.

Advisers work intensively through one-on-one and small group meetings with upperclassmen through the entire college search and application process, providing the individualized support first-generation students need. This includes planning college application steps, building lists of colleges in which to apply, completing admissions/financial aid applications, and enrolling at schools that are “best match/fit” to the individual’s needs. CAC-BU emphasizes the advantages of diverse postsecondary pathways, including but not limited to four-year college, community college, and programs like Year Up or AmeriCorps. CAC-BU works to destigmatize community college and alternative postsecondary pathways through workshops, trips to community college campuses, and Decision Day events (an inclusive event that celebrates every senior pursuing postsecondary education). We inspire students who are not considering college at all to envision themselves as college potential.

In addition to admissions support (tackling immediate needs/short-term goals), CAC-BU interventions include long-term investment in developing a stronger school college-going culture. Through classroom presentations, campus trips, whole-school activities and “culture building” initiatives, advisers plant the seeds for postsecondary success early. CAC-BU’s dual focus--supporting students to complete college enrollment steps and develop a whole-school college-going culture--provides unique value.

CAC-BU works in collaboration with school-based staff to build a program that fits the needs of the school community. Our collaborative approach and additive model (not displacing counselors) ensures that we are maximizing resources and building sustainability within our unique school communities.

On an average day, the adviser will likely do any or all of the following: hold one-on-one meetings with seniors during study halls, lunch, or after school to complete application steps (Common App, essays); present in classrooms about college research or types of financial aid; work collaboratively with school partners and staff to host events such as campus trips; promote college throughout the building (decorate bulletin boards with college acceptances, college pennants); connect with families through newsletters or College Nights.

An individual student’s schedule and engagement with the adviser will vary depending on the school site. Yearly, CAC-BU averages 7 one-on-one and 6 small group meetings with seniors, 2 one-on-one and 4 small group meetings with juniors, and 1 small group meeting with underclassmen. Of all meetings CAC-BU held in FY17, 57% were longer than 30 minutes and 23% were 11-30 minutes. This indicates a high dosage of time spent working closely with students served. Regular, repetitive, individualized engagement with students directly ties to the need CAC-BU advisers are trying to address: first-generation students not receiving enough attention and resources to successfully navigate the complexities of the college application process.

A critical component of CAC-BU’s intervention is our near-peer model. Advisers are recent bachelor’s degree graduates from Boston-area colleges who can relate to the students in powerful ways; 91% of CAC-BU’s current near-peer advisers are first-generation, low-income, and/or people of color themselves, and 34% are Boston Public School graduates. They are positioned to inspire and connect with students, delivering the message: If I can succeed in college, you can too!

Budget  $1,502,024.00
Category  Education, General/Other Guidance & Counseling
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Families At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

In order to execute its mission of increased college enrollment and graduation rates for Boston students and strengthened college-going cultures in the schools we serve, CAC-BU works to:

  • Hire and train a team of highly diverse, passionate, and skilled near-peer advisers
  • Maintain long-term relationships with partner high schools
  • Continue to strengthen its program model and service delivery through rigorous evaluation and reflection

CAC-BU delivers and measures yearly program outputs which research shows are predictive of college enrollment and persistence:

  • Students served and regularly served
  • College application submissions
  • FAFSA submissions
  • SAT/ACT registration
  • College exploration engagement (campus trips, rep visits)

CAC-BU’s short-term, annual outcomes include increasing the number of students who:

  • Receive college acceptances
  • Graduate with a postsecondary plan
  • Aspire to college
  • Attend college exploration activities
Program Long-Term Success 

CAC-BU’s mid-and long-term outcomes (1-6 years) include:

  • Strengthened college-going culture
  • Increased college enrollment rates, particularly at match-fit colleges
  • Increased college persistence
  • Increased college graduation
Program Success Monitored By 

Working in collaboration with CAC’s external evaluators from Evaluation and Assessment Solutions for Education (EASE) at Stanford University, CAC-BU conducts several ongoing evaluation efforts that monitor program performance and impact. CAC-BU is committed to constantly engaging in identifying areas of improvement, expanding our knowledge base, and sharing best practices with our schools and community.

Advisers enter student engagement and college application activity data daily into GRACE, CAC’s custom-made, web-based data platform. This includes logging meetings with students (type of meeting, topic of conversation, etc.) and updating the status of key performance indicators (SAT registration, college application submission, FAFSA submission, etc.). Starting in 2017, advisers have the ability to log alternative pathway as well as college applications, so that we may better capture the post-secondary trajectories of all students. This is an area of evaluation that CAC-BU seeks to strengthen in the years to come. GRACE is essential for advisers to target services and ensure students are being equitably served. It is also a key performance measurement tool for CAC-BU staff to monitor progress toward outcomes and compare performance data year-to-year. GRACE is also a legacy tool, as the data carries year to year and allows new advisers to access important information about previous student activities (campus trip attendance, SAT completion, etc.). GRACE is compliant with all FERPA and data security mandates to ensure student safety and privacy.

Additionally, CAC-BU works with EASE to collect, analyze, and learn from three important surveys: the Boston Public School Senior Exit Survey, the CAC Counselor Survey, and the Adviser Survey. Senior Exit Surveys are distributed by BPS yearly, and are used to assess college-going attitudes and culture change in the schools we serve. When CAC-BU began its partnership with BPS in 2013, EASE worked with BPS to adapt the Senior Exit Survey to better capture college-going indicators, which has helped CAC-BU to more clearly assess its impact. In spring 2017, EASE also distributed and analyzed a Counselor Survey that is designed to gather information on ideal adviser characteristics, counselor responsibilities, the schools’ college preparation policies and resources, and ways to improve CAC’s impact. Finally, the Adviser Survey is distributed and analyzed by EASE annually. This survey captures the perspective of advisers regarding key elements of the CAC-BU program including observations of college-going culture, barriers to success, adviser training, adviser experience, and adviser support.

CAC-BU’s impact on mid-term and long-term goals such as college matriculation and persistence is monitored through analysis of National Student Clearinghouse data. CAC-BU receives this data through a data-sharing agreement with Boston Public Schools.

EASE shares its evaluation learning with CAC-BU directors and advisers alike. Each year, the entire national team of 600+ advisers gathers for the national Summit where they hear findings and trends directly from the evaluation team. Including advisers in this conversation is just one way that CAC fulfills its core value of being data and results driven. That conversation continues in Boston during monthly in-service trainings, which regularly incorporate a data and impact- focused training or discussion.

Taken collectively, these multiple data collection and monitoring systems make up CAC-BU’s multi-faceted approach to evaluation. As a data-driven organization, CAC-BU continuously uses data to hone program delivery, identify opportunities, and address challenges.

Examples of Program Success 

CAC-BU is already seeing marked success in its intended outcomes. In school-year 2016-17, CAC-BU supported thousands of students to learn about diverse college pathways and prepare applications and financial aid:

  • 64% of 9-12th graders served (10,815)
  • 74% of seniors had one or more one-on-one meeting(s) (2,902)
  • 85% of seniors served (3,339)
  • 68% of seniors served three or more times (2,667)
  • 78% of juniors served (3,445)
  • 48% of freshman and sophomores served (4,031)

An analysis of BPS Senior Exit Survey data conducted by our Stanford University external evaluation team (EASE) found that students in CAC-BU schools who meet with advisers have better outcomes than other students. Students who meet with advisers are statistically more likely to:

  • Plan to attend a four-year college (7.8%)
  • Plan to attend college full-time (7.3%)
  • Feel that school prepares them for college and careers (6%)
  • Receive information about careers and technical education (CTE) (7.9%)
  • Receive scholarships (9.6%)

As a result of engagement with CAC-BU advisers, more seniors submitted applications and financial aid forms, resulting in acceptances. Across 34 partner high schools:

  • 78% of seniors applied to college (3,067)
  • 57% applied to three or more colleges (2,243)
  • 71% completed the FAFSA (2,763)
  • 64% took the ACT/SAT (2,510)
  • 71% were accepted to college (2,787)

Advisers significantly strengthen school college-going cultures. In 2016-17, 34% of upperclassmen (2,852 students) at partner high schools attended a campus visit organized by an adviser; 38% of upperclassmen (3,136 students) at partner high schools met with a college admissions representative accompanied by an adviser, and 75% of BPS counselors surveyed ranked CAC-BU “Above Average” in improving school college-going culture relative to other college access organizations (EASE Counselor Survey).

Preliminary college enrollment results indicate that CAC-BU has positively impacted college enrollment for its first two graduating classes:

  • Students in CAC-BU schools were approximately 2.1 percentage points more likely to attend college​ ​in​ ​the​ ​fall​ ​after​ ​high​ ​school​ ​graduation​ ​than​ ​students​ ​in​ ​non-CAC-BU​ ​schools
  • Students in CAC-BU schools were approximately 1.8 percentage points more likely to enroll in​ ​a​ ​two-year​ ​college​ ​in​ ​the​ ​fall​ ​after​ ​graduation​ ​than​ ​students​ ​in​ ​non-CAC-BU ​ ​schools. This increase did not come at the cost of four-year college enrollment.
  • Increases in two-year college enrollments for CAC-BU schools are statistically significant for low-income​ ​(3.1%),​ ​Hispanic​ ​(8.3%)​ ​and​ ​male​ ​students​ ​(4.2%)
  • Of the schools CAC-BU began serving in 2014, nine of the fifteen schools, on average, saw increases in either their two-year or four-year​ ​enrollments​ ​immediately​ ​following​ ​graduation​ ​between​ ​2015​ ​and​ ​2016

Nationally, students advised by CAC persist from their first to second year of college at higher rates (74%) than the national average (69%, according to College Board). With continued work in Boston, we will collect and analyze CAC-BU’s impact on college persistence and graduation rates to ensure that we are meeting if not exceeding CAC’s national average.

CAC-BU is a double bottom line organization: in addition to the high school students served, CAC-BU impacts advisers’ career trajectories and seeks to launch the next generation of leaders. Advisers report that CAC-BU training increased transferable skills like public speaking (84%), event planning (84%), and cultural competencies (74%). Compared to their interest prior to CAC-BU, advisers expressed strong interest in attending graduate school (22% increase), pursuing nonprofit careers (9% increase), education (12% increase), or college access (112% increase) after their term of service. Nearly all second-year advisers who completed their service in 2017 continued to work with youth or in public service.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Katie Hill
CEO Term Start Jan 2014
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Stephanie Cafaro Senior Assistant Director --
Katie Hill Director --
Amanda Matos Senior Assistant Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

CAC-BU’s partnership structure comprises: College Advising Corps national office (CAC); Boston University (BU); and Boston Public Schools. Each entity brings valuable resources to the program model, organizational capacity, and sustainability.

National CAC provides the program model, technical support, and funding. Dr. Nicole Hurd, CEO and nationally recognized college access leader, founded CAC in 2005. As all CAC programs are on a cost-share model with national, CAC will continue to be a reliable funder.

BU is a critical partner and sustainability source for CAC-BU, providing indispensable resources and in-kind support including: administrative, human resources; finance and grants management; office and training space; adviser recruitment, and content expertise. BU’s leadership fully backs CAC-BU and is committed to its success. All CAC-BU staff—including advisers—are BU employees.

CAC-BU has cultivated strong relationships with the Boston Public Schools district and individual school partners with Memorandum of Understanding with all. Individual schools commit to supporting the program and adviser. CAC-BU was recently selected for BPS’s “Opportunity Partners,” which will provide additional resources and enhance CAC-BU’s reputation.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 35
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 13
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 4
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 4
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 26
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? No
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Peter T. Grauer
Board Chair Company Affiliation Chairman, Bloomberg L.P.
Board Chair Term Jan 2001 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
MC Belk Pilon Board Chair, John M. Belk Endowment Voting
Erskine Bowles Former President, University of North Carolina System Voting
The Honorable Joaquin Castro Member, United States House of Representatives Voting
Steven A. Denning Chairman, General Atlantic LLC Voting
Peter T. Grauer Chairman, Bloomberg L.P. Voting
Nicole Hurd Founder & CEO, College Advising Corps Voting
Dr. Lisa Jackson Co-Founder & Principal, Jackson-Ellis Associates Voting
John Sexton Ph.D. Former President, New York University Voting
Dr. Holden Thorp Ph.D. Provost & Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Washington University Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 9
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 9

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions --
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,502,024.00
Projected Expense $1,502,024.00
Form 990s

2016 Trustees of Boston University 990

2015 Trustees of Boston University 990

Audit Documents

2016 Trustees of Boston University Audit

2015 Trustees of Boston University Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $14,795,454 $12,308,505 $14,189,562
Total Expenses $13,427,326 $9,612,586 $8,869,749

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $1,066,560 $333,522 $464,059
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,066,560 $333,522 $464,059
Individual Contributions $13,698,174 $11,946,387 $13,538,637
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $15,000 $17,536 $184,142
Investment Income, Net of Losses $9,401 $2,790 --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $6,319 $8,270 $2,724

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $11,560,580 $8,381,565 $8,278,029
Administration Expense $1,491,553 $744,985 $326,262
Fundraising Expense $375,193 $486,036 $265,458
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.10 1.28 1.60
Program Expense/Total Expenses 86% 87% 93%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 4% 2%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $17,295,368 $12,279,035 $10,081,242
Current Assets $17,197,834 $12,179,777 $10,046,042
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $7,218,175 $3,569,970 $4,068,096
Total Net Assets $10,077,193 $8,709,065 $6,013,146

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.38 3.41 2.47

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

College Advising Corps – Boston University (CAC-BU) launched in Boston in 2013 with support from the Boston-based GreenLight Fund’s Social Innovation Fund initiative. In 2015, CAC partnered with Boston University as the institutional anchor for the Boston program, and thus CAC-BU officially launched. As such, the Trustees of Boston University's IRS Form 990s and audits are posted above. Income and expense projections reflect CAC-BU. The data in the charts and graphs reflects the national CAC entity (National College Advising Corps Inc., EIN# 46-1192687) and is per that entity's 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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